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Archive for August, 2017

In Buckeye land it is time for football games, tailgating or viewing parties. With those parties often comes heavy snacking. Why not start the season off right by making the switch to healthier food choices for future parties?  We are each responsible for making a few food or drink choices for the next party that we host or attend to help everyone maintain a healthier (not heavier) diet. 

When you plan your party keep in mind that a few healthy options can go a long way in contributing to the health of all Buckeyes (or Bobcats, Bengals, Browns, Bearcats, Cavaliers, Flyers, Monsters, Zips, Falcons, Flashes, or your home town team).

  • Start your party prep by purchasing a medium size plate, I know those tray size plates seem like they should be wonderful, but often contribute to over-eating or waste (you take something, but don’t eat it).
  • Plan beverages so you can serve infused water rather than soda. Make ice cubes or rings out of fruit in your team colors.
  • Switch burgers to leaner meats and serve them on whole grain slider buns. The bun switch alone can save you 180 calories.
  • Always serve fresh veggies and fruits with a low-fat dip.
  • Serve pizza with vegetable or fruit toppings; limit the extra meats and cheeses. If you are making your own consider a whole grain crust.chili-2
  • Modify your chili to include 2 types of beans, turkey sausage, diced sweet potatoes, and chopped peppers.
  • Serve quesadillas on whole grain tortillas, filled with chopped vegetables and low fat cheese.
  • Serve grilled chicken breasts or lean pork loins.
  • Switch your chips or pretzels to baked, veggie, or whole grain.

Don’t forget to be food safe at your tailgate or party too! Use coolers or tubs of ice to keep cold food cold on those first warm fall games. Ensure that grilled meats reach safe temperatures by using a meat thermometer: ground beef or ground pork should reach 160 degrees, all poultry 165 degrees, and steaks or chops 145 degrees.

We can’t wait to hear what you will be serving at your next tailgate. If you are looking for ideas here are a few http://go.osu.edu/healthtailgate. Comment with your healthy tailgate tip or recipe.

Sources:

Alabama A & M, Auburn University: http://news.aces.edu/blog/2016/10/05/host-healthy-tailgate-season/

University of Washington, https://www.washington.edu/wholeu/2014/09/30/healthytailgatefoods/

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2014/10/09/vanderbilt-health-educator-offers-tips-for-healthy-tailgating/

Army HEALTH, http://blog.armyhealth.pbrc.edu/post/Healthy-Tailgating

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer:  Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fayette County.

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garden

As long as you don’t add gobs of sugar, fat and salt to your garden produce, they will be some of the healthiest fruits and vegetables in your kitchen. However, there are ways to store, preserve, and prepare them so that they can even be healthier.

Phytonutrients are natural compounds derived from plants that can have health benefits when consumed. As opposed to nutrients, omission of phytonutrients in the diet will not cause deficiency symptoms, but including them can have additional health benefits. Some examples include anthocyanins in berries, capsaicin in peppers, and carotenoids in melons, carrots, tomatoes, sweet corn, green leafy vegetables, and green beans.

Nutrients and phytonutrients in the diet are important to our health because they often neutralize harmful substances called free radicals which are thought to be culprits of chronic disease such as heart disease and cancer. They are also helpful in preventing or slowing down inflammatory processes also linked with chronic disease. If you already live with a chronic disease such as diabetes, consumption of fruits and vegetables can help prevent or delay complications such as eye, kidney, or nervous system diseases.

Fruits, vegetables, and their combination of nutrients and phytonutrients likely play a role in preventing or delaying the development of age-related chronic diseases, like cancer and cardiovascular disease. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommend that most people consume 2 cups of fruit and 2.5 cups of vegetables per day.

How Cooking or Preserving Can Impact the Nutrition of your Harvest

Cooking and preservation exposes the fruit or vegetable to heat, oxygen and light, all which can degrade nutrient and phytonutrient levels. How do you maximize the levels in your food? Keep reading:

  • Boiling—Shorter cooking time minimizes nutrient loss. Consume cooking water or save for later, such as in soups or for cooking rice.
  • Steaming—Minimal contact with water helps retain water-soluble nutrients. Light steaming improves the availability of nutrients and phytonutrients.
  • Sautéing—Lower temperatures and shorter cooking times minimize nutrient loss. Lack of water during cooking reduces loss of water-soluble nutrients. A small amount of oil can increase availability of carotenoids.
  • Roasting or grilling—Compared to other cooking methods with lower temperatures, may result in a higher nutrient loss.
  • Canning—Can improve absorption of lycopene (a carotenoid) from tomatoes. Can cause loss of vitamin C.
  • Freezing—Results in high nutrient retention. Blanching (briefly boiling) can have small loss of heat-sensitive and water-soluble nutrients.
  • Drying—Loss of all water-soluble nutrients, but retains fiber. To maximize nutrient and phytochemicals, a different preservation method is advised.

