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Archive for January, 2014

heart attack

Heart disease is an epidemic as the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports around 715,000 Americans suffer a heart attack each year. While chest pain is recognized as a major heart attack symptom, there are other major symptoms that need to be recognized.

Heart Attack Defined

A heart attack usually occurs when a blood clot blocks the flow of blood through an artery that feeds blood to the heart. This may cause permanent damage to the heart muscle if not treated quickly. The most common cause of heart attacks is atherosclerosis or the buildup of plaque in the arteries. Less commonly, heart attacks can also occur as a result of very low blood pressure, drug use, a tear in the heart artery and small blood clots that travel to the heart from other parts of the body. Understanding the typical and not so obvious symptoms when a heart attack is occurring can be a matter of life and death.

Symptoms of a Heart Attack

• Severe chest pain, pressure or tightness in the middle of the chest that lasts for
more than a few minutes or goes away and then comes back; sometimes mistaken for
heartburn
• Shortness of breath
• Pain that spreads to shoulders, neck, arms or jaw
• Cold sweat or sweating
• Feeling of indigestion, choking or heartburn
• Nausea or vomiting
• Feeling dizzy, light-headed or extremely weak
• Rapid or irregular heart beats

Warning signs for Women

• Sudden onset of weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting,
indigestion, body aches or overall feeling of illness
• Unusual feeling or mild discomfort in the back, chest, arm, neck or jaw without chest
pain
• Sleep disturbance

Always call 911 when you begin to have any symptoms of a heart attack. The key is to listen to your body and seek immediate medical treatment.

Written by: Beth Stefura, M Ed, RD, LD. Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, Crossroads EERA, stefura.2@osu.
Reviewed by: Cynthia R. Shuster, CFLE, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, Buckeye Hills EERA, shuster.24@osu.edu
Reviewed by: Jennifer Lindimore, Office Associate, Ohio State University Extension, Morgan County, Buckeye Hills EERA, lindimore.1@osu.edu

Resources: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/911-Warnings-Signs-of-a-Heart-Attack_UCM_305346_SubHomePage.jsp

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It’s flu season!   Best protection is handwashing.  Regular soap?   Or antibacterial soap?  Does antibacterial provide extra protection against getting sick?  soap on hands

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) isn’t sure antibacterial really makes any difference.  In fact, the FDA is proposing companies need to provide more evidence antibacterial soaps are more effective, than just washing with plain soap and water in preventing illnesses.  The FDA also wants more data on the safety of using antibacterial soaps.

Some of the chemical ingredients in antibacterial soaps are associated with risks that may outweigh any benefits.  Some ingredients may increase the bacterial resistance to antibiotics and cause hormonal changes in our bodies.

Many liquid soaps contain the chemical triclosan.  Although this chemical is not known to harm humans, it may change the way hormones work in our bodies, according to some animal studies.  Laboratory studies have shown concern with triclosan causing bacteria resistance to antibiotics.  One positive way triclosan is effective is in preventing gingivitis, when it has been added to toothpaste.  Thus, the FDA would like more studies and evidence triclosan is safe and effective.  The Environmental Protection Agency also has some concerns with triclosan and is collaborating with the FDA.

Adding to this concern is recent data indicates we are exposed to these chemical ingredients more than previously thought.  Thus, increasing our risks with regular use over time.

How do you Drug label on soapknow if your soap is antibacterial?  Most products are labeled with the word “antibacterial.” Look for a Drug Facts Label which is required on antibacterial soap or body wash.   You can also check the ingredients.   Cosmetics do not have to carry a Drug Facts Label, so you will need to check the ingredients.

Regular soap or antibacterial soap?  Try regular soap and remember to use warm water, rub hands together for at least 20 seconds, rinse well and dry.  Handwashing is a key to staying healthy.

