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Archive for the ‘Healthy Finances’ Category

When your pet ingests a toxin, time can be of the essence. Immediately contacting the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 24-hour hotline (1-888-426-4435) will give you and your veterinarianpetsan potentially life-saving information regarding the treatment of your loved one.

 

 

To protect your pet, we recommend that you follow these simple guidelines:

  • Always follow instructions on the label of prescription medications.
  • Never give your pet any of your prescription or over-the-counter                            medications unless explicitly instructed to do so by a veterinarian.
  • Keep common household cleaning products safely stored away from pet access.
  • Prevent access to the garbage by keeping a tight lid on all cans or store out of reach of your pets.
  • Only have your home treated with chemicals that are nontoxic to pets.
  • Seek emergency care if your pet has ingested a toxin.

During the holidays, there are other things that should be of special concern to our pets, Here are some of the things that might be “eye-catching” to your pet during the holiday season?

  • Alcohol (including eggnog & punch)Bones (chicken & turkey)
  • Car enginesoutdoor cats seek warmth
  • Christmas treescats climb and like ornaments & tinsel, strands of lights,      stagnant or fertilized tree water, pine needles
  • Chocolate
  • Confetti
  • Electrical cords & wires
  • Grapes & raisins
  • Lighted candles
  • Outdoor hazardsantifreeze, frostbite, frozen water bowl (outdoors), rock salt, sub-zero temperatures
  • PlantsChristmas cactus, lilies, holly
  • Ribbons, bows & giftwrap
  • Rich foods
  • Sugar-free desserts/gum (with Xylitol)
  • Trash cans with discarded/moldy foods

Remember to always work in partnership with your family veterinarian.

Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions; they pass no criticisms.  –George Eliot

 Adapted by:  Janet Wasko Myers, Program Assistant, Horticulture, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, myers.31@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, green.1405@osu.edu

Sources:

Information is provided by The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center.  Contact The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center at:  http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/  (614) 292-3551, 24/7 Operating Center.

The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine at:  http://vet.osu.edu

Protect your Pet from Household Hazards at:  http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/owner-education/protect-your-pet-household-hazards

General Safety info pdf and HolidaySafetyHazards.pdf at the bottom of the page at:  http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/owner-education/protect-your-pet-household-hazards

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opioid picReaching a national emergency, the opioid crisis is affecting communities from the smallest burg to the largest urban setting. Approximately 90 people in the United States pass away daily from an opioid-related overdose, and the numbers are increasing.

There seems to be a story in the news every week showing addicts slumped over in their cars or a young child in the street seeking help for a parent that has overdosed in the home. Ohio estimates the state will see 10,000 overdoses by the end of 2017.

Opioids are medications used to relieve active or chronic pain. These prescription medications include oxycodone, hydrocodone (Vicodin) and codeine. When abused, even a single large dose may cause an overdose or death.  Regular, long-term use of opioids can lead to physical dependence and/or addiction.

Prescription opioid addiction may then lead to heroin addiction, which is easier to obtain and cheaper to purchase. Heroin is a very addictive drug and is processed from morphine. Many heroin addicts turn to the narcotic drug after losing access to prescription pain medication.

Signs of opioid or heroin abuse include:

  • Constricted, pinpoint pupils
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Nodding out
  • Itching and scratching
  • Use of laxatives
  • Weight loss
  • Track marks on arms
  • Unhealthy appearance
  • Sudden changes in behavior
  • Problems in school
  • Loss of interest
  • Time away from home
  • Finding Ziploc bags
  • Finding spoons with burn marks
  • Disappearance of spoons
  • Aluminum foil with burn marks
  • Purchases returned for refund
  • Bottles of vinegar and bleach
  • Cotton balls
  • Missing money
  • Theft of household valuables

What can you do?

Be proactive. Lock up your medications and take inventory to record the name and amount of medications you currently have in the house.  Check regularly to make sure none is missing.  Educate yourself and your child about the most common abused medications, sedatives, stimulants and tranquilizers.

Communicate with your child the dangers of abusing these medications. Set clear rules and monitor frequently.  Be sure your child understands they are not to take prescription medications without a prescription.  Lead by example!  Share your knowledge, experiences and support with friends and parents.  Work together to ensure the safety of your children.

Last, but not least, dispose of old, leftover medications correctly. Many police departments have disposal bins for those types of medications.  Don’t just throw medications in the trash, down the drain, or flush down the toilet. Water treatment plants can’t remove all traces of drug residue from your drinking water.  A 2008 Associated Press investigation found pharmaceuticals in the drinking water supplies of at least 41 million Americans in 24 major metropolitan areas.

Dealing with the addicted person.