What’s in your Garden? Nutritional Powerhouses!

Your garden produce have many health promoting vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. USDA’s MyPlate model suggests that consuming a variety of fruits and vegetables is a key to good health, since nutrients often work together.

Vegetables

  • Beets have significant sources of folate, potassium and phytonutrients called betalains, compounds that may prevent the development of heart disease and certain cancers.
  • Cruciferous vegetables (leafy vegetables, broccoli) contain vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, and phytonutrients called glucosinolates. Many of these compounds may provide cancer protection, especially for the bladder and prostate.
  • Green beans and pea pods have vitamin A, vitamin C, folate and phytonutrients including carotenoids, chlorophyll, polyphenols and saponins. These compounds may prevent development of heart disease and cancers.
  • Sweet corn contains vitamin C, niacin, and carotenoids. The compounds in sweet corn are antioxidants and have been demonstrated to slow digestion and control blood sugars.
  • Tomatoes contain vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, potassium, and carotenoids. Tomatoes may provide protection from heart disease and certain cancers, especially prostate.
  • Green leafy vegetables contain vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin K, vitamin B6, riboflavin, folate, magnesium, iron, calcium and potassium. Phytonutrients include carotenoids and polyphenols. Compounds in leafy vegetables may prevent cancers and promote bone health.
  • Peppers have vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, carotenoids, phenolics, and capsaicin. Compounds found in peppers may provide cancer protection and improve cholesterol.
  • Winter squash, pumpkins and carrots contain vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin K, vitamin B6, potassium and carotenoids. These compounds are antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory. Health benefits include possible cancer protection and blood sugar control.

Fruits

  • Apples, pears and peaches have vitamin A, vitamin K and the phytochemical quercetin, which are all anti-inflammatory.
  • Berries contain vitamin C, vitamin K, and have the phytonutrients anthocyanins and ellagitannins. Many of these are anti-inflammatory compounds and are thought to provide cancer protection, especially of the mouth, esophagus, intestine and prostate.
  • Melons contain vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B6, folate, potassium, carotenoids and polyphenols. These compounds may prevent the development of heart disease and certain cancers.

Source: Ohioline Factsheet HGY 5581: Farm to Health: Maximizing Nutrients and Phytonutrients in Ohio Produce. Retrieved on 8/27/2017 from https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-5581

Author: Dan Remley, PhD, Assistant Professor, Field Specialist, OSU Extension

Reviewer: Susan Zies, Assistant Professor, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Wood County

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opioid picReaching a national emergency, the opioid crisis is affecting communities from the smallest burg to the largest urban setting. Approximately 90 people in the United States pass away daily from an opioid-related overdose, and the numbers are increasing.

There seems to be a story in the news every week showing addicts slumped over in their cars or a young child in the street seeking help for a parent that has overdosed in the home. Ohio estimates the state will see 10,000 overdoses by the end of 2017.

Opioids are medications used to relieve active or chronic pain. These prescription medications include oxycodone, hydrocodone (Vicodin) and codeine. When abused, even a single large dose may cause an overdose or death.  Regular, long-term use of opioids can lead to physical dependence and/or addiction.

Prescription opioid addiction may then lead to heroin addiction, which is easier to obtain and cheaper to purchase. Heroin is a very addictive drug and is processed from morphine. Many heroin addicts turn to the narcotic drug after losing access to prescription pain medication.

Signs of opioid or heroin abuse include:

  • Constricted, pinpoint pupils
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Nodding out
  • Itching and scratching
  • Use of laxatives
  • Weight loss
  • Track marks on arms
  • Unhealthy appearance
  • Sudden changes in behavior
  • Problems in school
  • Loss of interest
  • Time away from home
  • Finding Ziploc bags
  • Finding spoons with burn marks
  • Disappearance of spoons
  • Aluminum foil with burn marks
  • Purchases returned for refund
  • Bottles of vinegar and bleach
  • Cotton balls
  • Missing money
  • Theft of household valuables

What can you do?

