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Archive for the ‘Healthy People’ Category

 

Walk into any convenience store, and you’ll see a wide variety of energy drinks to choose from. In recent years, news reports have brought attention to some of the consequences of their overuse. Some of these reports document emergency room visits related to mixing energy drinks and alcohol or teens having heart palpitations and dizziness. Some high schools around the nation have banned these products because so many students were “wired” on caffeine and many becoming ill. Are energy drinks as popular and as dangerous as the media portrays them to be? A factsheet from the University of California Cooperative Extension service explores the facts behind these popular products.

  • The term energy drink refers to beverages that contain caffeine in combination with other ingredients such as taurine, guarana, and B vitamins purported to supply consumers with extra energy.
  • Limited research suggests that energy drinks can improve physical and mental performance, improve driving ability when tired, and decrease mental fatigue after long periods of concentration. However, researchers do not know if these improvements are due to caffeine, herbal ingredients, or a combination of both.
  • An 8 ounce serving of energy drink can contain anywhere from 80 to 150 mg of caffeine. The caffeine content is more than that of sodas (22-46 mg per 8 oz serving) but more comparable to tea (48 to 175 mg per 8 oz serving) and brewed coffee (134-240 mg per 8 oz serving). The problem is that most cans contain 2-3 servings, often raising the caffeine intake to over 300 mg per can! Assuming that an adolescent consumes 3 cans per day, caffeine intake can easily exceed over 900 mg (comparable to 9 cups of coffee!)
  • Research has suggested that 400 mg or more of caffeine per day can result in nervousness, irritability, sleeplessness, increased urination, abnormal heart rhythms, decreased bone levels, and upset stomach.
  • Herbs such as guarana and ginseng can enhance the effects of caffeine. Guarana actually contains caffeine and adds to the total amount. Many of the herbs added to the energy drinks do not have the research based evidence to back up their functional claims.
  • Mixing alcohol and energy drinks can be a dangerous combination. Individuals on this mix are more alert but just as intoxicated. In addition, caffeine and alcohol are both diuretics, increasing the likelihood of dehydration and cardiovascular problems.
  • A study in the Journal of College Health suggests that energy drink consumption is associated with risk taking behavior such as unprotected sex, substance abuse and violence. Researchers point out that the findings don’t mean the drinks cause the behaviors, rather over consumption should be a red flag for parents that their children might be more likely to take risks.
  • A study of 78 youth (11-18 years) found that 42.3% of participants consumed energy drinks.
  • Although some beverages are sugar-free, in many the sugar content is comparable to soft drinks (30 g per 8 oz serving). However, since cans often contain 2-3 servings, sugar content could be as high as 90 g per can (equivalent to about 22.5 teaspoons of sugar)! Considering the high rates of obesity, this is another reason to moderate consumption.

Source: Nutrition and Health Info Sheet, produced by Karrie Heneman, and Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr, Nutrition Science Specialist, Cooperative Extension, University of California- Davis at http://anrcatalog.ucdavis.edu/pdf/8265.pdf

Writer: Dan Remley, Assistant Professor, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness

Reviewer: Susan Zies, Assistant Professor, Extension Educator

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Halloween Health and Safety Tips

Autumn holidays like Halloween and Harvest Day are fun times for children of all ages. They can dress up in costumes, enjoy parties, try fall fruits and vegetables and eat yummy treats. These celebrations also provide a chance to give out healthy snacks, to be active and to focus on safety.
Check out these tips to help make the festivities fun and safe for trick-or-treaters and party guests.

Going trick-or-treating?

  • Swords, knives, and similar costume accessories should be short, soft, and flexible.
  • Avoid trick-or-treating alone. Always walk in groups or with a trusted adult.
  • Fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see you.
  • Examine all treats for choking hazards and tampering before eating them. Limit the amount of treats you eat.

 

  • Hold a flashlight while trick-or-treating to help you see and others to see you. Always WALK; don’t run from house to house.
  • Always test make-up in a small area first. Remove it before bedtime to prevent possible skin and eye irritation.
  • Look both ways before crossing the street. Use established crosswalks wherever possible.
  • Lower your risk for serious eye injury by not wearing decorative contact lenses.
    Only walk on sidewalks whenever possible, or on the far edge of the road facing traffic to stay safe.
  • Wear well-fitting masks, costumes, and shoes to avoid blocked vision, trips and falls.
  • Eat only factory-wrapped treats. Don’t eat homemade treats made by strangers.
  • Enter homes only if you’re with a trusted adult. Only visit well-lit houses; don’t stop at dark houses; and, never accept rides from strangers.
  • Never walk near lit candles or luminaries. Be sure to wear flame-resistant costumes.

Halloween

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expecting guests?