Writer:  Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension

Reviewer:  Beth Stefura, M Ed, RD, LD, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension

References:

United States Food and Drug Administration, [2013].  FDA Taking Closer Look at ‘Antibacterial’ Soap, FDA Consumer Health Information, Available at http://www.fda.gov/consumer

WebMD, [2013].  Triclosan: What Consumers Should Know, WebMD, Available at http://www.webmd.com/fda/triclosan-what-consumers-should-know

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wallet

“What’s in your wallet?” is a great marketing program for a credit card but with all jokes aside; do you really know what is in your wallet or purse?  I bet you don’t!  Take the challenge.  Sit down with a pen and paper and make a list of everything in your wallet.  Do you know your vehicle tag number, credit card numbers, driver’s license number, savings and checking account numbers?

When your purse, wallet or credit card information is lost or stolen, time is the most important thing. A thief will immediately start to use your checks or credit cards.  So, while you are at home looking for credit card numbers they are spending your money as fast as they can.  But there are some things you can do to ease the headache caused by the loss or theft of your wallet or purse.

  • Photocopy every card, front and back.  Include all cards including:  credit, debit, car insurance, medical insurance, and Social Security.  On the photocopy write the contact number under each card.
  • Make a list of everything you have in your purse, including all the cards, checkbook, cell phone, and camera.
  • Beside each item include account numbers, contact numbers, serial numbers, make  of item, and a description.
  • List the keys on your key chain.  Store duplicates safe at home.
  • Put a copy of your list and the photocopy in a file at your office and one at home.
  • Immediately call the policeThis will prove to credit providers that you were diligent. Then call your bank, credit card companies, Department of Motor Vehicles,  Social Security, cell provider, and insurance companies.

Carry Smart.  Do you really need all that stuff in your purse?  With proper ID you do not need to carry your credit cards with you while shopping. Never carry important papers in your purse such as your birth certificate, Social Security card or passport.  Keep an eye on your purse at all times.  It only takes a second for someone to walk by and slip your purse out of the cart. In addition, men should consider carrying their wallets in their front pockets if walking in crowded areas. This will make it harder for pickpockets.

You may not be able to totally protect yourself from a sly, criminal determined to steal your purse or wallet but taking some time today to make an inventory of its’ contents will save you hours of frustration and time if you do become a victim.

Author: Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University, Butler County/Miami Valley EERA, green.1405@osu.edu.

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County/Heart of Ohio EERA

Sources:

FDIC Consumer News 6/1/2004

http://www.fdic.gov/CONSUMERS/CONSUMER/news/cnspr04/atm.html

McKinney, C, Ph.D., Know Your Valuable Papers: What and Where  http://ohioline.osu.edu/pdf/l237.pdf

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After viewing a few television shows about the new trends in dining and hot eats – it got me wondering how it would influence my own choices as I prepared foods or choose to eat out in the coming months. Several of the trend lists I viewed were from surveys by the National Restaurant Association, insights from Technomic (a leading food service research firm), and The Food Channel. I found it interesting that a number of the trends fit well with the themes we are promoting through Ohio State University Extension. Here are my favorites:

  • Locally grown in all types of foods including produce, meats, and dairy. Extension has been promoting local foods for several years in Ohio. By buying local, you support your local economy, and you have the opportunity to learn from your local farmer or restaurant how the food was produced and harvested. To learn more about this effort go to http://localfoods.osu.edu/.vegetables
  • Children’s nutrition and more healthful meals for children. This goes back to more vegetables, fruits, and less processed foods. I hope that means restaurants will get on board with the work that many of us have been doing for years (Health Departments, State Government, and our First Lady included).  A national Extension team that I contribute to is working on this topic, so check out our work on eXtension at http://www.extension.org/healthy_food_choices_in_schools.
  • A Midwestern Food Movement is also found in restaurants and with newer television programming and recipe books. Of course growing up in Ohio, I know this is a true, we have good food! Think root vegetables, fresh foods from the garden, catfish, dairy products, pork (goes back to the Chicago hog processing from days past), and many of the traditional comfort foods.
  • Clean eating or not over processed foods is the final restaurant trend I want to focus on. Attempt to eat foods in their natural state; avoid preservatives; reduce salt and try herbs; eat whole grains rather than refined; and use natural fats like olive, canola, or walnut oil. This ties in well with locally grown and the Midwest movement.