If you suspect your loved one may be using opioids, be open and non-judgmental in your conversation. Treat them as individuals, do not make assumptions, and do not move too fast.  Remind them you love them, are concerned, and are here to listen. Encourage them to seek treatment from professionals who are knowledgeable and skilled in treating drug abuse problems.

References:

https://whttp://www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/narcotic-pain-medications#1ww.asam.org/advocacy/toolkits/opioids

https://web.extension.illinois.edu/unusedmeds/whatarethey/unwantedmedicine.cfm

Written by: Beth Stefura, OSU Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Mahoning County, Stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Donna Green, OSU Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

 

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It’s hard to believe that summer is coming to an end.  The family day trips to the amusement park or zoo, and our time lazing around the pool will soon be over until next year. Do you find the transition from summer into the routines of the school year school-1549880_1920difficult? I find that I sometimes struggle with the back-to-school schedule more than my two children (who are now a freshman and a sophomore in high school). Because of my struggles, I want to share some tips from Kids.gov  and USA.gov. Both sites create and organize timely, needed government information and services that is accessible anytime, anywhere, via your channel of choice.

  • Ease into the School Routine
    • Start going to bed and waking up on a schedule similar to the school year. Remember that teens need 9-10 hours of sleep per night, school age children need 10 hours and preschoolers need 11-12 hours.
    • Make a family docking station in the living room or kitchen for mobile phones and electronics.  By not allowing these in the bedrooms, teens and pre-teens will get a better night’s sleep.  You can also set a house rule that phones may not be checked until the morning routine is complete. Purchase a cheap alarm clock if you hear,  “I need to have my phone/tablet/etc. in my room because it has my alarm on it.”
  • Teach Time Management
    • Routine is very important. Talk to your children and set a daily schedule together and follow it.  Don’t forget to include wake-up, showering, teeth brushing, homework, (outdoor) play time/physical activity, screen-time, reading together, family meals, and bed time. If something unscheduled comes up, see if other things can be adjusted to accommodate it.
    • Use pictures for your preschoolers and early readers and a checklist for the pre-teens and teens. Don’t forget to agree upon the outcomes if the schedule is followed (a special privilege) or if it is not (a consequence). Your weekend schedule will most likely be different so map that out too.
  • Pack a Nutritious Lunch
    • A well-balanced meal will help provide the nutrients to get through the long days.
    • It helps to allow your children choices when packing their lunch.  Allow them to pack their lunch (and even yours), so that together your family is making the choice to eat healthier.
  • Listen
    • Talk to your children about what’s coming up in the next few weeks.  Talk through the schedule and the changes that will be happening as school starts. Listen to their excitement and their fears. Make a plan together for having the best school year yet.
    • Don’t forget to check in with them each day and listen for what they say (and what they don’t say, especially with the pre-teens and teens).
  • Shop Smart
    • Pick up the school supply list now and take advantage of the many sales and coupons that are available.  Use your mobile device to download coupons and always ask if a store has any coupons available.  Check the closets before you head out shopping and only purchase what you need.  
    • Take advantage of  Ohio’s tax free weekend for more savings: August 4-6.

Good luck getting back into the swing of the school year. May your school year be blessed with many wonderful memories! Enjoy every teachable moment and find something fabulous in each day!

Written By: Jami Dellifield, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Hardin County

Reviewed By: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County

Sources:

https://kids.usa.gov/parents/health-and-safety/back-to-school/index.shtml

https://www.usa.gov/features/get-ready-for-school-8-tips-for-parents-from-kid

s-gov

https://www.freetaxweekend.com/ohio-tax-free-weekend/

http://health.uncc.edu/news/electronic-devices-may-hamper-teens%E2%80%99-sleep

https://www.cps-k12.org/families-students/health-wellness/healthy-lunches/teens/lunches

Photo:

https://pixabay.com/en/school-holidays-recovery-leisure-1549880/

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Fruits & Veggies

We are entering that wonderful time of the year when local farmers’ markets are open, roadside stands pop up and even local grocery stores offer plentiful displays of fresh, local fruits and vegetables. With all of this bounty, sometimes the question arises on how to choose the most flavorful, ripe product. You will want to choose fruits and vegetables at the peak of their freshness for the best flavor and nutritional value.

Here are some helpful hints to remember when you are shopping:

  • Look for fruits or vegetables that have the shape, size and color that are usually thought of for the item. Remember though, they don’t have to be perfect to be good! That tomato or pepper that is slightly misshapen should be just as tasty and nutritious as its perfect neighbor.
  • Avoid fruits/vegetables with obvious bruises or discoloration. These spots will spoil quickly. If you notice a spot after you bring the produce home, cut out the bad spot and use as soon as possible.
  • Feel the item. If it is very soft it may be overripe; if it is too hard, it hasn’t ripened enough to eat yet. Melons can be especially difficult to choose. Here is great information on choosing ripe melons.
  • Smell! Fruits/vegetables that have the characteristic aroma associated with the item should be ready to eat. Think fresh peaches!