Follow these tips to help make the festivities fun and safe for everyone:
• Provide healthier treats for trick-or-treaters such as low-calorie treats and drinks. For party guests, offer a variety of fruits, vegetables, and cheeses.
• Use party games and trick-or-treat time as an opportunity for kids to get their daily dose of 60 minutes of physical activity.
• Be sure walking areas and stairs are well-lit and free of obstacles that could result in falls.
• Keep candle-lit jack o’lanterns and luminaries away from doorsteps, walkways, landings, and curtains. Place them on sturdy tables, keep them out of the reach of pets and small children, and never leave them unattended.
• Remind drivers to watch out for trick-or-treaters and to drive safely.

Written by: Polly Loy, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Belmont County.
Reviewed by: Kathy Dodrill, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Washington County
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – http://www.cdc.gov/family/halloween/

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Autumn

Stress often gets a bad rap. In small doses, stress serves as a motivator to get things done.  It also gives us the ability to run faster and think more quickly when facing an emergency. Yet, if you’re constantly running in emergency mode, your mind and body pay the price.

Protect yourself by recognizing the signs and symptoms of stress and taking steps to reduce its harmful effects. Long-term exposure to stress can lead to serious health problems. Chronic stress disrupts nearly every system in your body. It can raise blood pressure, suppress the immune system, increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, and speed up the aging process.

Many health problems are caused or exacerbated by stress, including:

  • Pain of any kind
  • Heart disease
  • Digestive problems
  • Sleep problems
  • Depression
  • Weight issues
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Skin conditions, such as eczema

Managing stress is about taking control and taking charge. Take charge of your emotions, thoughts, schedule, and your environment.  Strengthening your physical health will help you cope with the symptoms of stress.

There are a number of techniques that are useful to reduce stress. Here are a few of these ideas:

  • Set aside relaxation time
  • Exercise regularly
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Get plenty of sleep

Find something that calms you and get in the right mindset to face these challenges. Managing your stress will bring balance to your life.  While we may not be able to control all the stressors in our lives, we can change how we react to them!

Writer: Beth Stefura, MEd., RD, LD, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Mahoning County.

Reviewer: Liz Smith, M.S. RDN,LD, NE Regional Program Specialist, SNAP-Ed

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Autumn is a wonderful time to celebrate agriculture in America with the harvest of many of the crops that feed the world. Studies show that the average American farmer feeds approximately 155 people. To celebrate the harvest and teach your family more about where their food comes from and how it is grown, why not learn more about agriculture and local food through:

  • Visit to the local Farmers Market where you can actually talk with the grower http://search.ams.usda.gov/farmersmarkets/. Asking questions about which apple is best for baking, eating, or making homemade applesauce for example.
  • Touring a farm – be it a dairy farm, historic farm, Amish farm, driving tour, or even an alpaca farm; there are many different types to choose from. Or watch for a farm safety day to be held in your area.
  • Going to a “You Pick” farm to pick your own pumpkins or apples.pumpkin patch
  • Seeking out the nearest corn maze http://www.cornmazesamerica.com/. Be sure to wear sturdy walking shoes, casual clothes, bug spray, and bring a flash light. Check to see if the maze is recommended for teens, adults or small children.
  • If visiting a farm isn’t easy for you, include books about agriculture or farming when reading to your children – here are a few lists of books to start with http://ofbf.org/uploads/BookAwardWinners_handout14.pdf or http://www.agday.org/education/reading.php . You may want to pick up one new agriculture inspired book each time you go to the library.
  • Or encouraging your family to turn off electronic devices during your next car trip and playing old fashioned seek and find games. Who can see the next tractor, cow, horse, red or white barn, field of corn or pumpkins, apple orchard, hog, combine, wagon, lamb, goat, or other agriculture inspired item? My family has done this for years. Typically the person who found the last item lists the next item to look for. We all laughed hysterically when my young daughter said llama and a few miles down the road there were two in a pasture.
  • And keeping your eye out for agriculture inspired poster, writing, poetry, or coloring contests. Many Farm Bureau organizations or other agriculture groups sponsor these contests for children to promote farming and food. Prizes may range from small to larger items like gift cards or scholarships.

Celebrate the harvest and local foods this fall and any time of year by trying one of these family activities.

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Cindy Shuster, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County.

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Are you stressed out about everythinniXkZzog and anything? Does your life lack direction and focus? Are you trying to get more done with less time and fewer people to help? Well, I believe it’s never too late to challenge yourself to become more effective and efficient in everything you do. NOW is the time to learn about yourself and develop those habits and skills which will help you to choose your destiny!

Which “quotes” will inspire you?

Find inspirational quotes which will get you moving and post them at locations where you will see them often such as your work desk, refrigerator, entrance to your home, car, computer, etc. In the words of Oliver Wendell Holmes, “The great thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving.” Booker T. Washington knew what he was talking about when he said “Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome.”

What do you value and believe in?

It’s important to reflect upon, appreciate and acknowledge what is important to you in your life. How would you rank the following on a value and belief system: Family; Friends; Work; Home; Spirituality; Community; Relationships; Self-Awareness; Education; Happiness; Helping Others; etc.?

What are some important Time and Life Management Tips?