This look at the new trends in food and dining has brought forward several messages that are good for all of us – look for foods in their natural state, buy fresh and local when you can, and encourage children to eat these foods by setting a good example. What are you doing to be part of this movement?

Sources:

Technomic, https://www.technomic.com/Pressroom/Releases/dynRelease_Detail.php?rUID=262.

The Food Channel, http://www.foodchannel.com/articles/article/2014-top-ten-food-trends-part-i/.

Ohio State University Extension, Local Foods, http://localfoods.osu.edu/ and Ohio Direct Marketing: Food and Agriculture, https://u.osu.edu/fox.264/.

Author: Lisa Barlage, MS, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, barlage.7@osu.edu.

Reviewer: Daniel Remley, MSPH, PhD, Assistant Professor, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu.


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Most Americans need to lower their sodium intake. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 1,500 mg of sodium per day; however, the current national average daily intake far exceeds the recommendation. The national average intake is about 3,400mg sodium per day. So, where is the salt intake coming from?  Processed foods contain the majority (77%) of the salt we consume. This chart breaks down the different food categories, showing a clearer picture of where the majority of Americans are getting their sodium from on a daily basis. It is surprising how much sodium we get from yeast breads, which is something that many people would not think about when asked to name a high sodium food.

sodium graph

Fast food items are frequently high in sodium. It is reported that only 6% of the sodium that Americans consume comes from salt added at the table and 5% is added during cooking time.  According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, a large amount of the sodium Americans get in the diet comes from only 10 types of foods. These 10 foods are

  1. Breads & rolls
  2. Cold cuts and cured meats
  3. Pizza
  4. Fresh and processed chicken and turkey
  5. Soups
  6. Sandwiches
  7. Cheese
  8. Pasta dishes with sauce
  9. Mixed meat dishes, such as meat loaf with sauce
  10. Snacks such as chips, pretzels and popcorn

When we look at this list of the 10 types of foods, it is evident that many of the items are heavily processed.

Here are 4 tips to help you cut out sodium:

  1. Make more meals from scratch.  One of the best things one can do to cut back on sodium is to prepare more meals from scratch, vs. relying on prepackaged processed foods.
  2. Use herbs and spices for added flavor instead of salt.
  3. Eat more fresh veggies.  If fresh vegetables are not in season or if the price is too high, canned varieties are a good substitute; but be careful on sodium intake.  Rinse canned vegetables thoroughly before cooking or consuming. This will cut the sodium, and they will still have a good taste.
  4. Stay hydrated every day. By drinking proper amounts of fluid, sodium can be flushed out of the body, as long as the kidneys are working properly.

If you would like to read more about strategies for eating less sodium, I would highly recommend American Heart Association’s new book, Eat Less Salt.  Check out the link for this book: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/General/American-Heart-Association-Eat-Less-Salt-Sample-Recipes_UCM_452096_Article.jsp#

Written by:  Susan Zies, Extension Educator, FCS, Wood County, Erie Basin EERA

Reviewed by:  Cheryl Barber Spires, RD LD, Program Specialist, SNAP-Ed, West Region

Source:

“Sodium, Salt and Our Food Supply.” Eat Less Salt: An Easy Action Plan for Finding and Reducing the Sodium Hidden in Your Diet with 60 Heart-healthy Recipes. New York: Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2013. N. pag. Print

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saladWas your New Year’s Resolution to eat healthier in the New Year?  If so, you are not alone.  Many people set improved nutrition and increased physical activity as goals.  One way to improve nutrition is to eat more fruits and vegetables.  Adding more salads to your meals or making a meal out of a salad is a way to increase your consumption of fruits and vegetables.  But, are all salads healthy?  It really depends on how you build it – it could be 100 calories or it could be 1000 calories.  Choose wisely!

