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Archive for March, 2016

yogurt1If you are like a lot of people, you’ve probably spent some time standing in front of the yogurt section of the dairy aisle, wondering what kind of yogurt to purchase. There are so many options to choose from that it can literally feel a little overwhelming. How is Greek yogurt different from regular yogurt? Is it worth the extra expense? Let’s take a look.

Both yogurts contain two primary ingredients–milk and bacterial cultures. The bacteria ferment the lactose (milk sugar) in the milk, producing lactic acid. After fermentation is complete, the liquid “whey” is strained off the solid yogurt. Regular yogurt is strained twice, leaving a little liquid in the end product (which is what you see accumulated on the top of your yogurt when you remove the lid). Greek yogurt is strained three times, removing most of the liquid. That extra straining is what gives Greek yogurt a thicker consistency (and stronger flavor) compared to regular yogurt.

Because so much liquid volume is lost through that third straining it takes about four cups of raw milk to produce one cup of Greek yogurt. In comparison, it only takes one cup of raw milk to make a cup of regular yogurt, which helps explain the higher cost associated with Greek yogurt.

Greek yogurt contains more protein and less carbohydrates, making it a better choice for diabetics. But no matter which type you select, read the food label. Compare types based on:

  • PROTEIN: A typical 6-ounce Greek yogurt has 15 to 20 grams, which is the same as 2-3 ounces of lean meat. Regular yogurt provides about 9 grams.
  • FAT: There’s fat in yogurt? Yes, depending on the type of milk used. Full-fat Greek yogurt packs 16 grams of saturated fat—or 80 percent of your total daily allowance in a 7 ounce container. Regular full-fat yogurt has 5 grams of saturated fat in an 8-ounce serving. If you’re going Greek, stick to low-fat and fat-free versions.
  • SODIUM: Greek yogurt is much lower in sodium than regular yogurt, making it a healthier choice if you’re watching your salt intake. One cup of Greek yogurt contains 65 mg of salt, while the same size cup of regular yogurt contains 159 mg of salt.
  • CALCIUM: Regular yogurt provides 30 percent of the federal government’s recommended daily amount. A 6-ounce cup of Greek yogurt typically supplies about 20 percent of the daily recommendation.
  • SUGAR: Sugar content is usually higher in regular yogurt, but much depends on additional ingredients added such as fruit and/or granola-type toppings.

Final Thoughts

Yogurt is an important probiotic, adding live bacterial strains to your colon that enhance and support your microbiome. No matter which type you choose, your body wins from that perspective alone. But experiment with the different types and flavors until you find one that fits both your nutritional and taste criteria.

Sources:

 http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/ask-the-expert/ask-the-dietitian/archives/what-is-the-best-kind-of.html

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/diet-fitness/diet/articles/2011/09/30/greek-yogurt-vs-regular-yogurt-which-is-more-healthful

Writer: Marie Economos, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Trumbull County.

Reviewer: Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County

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IMG_5553One fourth or 25% of a typical person’s daily calories come from snacking. It’s simple to see why choosing healthful snacks are important for all ages.  Smart snacking can help curb hunger between meals and prevent overeating during meals. According to the NPD Group’s Snacking Research study, Baby Boomers outweigh Millennials when it comes to eating ready-to-eat snacks. Boomers consume ready-to-eat snacks 20% more often than Millennials. NPD’s research shows, “annual consumption of ready-to-eat snacks per Boomer is about 1,200, for a total of 90.4 billion annual snack eating events. Boomers tend to eat snacks versus a big meal, because many may not want to eat alone. Whereas Millennials consume the ready-to-eat snacks because they are hungry.

Both groups’ top picks for ready to eat snacks were fruit, chocolate, and potato chips. Fruits are an excellent choice for snacks.They are low in calories, rich in nutrients and fiber, and can be economical especially when purchased in season from a local market.   A calorie comparison was done among 20 fruits and vegetables with 20 conventional snack food items (such as chocolate, cookies, potato chips). Results showed that fruits and vegetables provided an average of 56 calories per snack size portion, compared to a whopping 180 calories for the conventional snack foods. Fruits and vegetables had three times LESS calories!

