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This is a perfect time of year to teach our children aboutHappy Thanksgiving word cloud being thankful.  The Thanksgiving holiday has many opportunities to create new family traditions that will bring the real meaning of thankfulness and gratitude to a personal level for our children.  Even is the mist of extremely challenging circumstances, we can find something to be thankful for.  In addition to helping us cope with challenges, this kind of grateful attitude can be contagious and is a wonderful life lesson to share with our children.  Learning to be truly grateful can change your life. The Greater Good Science Center at University of California-Berkeley notes three key reasons to teach children to be grateful.

  • Grateful kids are more kind
  • Grateful teens are happier and get better grades
  • Grateful kids become stewards of the environment

Teaching children to be thankful helps them resist their natural urge to be self-centered and self-absorbed.  Thankfulness is an important character trait that allows young people to develop meaningful relationships with others, and is directly related to happiness.  Understanding the good things in our lives will go a long way during adversity.

Kids are never too young to start learning how to show thanks for the good things in their lives.  Although Thanksgiving, by its name alone, makes us think about giving thanks, we should teach our children by example, that being thankful and telling others how much they are appreciated should happen every day. Parents and caregivers are the main ingredient in teaching young children no matter how young or old about being grateful.  We teach with our actions more than words.  So, it will take some thoughtful planning to find time around our busy work schedules but many things can be incorporated in our day-to-day lives with very little effort.

Here are some ideas to try with your family:

A Thanksgiving Tree:  Get each child to trace their hand on a piece of paper.  Have each child write various things they are thankful for on the fingers.

The Thankful Paper Chain:  Cut strips of paper.  On each strip have the child write about something they are thankful for, such as “Grandma plays games with me” or “I have a nice teacher.”  Connect them into loops.  It would be fun to add to the chain as other holidays approach.

Giving Thanks Placemats:  The goal of this craft is to create a collage filled with pictures of all the things your children are grateful for.  Using magazine pictures or pictures from the computer, glue them on a placemat size piece of paper.  Older children could write captions.  You can even laminate it to use again and again.

A Thank You Note Project:  Teach your children to write thank you notes for presents they receive or kindnesses that are shown to them.

Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life.  It turns what we have into enough, and more.  It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity.  It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend.  Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today and creates a vision for tomorrow.

Resource:

Rothenberg, W. A., Hussong, A. M., Langley, H. A., Egerton, G. A., Halberstadt, A. G., Coffman, J. L., Mokrova, I., & Costanzo, P. R., Grateful parents raising grateful children: Niche selection and the socialization of child gratitude, Applied Developmental Science Vol. 21, Iss. 2, 2017

Written by: Kathy Green, Family & Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, green.1405@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Janet Wasko Myers, Program Assistant, Horticulture, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, myers.31@osu.edu

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Holiday meals are a wonderful way to re-connect with family and friends. We tend to spend more money and time preparing special holiday foods. USDA offers some tips on preparing a healthy, low-cost holiday meal:

Plan ahead. Deciding early on your menu can save both time and money. You can look for sales and coupons to help lower food costs. Check your cupboards and use what you have along with items you need to purchase. For more help in planning your meal, check out USDA’s Countdown to Thanksgiving.

Use canned and frozen produce. Because these foods can be stored longer, you can purchase them when they are on sale.

thanksgiving.jpgConsider frozen meat. Meat tends to be the most expensive part of the meal. In general, frozen meats tend to cost less. Make sure you have space in your freezer to store and your refrigerator later for thawing before cooking and also for storing leftovers.

Have a potluck. Invite family members to bring a dish with them. You can coordinate these dishes with your menu so there is a nice variety. This can save you both time and money.

Healthy and homemade. While store-bought dishes or desserts can save you time, they can be expensive. Making them yourself can help save money and you can adjust the amount of salt, sugar and fat as your prepare the food.

Try a new recipe. USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service offers a variety of healthy, low-cost recipes. You can also read more on the MyPlate Holiday Makeover.

Use your leftovers. You want to make sure all leftovers are stored safely so they can become part of a tasty dish. Freeze what you cannot use within 7 days.

Our Live Healthy Live Well team wishes you and yours a happy and healthy Thanksgiving.

Sources:

Rowe, A. (2013). Stretching a Holiday Food Budget during the Busy Holiday Season. United States Department of Agriculture. https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2013/12/3/stretching-holiday-food-budget-during-busy-holiday-season

Countdown to the Thanksgiving Holiday. (2013) United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service. https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/seasonal-food-safety/countdown-to-the-thanksgiving-holiday/CT_Index

Written by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County.