Not all vegetables and fruits will continue to ripen once they have been harvested.

  • Tomatoes, unripe melons, and tree fruits such as pears, peaches and nectarines should be kept at room temperature to ripen. They will get sweeter and more delicious.
  • Grapes, berries, and cherries won’t get better while sitting out, so they should go into the refrigerator right away.
  • Other fruits, like citrus, could sit out for a day or two but then should also be put in the refrigerator.
  • Most vegetables should be refrigerated when harvested or purchased. Some exceptions would be onions, garlic and potatoes.

Don’t forget about food safety with your fresh produce!

  • Always wash your fresh produce before using.
  • Some fruits and vegetables are better stored in the refrigerator before you wash them. Items such as beans and berries are more likely to spoil if stored damp. Be sure and brush off as much dirt as possible before storing. Place them in bags to keep them from contaminating other food in your refrigerator and them wash well when you are ready to eat them.
  • All produce should be rinsed under cool running water. Do not use soap or bleach as the residue left on the produce could make you ill.

Fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthy diet. By buying fresh, seasonal items at the peak of their freshness and having them available to eat makes it easier to incorporate them into our daily diet.

Written by:  Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Franklin County. Rabe.9@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Michelle Treber Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Pickaway County. treber.1@osu.edu

https://articles.extension.org/pages/19886/storing-fruits-and-vegetables

http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-5523

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/washing-food-does-it-promote-food-safety/washing-food

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smartphone-1894723__340
Many of us share our cellphone number without a second thought.   Yet, our cellphone number is linked to private information maintained by many companies and business transactions conducted with our cell phone. These include medical records, business contacts, social networks, banks and money lenders.  These companies look at patterns to determine what we might buy, check online, or even watch on television.

Unlike our Social Security number, our cellphone number does not have to be kept private by companies.  We have learned we need to protect our Social Security number and not give it out randomly.  However, if asked most of us share our cellphone number without a second thought, especially if we are completing a business form.

Unlike a home phone number that many people shared, the cellphone is an individual number for one person.  Youth may have the same cellphone number for the rest of their lives, making it easy for someone to get lots of information quickly.  Austin Berglas, a former F.B. I. agent said a cellphone number is often more useful than a Social Security number, as the cellphone number is tied to so many databases, and the device is almost always with you.   No one else will ever be given the same Social Security number you have, but if you give up your phone number it will probably be resigned to someone else.  That person could get text messages for you using that phone number.

Many banks, payment systems like PayPal and other companies are using text messages with a temporary personal identification number to give people a way to borrow money or purchase an item.  This is a convenient feature for cellphone use, but what happens if the information is stolen?  .

What can we do to protect our phones?  These are some recommendations from some experts:

  1. Always have a strong password or use the fingerprint available on newer phones. Don’t share your password.
  2. Create a PIN number for your mobile phone account.
  3. Use the device auto-lock feature, so it is not staying open.iphone-37856__340
  4. Only download apps from your trusted app store.
  5. Set up remote wipe which can remotely wipe clean your phone if you lose your device.
  6. When on public WIFI, use a VPN.
  7. Update your phone and apps when updates are available. Don’t delay.
  8. Opt for the built-in encryption feature on your phone or install one.

A new app “Sideline” allows you to add a second number to your cellphone which you can give out instead of your personal number.  I am not experienced with this feature, but it could provide an option.  Think twice before you give out your cellphone.  Give them a work number instead, if possible.

Author:  Pat Brinkman, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Fayette County

Reviewer:  Beth Stefura, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Mahoning County

References:

Coombs, C. (2016). The Latest Identity Theft Target: Your Cell Phone, Techlicious.  Available at http://www.techlicious.com/tip/everything-you-need-to-know-about-cell-phone-account-identity-theft/#.WIYcAKe3GkE.email

Lohr, S. (2016). A 10-Digit Key Code to Your Private Life:  Your Cellphone number.  The New York Times   Available at:  https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/13/business/cellphone-number-social-security-number-10-digit-key-code-to-private-life.html?_r=0

Stringfellow, A. (2016). Cell Phone Security  30 Tech Experts Share Important Steps to Securing Your Smartphone.  TCC Verizon  Available at https://www.tccrocks.com/blog/cell-phone-security-tips/

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Stethoscope on cashIf you are lucky enough to have elderly parents, you know what a precious gift it is to have them. However, with this precious gift of time, there are some challenges that occur as they age and need your help. It is difficult when the roles of parent and child begin to shift and the children become the caregivers. One of the most complicated issues is when there is a need to take over your parents’ finances. Taking control can be awkward and complicated, but putting it off too long can make it very difficult to sort out all of their accounts and make the necessary legal steps to ensure your ability to successfully manage your parent’s money.