Here is an easy 10 minute snack recipe that will appeal to both Millennials and Baby Boomers! It has 118 calories, 1 gram of fat, 4 grams protein and 3 grams fiber.

BATIDO SMOOTHIEusdarepci

Prep time: 10 minutes

Makes: 4 Servings

This refreshing smoothie is a blend of papaya, banana, and yogurt and makes a satisfying part of breakfast or any time of day. Mix in frozen or fresh berries for a variety of flavors.

Ingredients

2 cups papaya chunks (fresh or frozen)

2 bananas (overripe, sliced)

1 cup plain low-fat yogurt

1 cup ice cubes

Directions

  1. Put all the ingredients in the blender.
  2. Put the lid on tightly. Turn the blender to a medium setting and blend until the ice is chopped and the mixture is smooth, about 1 minute.
  3. Serve right away or cover and refrigerate up to 4 hours.

Notes

  • One cup of low-fat milk, soy, rice, almond or coconut milk can be used instead of yogurt.
  • Strawberries, blueberries, or raspberries can be used in addition to or instead of papaya.

Sources:

https://www.npd.com/wps/portal/npd/us/news/press-releases/2016/millennials-have-nothing-on-boomers-when-it-comes-to-snacking/

https://www.whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/recipes/myplate-cnpp/batido-smoothie#

Written by: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Family Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu

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alert day 1

Did you know that tomorrow is American Diabetes Association Alert Day?

On March 22, I encourage you to take a quick (and anonymous) one-minute test to find out if you are at risk for type 2 diabetes. Plus, I hope you will share the test with everyone you care about, including family members, friends, and colleagues.

Diabetes is a serious disease. Nearly 30 million children and adults in the United States live with it. More than a quarter of them—8 million—don’t even know they have it and aren’t getting the medical care they need.

It’s estimated that another 86 million people have prediabetes, which puts them at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which a patient has elevated levels of blood glucose but does not yet meet the criteria for Type 2 diabetes.  However, patients with prediabetes are still at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.  This condition is listed as a risk factor for mortality and has been labeled by some as “America’s largest healthcare epidemic”.  Through lifestyle changes of improved diet and exercise, prediabetes patients can significantly decrease their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes in Ohio

According to 2013 data from the Ohio Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), it is estimated that 10.4 percent (921,012) of Ohio adults have been diagnosed with diabetes. In addition, it is estimated that another 7.2 percent (378,153) of Ohio adults have been diagnosed with prediabetes, increasing their risk of progressing to Type 2 diabetes later in life. (Source: 2013 Ohio Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.)

Your family health history is an important risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes.  Most people who have Type 2 have a close family member with the disease.

Knowing your family health history is important because it gives you and your health care team information about your risk for type 2 diabetes.

alert day 2

Please make sure to mark your calendar for American Diabetes Association Alert Day on March 22 and take the type 2 Diabetes Risk Test.  It will only take a minute!!!

 

Sources:

American Diabetes Association, http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/alert-day/?loc=atrisk-slabnav and http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/?loc=alertday

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/community-outreach-health-fairs/planning-health-fair/Documents/Pre_Diabetes_EN_SP_508.pdf

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/ndep/am-i-at-risk/family-history/four-questions/Pages/four-questions.aspx

Ohio Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2013)

Ohio Department of Health,

http://www.healthy.ohio.gov/diabetes/odpcp.aspx

Ohio Diabetes Prevention and Control Program,  http://www.healthy.ohio.gov/~/media/HealthyOhio/ASSETS/Files/diabetes/FactSheet_2012_Final.pdf

 

Writer: Tammy Jones, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Reviewer: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County, carter.413@osu.edu

 

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You have probably heard about the increasing number of children who are overweight and the efforts to decrease the trend. 5-2-1-0 Let’s Go! is a national childhood obesity prevention program which focuses on policy and environmental changes to increase physical activity and healthy eating for children through age 18. Let’s Go! works with youth and families through a collaboration of six sectors including schools, early childhood, communities, workplace, out of school and healthcare.  While the initiative originated in Maine through the Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital, communities across the nation have implemented the program.