Reviewed by:  Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County.

 

 

 

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When your pet ingests a toxin, time can be of the essence. Immediately contacting the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 24-hour hotline (1-888-426-4435) will give you and your veterinarianpetsan potentially life-saving information regarding the treatment of your loved one.

 

 

To protect your pet, we recommend that you follow these simple guidelines:

  • Always follow instructions on the label of prescription medications.
  • Never give your pet any of your prescription or over-the-counter                            medications unless explicitly instructed to do so by a veterinarian.
  • Keep common household cleaning products safely stored away from pet access.
  • Prevent access to the garbage by keeping a tight lid on all cans or store out of reach of your pets.
  • Only have your home treated with chemicals that are nontoxic to pets.
  • Seek emergency care if your pet has ingested a toxin.

During the holidays, there are other things that should be of special concern to our pets, Here are some of the things that might be “eye-catching” to your pet during the holiday season?

  • Alcohol (including eggnog & punch)Bones (chicken & turkey)
  • Car enginesoutdoor cats seek warmth
  • Christmas treescats climb and like ornaments & tinsel, strands of lights,      stagnant or fertilized tree water, pine needles
  • Chocolate
  • Confetti
  • Electrical cords & wires
  • Grapes & raisins
  • Lighted candles
  • Outdoor hazardsantifreeze, frostbite, frozen water bowl (outdoors), rock salt, sub-zero temperatures
  • PlantsChristmas cactus, lilies, holly
  • Ribbons, bows & giftwrap
  • Rich foods
  • Sugar-free desserts/gum (with Xylitol)
  • Trash cans with discarded/moldy foods

Remember to always work in partnership with your family veterinarian.

Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions; they pass no criticisms.  –George Eliot

 Adapted by:  Janet Wasko Myers, Program Assistant, Horticulture, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, myers.31@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, green.1405@osu.edu

Sources:

Information is provided by The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center.  Contact The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center at:  http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/  (614) 292-3551, 24/7 Operating Center.

The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine at:  http://vet.osu.edu

Protect your Pet from Household Hazards at:  http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/owner-education/protect-your-pet-household-hazards

General Safety info pdf and HolidaySafetyHazards.pdf at the bottom of the page at:  http://vet.osu.edu/vmc/companion/owner-education/protect-your-pet-household-hazards

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Do you have a regular exercise routine? If so, maybe you feel like you are in an exercise rut- you’re tired of doing the same thing over and over but you don’t know how to mix it up. Or, maybe you have found a form of exercise that you really enjoy, so you feel compelled to keep doing what you have been. While finding an activity you view as fun rather than work is central to sticking with and benefiting from an exercise program, it’s still important to mix up your exercise routine. When we continuously repeat the same activities, our muscles become accustomed to the movement and fail to be challenged.

Personally, I have spent the past year attending hip hop fitness classes. While I very much enjoy these classes, I know my body would benefit from other types of movement. Maybe that means trying out another fitness class, like kickboxing or cycling, taking a morning walk or jog, or adding pilates or weight training to my fitness routine.

To reap the biggest benefit from your exercise program, experts suggest you include at least three different types of activity in your workout routine. See the infographic below to learn more about the different types of exercise.

Types of Exercise

To create a well-balanced exercise routine, aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity in at least 10-minute increments throughout the week. Add 2-3 sessions of strength training per week, with each session containing 1-3 sets of 6-10 exercises, each set containing 10-12 repetitions of each exercise.  (Repetitions are the number of times you perform a specific exercise without stopping. A set is a group of repetitions). Perform stretches 2-3 times per week, perhaps after your cardio or strength workout. Hold each stretch for 10-30 seconds. You may wish to do multiple repetitions of each stretch.

As you get comfortable in a routine and feel the need to mix things up to challenge yourself, consider increasing the frequency, duration or intensity of your workouts. For strength training exercises, this may mean increasing the number of reps or sets you complete, or the amount weight you use to complete your sets.

How will you mix up your workout routine? Let us know by leaving a comment in the box below!

 

Author: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

 

Sources:

Harvard Health Letter (2017). The 4 most important types of exercise. https://www.health.harvard.edu/exercise-and-fitness/the-4-most-important-types-of-exercise

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (2011). What Does a Well Rounded Fitness Program Include? https://healthandwellness.vanderbilt.edu/news/2011/09/what-does-a-well-rounded-fitness-program-include/

Werle, C., Wansink, B. & Payne, C. (2014). Is it fun or exercise? The framing of physical activity biases subsequent snacking. Cornell University Food and Brand Lab. https://foodpsychology.cornell.edu/research/it-fun-or-exercise-framing-physical-activity-biases-subsequent-snacking.