Be proactive. Lock up your medications and take inventory to record the name and amount of medications you currently have in the house.  Check regularly to make sure none is missing.  Educate yourself and your child about the most common abused medications, sedatives, stimulants and tranquilizers.

Communicate with your child the dangers of abusing these medications. Set clear rules and monitor frequently.  Be sure your child understands they are not to take prescription medications without a prescription.  Lead by example!  Share your knowledge, experiences and support with friends and parents.  Work together to ensure the safety of your children.

Last, but not least, dispose of old, leftover medications correctly. Many police departments have disposal bins for those types of medications.  Don’t just throw medications in the trash, down the drain, or flush down the toilet. Water treatment plants can’t remove all traces of drug residue from your drinking water.  A 2008 Associated Press investigation found pharmaceuticals in the drinking water supplies of at least 41 million Americans in 24 major metropolitan areas.

Dealing with the addicted person.

If you suspect your loved one may be using opioids, be open and non-judgmental in your conversation. Treat them as individuals, do not make assumptions, and do not move too fast.  Remind them you love them, are concerned, and are here to listen. Encourage them to seek treatment from professionals who are knowledgeable and skilled in treating drug abuse problems.

References:

https://whttp://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/narcotic-pain-medications#1ww.asam.org/advocacy/toolkits/opioids

https://web.extension.illinois.edu/unusedmeds/whatarethey/unwantedmedicine.cfm

Written by: Beth Stefura, OSU Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Mahoning County, Stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Donna Green, OSU Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

 

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I used to spend a lot of time walking when I suffered my back injury, and it was a saving grace. I always knew walking was a great way for anyone to be active safely, regardless of their fitness level, but it was never something I put dedicated time into, at least until I herniated a disc. Walking was pretty much the only form of exercise I could do at that point, and it was the only thing that helped to relieve my back pain.

walking-349991_1920

It stretched all of my muscles out regularly and helped to keep my back muscles strong before undergoing surgery. Walking has many more benefits than this though and can definitely be part of any healthy daily routine. Remember to discuss increasing your physical activity level with your health care provider.

Walking is a low impact form of exercise that nearly everyone can do. Aim for 10,000 steps each day, which equates to almost 5 miles! It may seem like a lot, but reaching this step goal daily is very doable, especially if you incorporate a dedicated walk into each of your days. Take a walk during your lunch break, suggest a walking meeting, walk your dog, or explore a new park with a friend. Check out your local animal shelter; many have a need for a volunteers to walk the shelter dogs. There are also plenty of free walking groups available in communities everywhere, so be sure to check yours to find a walking group near you! Can you find ways to make walking fun and doable?

The Surgeon General has recently made a call to action for all of us to walk more. Walking has been shown to improve overall health in a number of ways. It can help to lower blood pressure, strengthen muscles, keep blood sugar better regulated, and can even help us to lose some body size when we walk consistently enough. These benefits and more can be achieved just by walking a little more each day. We all have to start somewhere, so whether you walk 5 miles or 15 feet that first day, it’s still better than sitting all day long. Just adding a few more steps each day will have you hitting 10,000 steps in no time!

There’s no better time than the present to start walking and leading a healthier life. My husband and I love to take our dog for long walks, and he loves it too. Ever since my back injury, when I truly learned the importance of walking, we have made it a priority in our everyday lives. Hopefully you can find a place and buddy to walk with that helps you to love walking as much as we do!

Sources:

https://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/calls/walking-and-walkable-communities/index.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14715035

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.proxy.lib.ohio-state.edu/doi/10.1111/hsc.12424/full

Rives, David. Walk Yourself Fit. 2015.