 

The goal of the campaign is to change unhealthy behaviors and adopt healthier habits. While the primary target is youth, people of all ages can benefit from the guidelines.  Strategies are evidence-based and the messages are consistent and simple:

  • Eat 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day
  • Spend 2 hours or less of screen time – television, smart phone, video games, etc.
  • Enjoy 1 hour or more of physical activity each day
  • Consume 0 sweetened beverages per day, such as soda, juice and energy drinks

5-2-1-0 graphic

Graphic courtesy of Keys for Healthy Kids

Collaboration is key to the success of the program in any state. Teams of nutrition, health and education specialists develop trainings to provide to partners within the community setting.  Some of the successful strategies that have worked for Maine and Florida include:

Engage community partners to support healthy eating and active living

Prohibit food being used as a reward

Implement staff wellness programs that incorporate physical activity and healthy eating

Provide water rather than sugar-sweetened beverages

Limit unhealthy snacks provided for celebrations, offering healthy snacks instead

In 2015, more than 350,000 children and their families living in Maine were reached through 5-2-1-0 Let’s Go! Future opportunities of the program may be extended to parents in the home environment and disabled children.

 

Sources: The Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital, 5-2-1-0 Let’s Go! http://www.letsgo.org/

Florida Health, Palm Beach County, http://www.5210letsgo.com/

Jennifer Even, Family and Consumer Sciences/EFNEP, Ohio State University Extension, Hamilton County

Reviewer:  Shannon Carter, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County

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CampingEvery year around this time my daughter and I start looking at camps that she wants to attend over the summer. Sending your child to camp can be overwhelming for the first time. When picking a camp think about your child’s interests. You may also want to consider your family finances. How much can you afford to spend on the camp? Are there special items you need to purchase for the camp?

To have a successful camp experience, remember to include your child in the decision making process. Check out the camp website – you should be able to see pictures of the area and activities which will help your child get excited about going to camp. If there are reviews by campers, take time to read them.

American Camp Association suggests you consider these things before enrolling your child:
• What locale do we want to consider? (mountains, ocean, distance from home)
• Do we want a traditional camp that gives my child a wide variety of experiences or do we want a specialty camp that focuses on a particular activity or set of skills?
• What size enrollment will make my child feel comfortable?
• How rustic do we want the camp to be?
• How structured do we want the program to be?
• Does my child want lots of choice in the activity schedule?
• Is my child ready to sleep away from home for an extended stay? This will help you to select either a resident or day camp setting.
• What session length will appeal to my child and to our family plans for the summer? (One week? Two weeks? Eight weeks?)
• How can we stay in touch with my child during camp? Does the camp allow mail, phone calls, texting or e-mail? Does the camp have parent visitation days?
• How will the camp meet my child’s special dietary or physical needs?
• What is my budget for camp tuition? Remember, many camps offer financial aid.

There are many things to consider when selecting a camp. Think about your family, your child and their needs and interests before registering. Make the camping experience a positive way for your child to gain independence, learn new skills, and make new friends.

Happy Camping!last day of camp

Source:
American Camp Association
http://www.acacamps.org/

Writer: Brenda Sandman-Stover, Program Assistant, 4-H and Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Greene County, sandman-stover.1@osu.edu

Reveiwer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

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If you’ve ever had that 5:00 panic as you get home from work and wonder what in the world you’re going to feed your family for supper… you’re not alone. Most folks either enjoy meal planning or dread it, but for busy families it is a must. Planning your meals can save you time and money and help you serve healthier food. The neat thing is that there is more than one way to do it.