How to Build a Salad

USE

LIMIT

STAY AWAY

Fresh or frozen vegetables

Meats – limit to 2 oz.

Full fat salad dressing

Fresh or frozen fruits

Hard cooked egg – limit to 1/2

Olives

Herbs and spices in place of salt

Reduced or low-fat cheese – limit to 1 oz.

Pickled products

Dry beans and peas (cook from dry or rinse to remove excess sodium)

Imitation bacon bits

Macaroni, potato and other creamy salads

Low-fat whole grain breads

Low-fat salad dressing

Pudding

Whole grain rice, bulgur or couscous

Crackers and croutons

Gelatin made with sugar

Source:  Build a Better Salad Bar, Child Nutrition and Wellness, Kansas State Department of Education, July 2012.

Author:  Linnette Goard, Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection and Management, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, goard.1@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Cheryl Barber Spires, R.D., L.D., Program Specialist, SNAP-Ed, Ohio State University Extension, West Region, spires.53@osu.edu

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Oak Trees In the Snow at Dawn

We have all been shivering through the latest spell of nasty cold weather that is impacting much of the country. While temperatures may be rising a bit – anything over 20 seems balmy right now – we know that cold weather will be around for a while.  Let’s take a minute to think about ways that we can keep ourselves and our family safe.

What should you wear?

  • hat
  • scarf or knit mask to cover face and mouth
  • sleeves that are snug at the wrist
  • mittens (they are warmer than gloves)
  • water-resistant coat and shoes
  • several layers of loose-fitting clothing

Be sure the outer layer of your clothing is tightly woven, preferably wind resistant, to reduce body-heat loss caused by wind. Excess perspiration will increase heat loss, so remove extra layers of clothing whenever you feel too warm. Also, avoid getting gasoline or alcohol on your skin while de-icing and fueling your car or using a snow blower. These materials in contact with the skin greatly increase heat loss from the body.

 What should you eat?  We might not think that what we eat could be important to fight the dangers of cold weather, but it can be.

· Eating well-balanced meals will help you stay warmer.

· Do not drink alcoholic beverages—they cause your body to lose heat more rapidly. Instead, drink warm, sweet  beverages such as hot chocolate to help maintain your body temperature.

· If you have any dietary restrictions, talk to your doctor.

Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.

  • Hypothermia occurs when the body gets cold and loses heat faster than the body can make it. Someone should seek medical attention immediately if they have symptoms of hypothermia, including confusion, dizziness, exhaustion and severe shivering.
  • Watch for symptoms of frostbite, including numbness, flushed gray, white, blue or yellow skin discoloration, numbness, or waxy feeling skin. Frostbite refers to the freezing of body tissue (usually skin) that results when the blood vessels contract, reducing blood flow and oxygen to the affected body parts. Normal sensation is lost, and color changes also occur in these tissues.
  • Children and older adults are especially susceptible to these conditions. Keep an eye on them as they may not be aware that they are in danger

Remember your pets
· Bring them indoors if at all possible

· If they have to remain outside, provide shelter to keep them warm and make sure they have access to water that will not freeze.

These do’s and don’ts are common sense reminders that will help keep us safe and healthy even when mother nature is not cooperating!

Written by: Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@sou.edu

Reviewed by:  Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, Treber.1@osu.edu

Sources:
http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/duringstorm/outdoorsafety.asp

http://www.webmd.com/first-aid/tc/hypothermia-and-cold-temperature-exposure-topic-overview

http://www.webmd.com/first-aid/understanding-frostbite-basics

http://www.redcross.org/news/article/Red-Cross-Offers-Safety-Steps-for-Extreme-Cold

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