 

Author: Amy Meehan, MPH, Family and Consumer Sciences Healthy People Program Specialist, Ohio State University Extension, State Office, meehan.89@osu.edu

 

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

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all-is-wellWhat comes to mind when you hear the terms well or wellness? For most people, these words bring thoughts of physical health. Some of you will think about mental health. Most people, when given time, realize that there is more to being well than just physical and mental health. Some may even be able to name several areas of wellness. Many people may not realize that there are actually eight dimensions of wellness, though.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the eight dimensions of wellness are:

  1. Emotional—Coping effectively with life and creating satisfying relationships
  2. Environmental—Good health by occupying pleasant, stimulating environments that support well-being
  3. Financial—Satisfaction with current and future financial situations
  4. Intellectual—Recognizing creative abilities and finding ways to expand knowledge and skills
  5. Occupational—Personal satisfaction and enrichment from one’s work
  6. Physical—Recognizing the need for physical activity, healthy foods, and sleep
  7. Social—Developing a sense of connection, belonging, and a well-developed support system
  8. Spiritual—Expanding a sense of purpose and meaning in life

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For about a month, I have been participating in a program offered through my employer/health insurance to help increase my emotional well-being. There are up to five areas that anyone who participates can choose to complete. Each area has suggestions for things you can do. For example, one challenge is to find. Some things listed include: going to the library to check out a book or DVD, attending a live event or stopping by a new coffee shop. It is fun trying to complete each challenge. It also helps remind me that even on those hectic days, I need to take some time to take care of myself.

There are small and simple things you can do to help become more well in each area. Here are some examples:

  • Emotional—unplug from phone, social media and your computer for 10 minutes each day, light your favorite candle and make time for friends and family
  • Environmental—keep your office and home clean and organized, find a favorite place or spot to visit and get involved in cleaning up your community or neighborhood
  • Financial—shop at thrift stores, limit unnecessary spending and develop a budget
  • Intellectual—read for pleasure, choose creative hobbies and participate in local/community events
  • Occupational—attend conferences to stay current in your profession and explore opportunities for growth and advancement
  • Physical—participate in regular exercise/physical activity that you enjoy, eat balanced, nutritious meals and snacks and get adequate sleep
  • Social—be genuine with others, join a club or organization and use good communication skills
  • Spiritual—volunteer, pray, meditate or find a quiet place for self-reflection

You may be wondering how well you really are. Take this assessment to get a better idea. After completing it, you can figure out which areas you need to work on and in which ones you are already strong. Click here for additional information and resources on how to strengthen your dimensions of wellness.

Author:  Misty Harmon, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Perry County

Reviewer:  Michelle Treber, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, Pickaway County

References:

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2016). The Eight Dimensions of Wellness. Available at https://www.samhsa.gov/wellness-initiative/eight-dimensions-wellness

http://umatter.princeton.edu/sites/umatter/files/media/wellness-self-assessment.pdf

Roddick, M. (2016). The 8 Dimensions of Wellness:  Where Do You Fit In? Available at https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/8-dimensions-of-wellness-where-do-you-fit-in-0527164

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While on a recent family vacation in another state, my sister ended up in the Emergency Department at a hospital. She had multiple fractures in her foot and ended up in a cast up to her knee. This injury was the result of her long term Type 1 Diabetes. She recently had a heart stent put in and had been walking about a mile a day – for her heart health. Little did she know that she had multiple fractures in her foot. Now it made sense that her foot swelled so much each evening.

This experience showed us the kindness of strangers that I want to share. We experienced several random acts of kindness during this time. Research shows that random acts of kindness and generosity increase happiness in the giver. The medical staff fit her with crutches and instructed her to keep weight off her foot. This sounds like an easy task but it can be challenging to maneuver crutches. She was able to get around but still struggled with the crutches.

Kindness

The next day she wanted to sit at the pool by the beach to watch family members parasail. If you are mobile, this is easy, just walk in and sit by the pool. It isn’t so easy if you are on crutches. But…. we experienced another act of kindness – a little boy (approximately 10 years old) stood there holding the gate until my sister could get in. A puddle of dirty pool water was inside the gate; his sister saw it, took her towel, and dried the cement so that Debbie didn’t get her cast wet. I looked at the mother and said she doesn’t have to do that with her towel – their mother said, “that’s ok” and let her do it. I was so touched that they knew the importance of being kind to a stranger. Someone in their family taught them to think of others.

Another instance we experienced included having a Physical Therapist Assistant ask if we needed help with the crutches as my sister made her way to the restroom on our drive home. She said the crutches are not the right height for her and asked if we wanted her to adjust them so that they fit. We said, “of course, we need all the help we can get” and she sat down on a bench, took the crutches and adjusted them on the spot. This made it so much easier to maneuver. We told the PT Assistant thanks for asking and she said sometimes she isn’t sure if she should interfere – we told her, yes! Her act of kindness helped us and we were grateful.

