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Archive for the ‘Healthy People’ Category

We are at a point in our life where all our children are adults and moving out on their own. As they leave my home, one hope is that they appreciated the importance of family meals. Family meals go beyond the food that is prepared and consumed.  A great fact sheet from University of Flopink reciperida Extension used the letters in the word RECIPE to breakdown the importance of effective communication that family meals can provide.  Communicating with everyone in the family about healthy eating and the importance of physical activity is a great idea!  As attention increases over childhood weight issues and obesity, these discussions gain more significance.

The article breaks down each letter in the word RECIPE.  Each letter and an accompanying description follow:

– Reflective Listening

E – Encouragementrecipe

– Compromise and Cooperation

– “I”-messages

P – Practice

E – Engagement

The “R” is for Reflective listening, the vital skill of actively listening to those who are speaking.  Someone who is actively listening may ask questions, restate what was said, and understand or put themselves in other person’s shoes.  To a child’s statement of “I don’t want to eat that” a reflective listener might respond with a statement such as, “Sometimes it is hard to try new things”.

Encouragement, “E”, is appreciating what another has to say.  These responses may praise one another and offer supportive.  Encouragement helps keep the lines of communication open.

“C” doubly represents Compromise and Cooperation which allow family members to find solutions to conflict and disagreements.  When parents role model and encourage, “compromise and cooperation” conversations will likely lead to solutions that can be agreed upon by all.

“I” Messages are a s
pecific way of telling others how one feels.  An “I” message communicates to another how his or her behavior causes you to think or feel.  An example of an “I” message would be “I feel badly when I cook a big meal and no one is home to eat it” as opposed to a “You” statement such as “I don’t like what you have made for dinner.  I’ll make something myself.”

Practice is for “P” the fifth letter in the RECIPE communication acronym.  Practice is needed for any new skill to become a habit.  Practice requires patience and effort.

The “E” in RECIPE stands for Engagement.  This is defined as the level of involvement of each family member in the communication process.  This requires giving others your full attention.

Once all the letters of the RECIPE communication technique are blended together effective communication can start to take place.  This requires time and patience but can lead to better health and wellness for everyone in the family.

Author: Liz Smith, M.S., RDN, L.D. Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences.

Reviewed by:  Cheryl Barber Spires, RD, LD, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences.

Source: Family Nutrition: A RECIPE for Good Communication.  Retrieved from: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1060.

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Is your garden overflowing with zucchini or another type of summer squash? Lucky you!  Summer squash is a warm season vegetable that can be grown throughout the frost-free months.  Varieties of summer squash can be found in grocery stores year round, but they are most plentiful during June, July, and August.  Summer squash is harvested while the vegetable is still immature.  As a result, the skin of the squash is tender and is edible, unlike its fall and winter counterparts.

zucchini-1637435_640

 

What are the health benefits?

  • Summer squash is low in calories with only 16 calories per cup of raw squash. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables is high in fiber and low in calories which can help you maintain a healthy weight.
  • Summer squash is free of sodium and cholesterol. A diet low in sodium and cholesterol decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Summer squash is high in vitamins A and C. Vitamin A is important for healthy skin, vision, cell growth, and fighting infections. Vitamin C helps to fight infections, build new body tissue, heal wounds, and eliminate cancer causing substances.
  • Summer squash also contains potassium, manganese, folate, riboflavin, and vitamin B6. These help the body turn food into fuel as well as ensure proper contraction of the heart and skeletal muscles.

How do I select a summer squash at the grocery store?

  • Choose summer squash that has a firm, glossy/shiny skin that is free of cuts, bruises, and blemishes.
  • The summer squash should be heavy for its size. If comparing two of the same size, buy the heavier squash.
  • Choose small to medium varieties. Smaller squash is more flavorful than larger ones.

How do I store summer squash?

  • Store summer squash unwashed in plastic bags in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. Any water on the squash will promote decay while in storage.
  • Summer squash can be stored for up to a week in the refrigerator.

How should I prepare summer squash?

  • Summer squash should be washed well right before it is used in a meal.
  • Cut off both ends of the summer squash, but do not peel off the skin. Most of the vitamins and minerals are found near the skin. The skin of summer squash is very tender and easily eaten.
  • Summer squash can be enjoyed either raw or cooked.
  • Slice the squash and sauté, grill, steam, boil, roast, or microwave.