Here are some tips from Iowa State University Extension:

Check items you have in your refrigerator, freezer and cupboards that need to be used, and plan your menus using these items first.

Serve what they like. When you serve food your family likes, you avoid waste. Gather low-cost, nutritious recipes that your family likes and serve them regularly.

Consider your schedule. When creating your menus and shopping list, think about how much time you will have to prepare the meal on a particular day. If it’s a slow week, make meals ahead and freeze them. If it’s a busy week, use some of the meals you froze earlier or just keep it simple with foods that require little preparation.

Check newspaper ads. Look at local store ads to find sales. As you become familiar with the costs of regularly purchased items, you will be able to quickly identify good deals.

Balance your menus. Use MyPlate as a guide to include foods from all the groups: Vegetable, Fruit, Grain, Dairy and Protein. For more help in planning, tracking and analyzing your diet, check out USDA’s SuperTracker.

meal planning

Get inspired. Sometimes you might need some inspiration or new recipes. You can find healthy low-cost recipes here. You might also trade dinner ideas with friends and co-workers or use ‘theme night’ meals like Taco Tuesday or Sandwich Saturday. Ethnic foods can open a whole new set of recipes… try Italian, Asian, Mexican, even Thai.

Involve your household. Kids can help choose menus, pick a new vegetable or fruit to try, set the table or even help with simple food prep.

Print a copy of the 5-day meal planning worksheet to get you started.

Hopefully you learned a helpful tip, or maybe you have one to share… feel free to comment.

Sources:

Iowa State University Extension http://www.extension.iastate.edu/foodsavings/page/meal-planning-basics

Recipes http://www.extension.iastate.edu/foodsavings/recipes/all

USDA MyPlate http://www.choosemyplate.gov

Written by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County

Reviewed by: Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County

 

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DiabBracelet3

You have a medical emergency and no one knows your history. They base your treatment on your vitals and condition – but maybe they don’t know the medications you take or a disease you may have. My sister, Debbie was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes when she was 4 years old. One of her biggest fears is that she will have low blood sugar and the medical team treating her thinks it is high blood sugar and treats her with the wrong medication.

It could be deadly. How can we prevent this mishap? Here are some suggestions to get you started:

    • Keep It With You – Personal Medical Form. Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you “Keep It With You” (KIWY) by using this Personal Medical Information Form. This form is intended to be a voluntary and temporary record that lists health information for people who need care during disasters. It also could be handy in the event you are in an accident. This simple form can provide reliable information about you or your family member.
    • Use an App! – My Smart phone has a Health App that can be accessed even in an emergency. If your phone is locked, and you are in an accident or medical crisis, anyone can open this app and see basic medical information as well as emergency contacts. Take a minute right now to locate and open this app. At the minimum put in your name, medical conditions, allergies, date of birth, medications, and emergency contacts. How thoughtful of Nurse Julia Thompson to share this tip in an article and Facebook post. If you have an android phone, list emergency contacts under ICE – In Case of Emergency. If you don’t want to use an App, you can also list your name as the owner of the phone and include basic information. Select the option to share this information when phone is locked.
    • Wear it – wear a medic alert bracelet or tag. My sister has several options she can pick from to clip her medical alert bracelet to a different strand of beads.
    • Put a Card in Your Wallet – My sister has this card front and center in her wallet. It clearly states that her blood should be tested before treatment.

What’s next? Take 5 minutes to update your phone, find the app, list your emergency contacts, and medical conditions. If the paper path suits you better, print and fill out the Keep It With You form available from CDC. If you have a medical emergency, make it easier for medical personnel to contact your family.

Photo Credit: Debbie Klinger

Sources:

http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/kiwy.asp

http://sfglobe.com/2016/01/13/nurses-iphone-tip-could-save-your-life-in-an-accident/?src=fbfan_48603&t=fbsfg

http://m.610wtvn.iheart.com/onair/joel-riley-1870/hospital-employee-shares-iphone-tip-that-14344248/

Writer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

 

 

 

 

 

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