Another act of kindness included people holding the doors open as we struggled to move around with the crutches. This happened many times over our last few days of vacation.

Why is it important to share these experiences? As parents or grandparents, you can foster kindness in children. This short YouTube video featuring Dr. Christine Carter, “Raising Kind Kids” from Greater Good Science Center UC Berkeley shares a few key suggestions to encourage kids to be kind.

Are you ready to experience happiness by giving to others? Take this “Random Acts of Kindness” Challenge by doing 5 random acts in one day. Record how you feel and comment on their page. Another fun option is to pass out these Smile Cards. Complete an act of kindness, leave the Smile Card and keep the spirit going!

What are you waiting for? Try kindness today!

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Tammy Jones, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Sources:

Breines, J., Three Strategies for Bringing More Kindness into Your Life, retrieved from: https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/three_strategies_for_bringing_more_kindness_into_your_life

Carter, C., Raising Kind Kids, Greater Good Science Center, University of California, Berkeley, YouTube retrieved from: https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/video/item/raising_kind_kids

Random Acts of Kindness Challenge, Greater Good in Action, University of California – Berkeley’s Greater Good Center, retrieved from: UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center.  http://ggia.berkeley.edu/practice/random_acts_of_kindness

Smile Cards, KindSpring.org retrieved from: http://www.kindspring.org/smilecards/

 

 

 

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Watermelon… it is almost synonymous with summer. Juicy, sweet, colorful and versatile, this nutrition-packed fruit is the perfect treat on a hot day. Read on to learn more facts about watermelon…

NationalWatermelonDayHeader

Nutrition

Red watermelon is a good source of lycopene, a phytonutrient that gives watermelon its color. Lycopene may reduce the risk of heart disease and a growing list of cancers.

Watermelon is also rich in vitamin C. In fact, just 1 cup of watermelon provides about 20 percent of our daily vitamin C needs. Vitamin C may reduce the risk of arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and some cancers.

To get the maximum amount of nutrients:

  • Pick melons when they are fully ripe. This prevents losses of vitamin C and carotenoids while waiting to ripen.
  • Consume melons within 5‐7 days of bringing them home.
  • Store melons whole and slightly below room temperature.
    • Once cut, leftover melon needs to be stored in the refrigerator, although storing melons cut‐up decreases vitamin C and carotenoids. Freezing melons preserves vitamin C but causes losses of other vitamins and phytonutrients.

Selection: How do you pick a good one?

Ohio State University Extension offers these tips for Selecting Ohio Melons:

  • “Examine the spot where the melon has been resting on the ground. A yellow-white spot indicates ripeness—white or pale green suggests immaturity.
  • Scratch the surface of the rind with your thumbnail. If the outer layer slips back with little resistance showing the green-white under the rind, the watermelon is ripe. Scratching unripe melons only leaves a darker depressed line.
  • Choose a melon with a smooth surface, dull sheen, and well-rounded ends.
  • Some experts recommend a “hollow” sound when tapped indicates ripeness. Others feel that “thumping” will not necessarily get you a ripe melon.
  • White seeds usually indicate the melon was picked too early.”

Fun Facts from the Watermelon Board:

  • Watermelon is 92% water.
  • Watermelon’s scientific name is Citrullus Lanatus of the botanical family Curcurbitaceae. It is a cousin to cucumbers, pumpkins and squash.
  • According to Guinness World Records, the world’s heaviest watermelon was grown by Chris Kent of Sevierville, Tennessee in 2013, weighing in at 350.5 lbs.
  • The United States currently ranks 6th in worldwide production of watermelon.
  • By weight, watermelon is the most-consumed melon in the U.S., followed by cantaloupe and honeydew.
  • Early explorers used watermelons as canteens.

For more information and tasty recipes using watermelon, check out these websites:

The Watermelon Board

USDA Mixing Bowl

Sources:

Selecting, Storing and Serving Ohio Melons (PDF|342KB). Ohio State University Extension.

Recipes with Watermelon. USDA Mixing Bowl.

The Watermelon Board

 

Written by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County, carter.413@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

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