Top 5 ways to enjoy summer squash:

  1. Grate zucchini using a cheese grater and use it to make delicious zucchini bread or zucchini muffins.
  2. Chopped, raw summer squash can be added to a salad of lettuce, spinach, tomatoes, cucumber, onion, and chickpeas to make a colorful, refreshing dish on a hot summer day.
  3. Use squash as part of a summer chili.
  4. Use summer squash to make a delicious veggie lasagna.
  5. Use summer squash to make vegetable kabobs on a summer night. Toss summer squash, red bell peppers, and onions in olive oil, add salt and pepper, place on a skewer, and grill to perfection.

Sources:

https://extension.illinois.edu/veggies/ssquash.cfm

https://www.whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/factsheets/HHFS_SUMMERSQUASH_900151Dec2012.pdf

http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/summer-squash-nutrition-selection-storage

Author: Jennifer Even, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences/EFNEP Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Hamilton County.

Reviewer:  Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences/EFNEP Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County.

 

 

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centennial-logo-smith-leverWhen I started my “second career” as an Extension Educator I knew there were things I “knew” and things I did not “know” regarding Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS).  One learns that with age comes the reality that you don’t know everything nor do you need to – that’s why we have experts in their fields.  As a FCS Educator I knew there was one area that I lacked knowledge in but was to be a good part of the position in my county – Food Preservation.  Okay, growing up my mother was known to can food from time to time but I really do not recall much about it.  So when I was preparing to interview for the position I asked my mother if she could share with me what she knew about canning.  Her response “What kind of job teaches canning?”  Thank you mom!

Well, Extension and the position of a FCS Educator do teach about food preservation.  I was worried that people would call with food preservation questions and I could not provide them with a timely answer (let’s face it – people often call when they are in the middle of canning).  Or worse – look incompetent!

 So I, along with fellow FCS Educators who knew little about pressure and water bath canning (and uncertain whether or not we wanted to learn), set about increasing my canning knowledge.  At times I read science-based information and recipes, went to pressure and water bath canning in-services taught by OSU Extension Food Preservation Team, I asked questions, and did some practicing.  When I had food presnew-educator-canning-class-2016ervation classes I would bring along an OSU Extension Food Preservation “guru” when possible (after all my county deserves the best).  But what actually happened is that people from my county and surrounding counties contacted me again and again and again and I became immersed in food preservation.  Much of the time I told them I needed to consult the “Food Preservation Gurus” and get back with them.  Then, guess what?  I learned more and more, year after year.

Three years later I feel confident and capable to share the knowledge I have gained in food preservation with consumers who call needing information.  In fact, I now look forward to these food preservation questions.  With each call I no longer tremble and hide under my desk but instead say “bring it on” and “I can assist you!”

As humans we are lifelong learners which in part make our lives meaningful.  New brain cells can grow even in late adulthood and exercising your brain with new challenges will help to keep it healthy.  This can be done through a traditional academic course, by learning a new skill or improving on current ones.  If you would like to learn in a non-formal setting connect with Cooperative Extension.   There is an Extension office in every county in the United States that provides university-based research and learning opportunities to the peopleSo not only do I enjoy a position in which I get to share knowledge with people, families, and communities through Extension…I get to learn along with everyone else.  So check back with me in a few years because you might find I have been invited to join the OSU Extension Food Preservation Team as a “guru.”

 

WRITTEN BY: Candace J. Heer, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Morrow County, heer.7@osu.edu

REVIEWED BY:  Kate Shumaker, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Holmes County, shumaker.68@osu.edu

Sources:

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/featured/learn-something-new-every-day.html

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/learning-new-skill-can-slow-cognitive-aging-201604279502

https://livesmartohio.osu.edu/food/extensionauthors/celebrating-a-century-of-lifelong-learning-for-families-consumers/

https://nifa.usda.gov/partners-and-extension-map?state=All&type=All&order=field_filter&sort=desc

https://nifa.usda.gov/extension

Photo Sources:

http://www.extension100years.net/

OSU Extension New Educator Canning Class – 2016

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Back to school means back to packing school lunches. Children need a healthy lunch with the right calories and nutrients to help them learn, grow, and play. Not only do we want to pack our kids a healthy lunch, we want them to eat it, too! Sometimes we need some new ideas to keep lunch interesting. Here are some tips for packing a school lunch:

Plan ahead. Just a little planning time to get the right foods on the grocery list, in the cart, and in the fridge is the right place to start.

Plan together. Sit down with your child weekly to talk about lunch menu options. Allow your child to help plan the menu. He will be more excited about lunch and more likely to eat it.

Try something new. We all tend to get tired of the same foods every day. Change up the menu. Look up some new ideas together.