How do you know when it is time to step in? Watch for early signs that your parent’s cognitive ability is declining, and there is a need to step in and take control. If you wait too long, there’s a good chance that significant financial losses have occurred. Some of the signs to look for are:

  • They become forgetful about cash
  • They start getting calls from creditors
  • Their house is filled with expensive new purchases
  • They have difficulty with simple tasks like balancing their checkbook
  • Bills have been paid repeatedly or not paid at all
  • Bills that seem much higher than they should be and cannot be explained
  • Donations to charity that do not match your parents priorities

 

Raising the topic might be difficult. Older adults may be resistant to relinquishing control of their finances. They may see this as the first step of losing their independence, which is one of the top two concerns for older adults. Prepare to Care: A Planning Guide for Families from AARP gives helpful insight on how to start the conversation. They suggest:

  1. Look for an opening: You might use an article you read about or something you saw in the news to raise the topic.
  2. Respect your loved one’s wishes: Your plan must be centered on the person receiving care.
  3. Size up the situation: Figuring out your loved one’s priorities help determine your next steps
  4. Counter resistance: Your loved one might say, “I just don’t want to talk about it.” Some people are private by nature. If your first conversation does not go well, try again.

Managing your own finances can be challenging enough, and you aren’t excited about taking on the task of managing your parents finances as well. Addressing the topic can be awkward, but if no one steps in to help, the assets that your parents spent a lifetime accumulating could be lost.

 

Written by: Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County

Reviewed by: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County

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listIt’s hard to believe that we are approaching the beginning of 2017. This is the time when many of us make our New Year’s Resolutions.  Do you make a resolution or two each year? How successful are you at fulfilling your resolutions?

I recently saw a definition of a New Year’s Resolution as a “to do list” for the first week in January!

For many people, unfortunately, this joke is their reality. Research shows that only 8% of those who make New Year’s Resolutions are successful in achieving what they have resolved. Some say that the reason our resolutions don’t work is that they are sometimes based on wishful thinking. Who doesn’t want to be happier, thinner, fit, more financially secure, etc.!  If only we could wave a magic wand and make it happen. Since that’s not possible, how can we help to ensure that the changes we want to see for ourselves are carried out?

The best advice for making positive changes in our lives is to be ready for the challenge.  There are  two basic strategies that can help you be successful:

1st Set realistic goals

  • Choose one or two achievable goals.
  • Don’t be overly aggressive with behavior change – take it slow!
  • Write them down. If you can see them each day, it may give you the motivation you need.

2nd Create an environment that will help you to succeed.

  • If you want to lose weight or become more fit, find an activity that you enjoy.
  • Ask others to help. A walking buddy can help you commit to that daily walk.
  • Enjoy a piece of fruit (or vegetable) every afternoon as a snack. This behavior helps you increase your fruit and veggie intake which may lead to behavior changes that encourage weight loss.
  • Don’t buy junk food – fill your refrigerator and pantry with healthy food and snacks.
  • If saving money is your goal, be sure you know the difference between your “wants” and “needs”.
  • Increase your money management skills by taking a class on budgeting or finance.

As you are making these new habits a part of your life, it would be good to avoid places, people, and situations that you know encourage your old habits. Stay away from people who try to sabotage your plans for a healthier life. Start with a small change and once it becomes a habit, explore the next step that you can take to achieve your overall goal.

Set some milestone markers and reward yourself when you reach them. That first marker might be walking at least 3 days per week when your goal is 5 days.  Buy yourself something fun – maybe a new pair of funky socks.

Maybe most importantly, don’t expect perfection!  Remember, you want this to be a new-years-resolutionlifelong change. There will be times that you will slip back into old habits but don’t use that as an excuse to give up on your goals. Recognize your mistake, refocus and move forward.

Author:  Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Franklin County

Reviewed by: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Pickaway County

References:

http://moneysmarts.iu.edu/tips/basics/new-years-resolution.shtml

http://www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statisticshttp://extension.usu.edu/htm/news-multimedia/articleID=4157

http://extension.psu.edu/health/news/2016/be-successful-in-keeping-new-year2019s-resolutions

http://uwyoextension.org/uwnutrition/2013/01/31/new-years-resolution-solutions/

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/the_three_most_important_tactics_for_keeping_your_resolutions

 

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