  • Choose Your Attitude and make it positive and proactive.
  • Set Goals which lead to a successful and productive life.
  • Make a Priority List because not everything is of equal importance.
  • Analyze and Evaluate to determine where your time and life are going.
  • Plan to “Get It Done” with intent and determination.
  • Keep to a Schedule as your way of keeping a promise to your commitments.
  • Eliminate Interruptions as much as possible.
  • Condense Paperwork so you aren’t surrounded by stacks and stacks of it.
  • Delegate to others and involve them in the process of getting things done.
  • Do Not Procrastinate because everything will eventually hit at the same time.
  • Create a Team that works together and pulls in the same direction.
  • Select Values and Principles which are appropriate for you and your family.
  • Be Efficient with tasks.
  • Be Effective with people.
  • Seek Positive Relationships which build you up.
  • Avoid Negative Relationships which tear you down.
  • Choose Quality over Quantity so that you do your best at fewer things.
  • Develop Character which makes others want to be like you.
  • Become a Leader within your family, friends and community.
  • Live in Harmony with as many people as you can.
  • Put “First Things First” and make good choices about what comes first in your life.
  • Maintain Balance by using important Time and Life Management Tips.

What’s one final thought about Time and Life Management?mhGuFx6

Remember that you don’t have to know exactly where you’re going every single second to be headed somewhere great!

 

Written by: Janet Wasko Myers, Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, Ohio State University Extension, Madison County, myers.31@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

Source:

Time and Life Mastery – Putting First Things First, Developed by Kurt Utterback, Presented by Communicate Institute Training and Development in partnership with Walsh University, North Canton, Ohio, Graduate courses for teachers, WEB: www.communicateinstitute.com/

 

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Need more energy? Have this energy drink. If you are playing a sport, you need a sports drink. Really, do we need sport or energy drinks, vitamin waters, or fruit flavored drinks? The advertisers claim we need them. What is truth and what is hype? sports beverages

• Sports drinks are not necessary unless you are engaging in continuous, vigorous activity for more than 60 minutes in hot weather. Most sports drinks have lots of sugar and calories. Most of us don’t need the extra nutrients, electrolytes and/or protein as your diet usually provides what is needed. Water is the best drink for rehydrating, which is what your body needs. Sports drinks increase the risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, dental caries and cardiovascular disease. Low-fat or fat-free milk can be a better option to drink when engaging in sports or physical activity to regain what you have lost.

• Energy drinks are not needed and may over-stimulate the cardiovascular and nervous system causing some detrimental effects. Most energy drinks have high amounts of caffeine and other stimulates. Energy drinks can be dangerous for people with unknown heart issues. Energy drinks are not safe for youth. In fact, studies have shown youth who drink energy drinks are less able to concentrate and may have a slower reaction speed. Extra vitamins in energy drinks do not really help your body. Energy drinks have been associated with many health concerns such as increased blood pressure, sleep problems, seizure activity, heart arrhythmia and others. Avoid powdered caffeine which is very dangerous.

• Vitamin waters have added vitamins which are better obtained by eating vegetables and fruits. These drinks also contain added sugar and sodium. Don’t pay the high price tag for these which also increase the risk of obesity. Eat a healthy diet and drink water.

• Fruit flavored drinks tend to be high in added sugar and other ingredients. Some of the herbal fruit flavored drink ingredients have not been researched on children. These drinks also increase the risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, dental caries and cardiovascular disease.glass of iced tea

• Sweetened teas and coffee drinks have added sugar and carry the same health risks as sports drinks. They also can cause sleep disturbances and nervous problems in youth and adults.

Beverage manufactures are trying to convince us that they are providing us with “ready-to-go” attractive beverages. Most of the health claims on the bottles cannot be proven true and the added sugars increase the risk of diabetes and obesity.

Drink water!
It is the best drink. Other recommended choices include nonfat or low-fat milk and 100% fruit or vegetable juice in small amounts. Eat a healthy diet, and you will have the vitamins and minerals you need to stay healthy.

Writer: Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension
Reviewer: Susan Zies, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension

References:
Center for Weight and Health, (2014). Hiding Under a Health Halo, University of California at Berkeley, Available at: http://www.publichealthadvocacy.org/healthhalo.html
Nelson, J. and Zeratsky, K. (2010). Milk Joins the Roster of Sports Drinks, Mayo Clinic, Available at http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-blog/sports-drinks/bgp-20056125
Nutrition Action, (2014). Caffeine in Food – Caffeine Content of Drinks Revealed! Available at http://nutritionaction.com/daily/caffeine-in-food

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super foods

From Brussels sprouts and blueberries to salmon and sweet potatoes, there is a lot to learn about super foods! OSU Extension professionals will be sharing information on what makes some foods “super” and how to work super foods into your diet.

date

Follow and chat with the Live Healthy Live Well team…

Lisa Barlage – Family & Consumer Sciences Educator @lbarlage

Linnette Goard – Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection and Management @lmgoard

Polly Loy – Family & Consumer Sciences Educator @WellnessWakeup

Dan Remley – Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness @remley4

hashtag super

 

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