Try a different shape. Food that looks fun is more fun to eat. Try cutting a sandwich in a different direction or use cookie cutters. Sliced cheese and fruit (especially melon) will also cut nicely with cookie cutters.

lunchBuild in some color. Research shows the more colorful the food, the more appetizing it is. One of the easiest and healthiest ways to do this is with fresh vegetables and fruits. See if you can ‘pack a rainbow’ of color in your child’s lunch throughout the week.

Use MyPlate for your Lunch Bag! This fact sheet from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach gives a variety of ideas from every food group! Aim for at least 4 out of the 5 food groups for health and variety.

Rethink the drink. Water and low-fat milk are the best options for lunch. Sugary drinks are considered ‘empty calories.’ Calories but no nutrients.

Invest in “cool” lunch packs. Ice packs, insulated thermoses and insulated lunch bags allow for more varied menu options by keeping food at the right temperature.

Pack the night before. If you’re pressed for time, mornings can run more smoothly when there is less to do. Pack lunches in the evening right after dinner clean up. Or you could even try prepping lunches for the week on Sunday and refrigerate or freeze for later use.

For more ideas on packing a healthy and safe lunch, check out What’s for Lunch? It’s in the Bag!

Sources:

Iowa State University Extension

https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/13900

https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/13919

Written by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County

Reviewed by: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County

 

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DebbieMy family had a scare this week. My sister recently had breast reconstruction surgery from breast cancer. After the surgery she was instructed to wear a compression bra for 3 weeks, only taking it off to shower. It was uncomfortable and perhaps a little tight. She thought the bra and surgical site were causing her discomfort. She didn’t think it was a heart attack. She said the pain was strong but thought it was related to her recent surgery. When she called the surgeon’s office, they asked if someone could take her to the ER, she said yes and then drove herself to the ER.

Many women have symptoms of a heart attack and/or a stroke and don’t recognize them. Don’t be one of the statistics that misinterpret your symptoms. According to the American Heart Association, the symptoms a woman experiences may be very different from the ones that a man experiences.

Heart Attack Signs in Women

  1. Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of your chest. It lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and comes back.
  2. Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  3. Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  4. Other signs such as breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or light headedness.
  5. As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain.

If you have any of these signs, call 9-1-1 and get to a hospital right away.

What is the take-a-way from my sister’s experience? If you have symptoms, don’t hesitate to seek medical help. Go to the nearest ER room and get checked out. My sister isn’t the only one to miss symptoms, read this blog posted on the American Heart Association about a 38 year old woman who had a stroke and didn’t know it! Don’t become a statistic because you are afraid to inconvenience your family or doctor.

Source: American Heart Association, http://www.heart.org

Photo credit: Nancy Harris

Author: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

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The next time you are looking for health and wellness information, check out the recorded webinars on our Live Healthy Live Well Blog site. Webinars last 25 to 30 minutes and cover a variety or topics on healthy relationships, healthy finances, and healthy people. You can watch the webinar or listen to the recording to gather information on topics like Local Foods, Holiday Stress, Supermarket Starts, Sun Safety, and much more. New webinars will be added frequently, so check back soon!

http://go.osu.edu/LHLWwebinars tablet-690032_1280

 

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sweet corna

 

One of summer’s greatest pleasures is enjoying a fresh ear of sweet corn at a backyard barbecue.   We eagerly await the corn harvest, and now it’s here!  Fresh sweet corn is available in most communities throughout the month of August.

Corn is a nutrient-rich vegetable.  One ear of corn is a good source of fiber, vitamin C, folate, magnesium, and potassium.  Corn is also a good source of lutein and zeaxanthin; phyto-nutrients that are linked to a reduced risk for cataracts and macular degeneration.  Corn has about the same amount of calories as an apple, but with one-fourth less sugar.

To reap the full nutritional benefits of corn, cook no longer than 10 minutes in boiling water to minimize nutrient loss. While boiling is the primary way most of us prepare corn, grilling is a popular and tasty alternative. Other ways to enjoy this nutritious vegetable include mixing it into pasta dishes, corn bread, soups and/or salads.

For a different taste, try seasoning corn with lime juice instead of butter.  Or combine cooked corn kernels with chopped scallions, red pepper, hot pepper sauce and lime juice as a quick salsa for meat, poultry or fish.

So what are you waiting for?  In a few weeks corn season will be over. Make plans to visit your local farmer’s market to pick up some sweet corn this weekend!

Written by:  Beth Stefura M Ed, RD, LD, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Donna Green, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu
Resources:  Summer Corn – More Than Delicious, Web MD

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