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apple-cider-337x335I bought my first gallon of apple cider in mid-September and will continue to do so for a couple more months. No other beverage conjures up as many happy childhood memories of fall as drinking cider. I’m not an apple juice drinker, but I do love my cider!

As a rule, I tend not to drink much juice because of the sugar content. I prefer to eat whole fruits and/or veggies to get the maximum amount of health benefits. But it isn’t always easy to get the recommended number of plant foods in my daily diet. One four-ounce serving of apple cider counts as a serving of fruit.

Apple cider is usually made from a blend of different types of apples to give it a nice balance between sweet and tart. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, apples are first ground into pulp and then pressed to extract the juice. The juice quickly oxidizes, giving the cider its deep amber color. Apple cider is made in the cooler months because hot weather hastens fermentation.

Apple cider is not clarified like apple juice, so it still contains its starches and pectins. They are the ingredients that give cider its dark, cloudy color.

Below are some of the health benefits found in apple cider:

Antioxidants

You probably eat a variety of foods to protect your organs, bones, and muscles. Plant foods contain antioxidants, which help protect your cells. Antioxidants prevent or stop cell damage caused by oxidants (because they are “anti” oxidation). Oxidants are free radicals found in the environment as well as produced in your body.

Flavonoids

Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants with anti-inflammatory and immune system benefits. Diets high in flavonoid-containing foods, like apples, may lower your risk for cancer, neurodegenerative disease, cardiovascular disease, and Type 2 diabetes.

Constipation/Fiber

If you’ve been a frequent cider drinker over the years, you probably remember that cider helps with “regularity.” The small amount of fiber in cider, in combination with the sugar alcohol sorbitol, helps promote regular bowel movements and looser stools.

Pectin

Apples are an excellent source of pectin, and fortunately cider contains just as much as the whole fruit. Pectin helps absorb bad cholesterol in the body.

Where to buy?

Apple cider is found in grocery stores, farm markets, local farms that sell fruit and/or cider from their own orchards and cider mills, as well as some convenience and drug stores. Cider purchased in retail establishments will most likely be pasteurized, whereas you may potentially purchase unpasteurized cider from farms or farm markets. There is a difference in taste between the two types. If you purchase unpasteurized cider, look for the Label Warning Statement**.

WARNING: This product has not been pasteurized and, therefore, may contain harmful bacteria that can cause serious illness in children, the elderly, and persons with weakened immune systems.”

**A warning statement for untreated cider and/or juice products must appear on the label.

 

Written by:  Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

 

Reviewed by:  Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

 

Sources:

http://www.aicr.org/press/health-features/health-talk/2014/dec14/serving-size-juice.html

https://www.farmersalmanac.com/food/2008/09/29/apple-cider-season/

http://www.agri.ohio.gov/FoodSafety/docs/hcomm/food-apple_cider_fs.pdf

 

 

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We have all heard of the superbugs which researchers warn us about.  Superbugs doPill bottlesn’t respond to the antibiotics we often use to treat infections.  They have become resistant to the antibiotics we have available.  The problem is due to the overuse of antibiotics making them less effective in fighting bacteria.

We are being warned to ask doctors not to prescribe antibiotics for some infections.  Since most of us trust our doctors and don’t question what they say, we need to educate ourselves on what conditions may not need an antibiotic.  We also need to know how we should respond when we do have certain infections.

Consumer Reports has provided some information about infections we should question our doctors about before taking antibiotics.  They feel most of these infections (listed below) do not respond to antibiotic treatment.  Antibiotics treat bacterial infections and are not effective against viral infections (caused by viruses).  When most of us go to the doctor we want a pill (quick fix) to take care of whatever we have, so doctors have gotten used to prescribing antibiotics just in case there is a bacterial infection with the virus.  Most of us would get better without any antibiotics, but we credit the pill for making us better.

If you experience these conditions ask your doctor if they think antibiotics will really help:

Table for Pat's blog

To reduce your risk of antibiotic resistance check with your doctor to make sure antibiotics are necessary.  Use antibiotics only as prescribed by your doctor and IMG-Wash-Hand-Sticker-Remindertake as the prescription recommends.  To keep germs away practice good personal hygiene by washing your hands with soap and water, especially after using the restroom, before eating, and while preparing food.  Make sure you and your children receive all the recommended vaccinations.  Eating healthy and being active are also keys to staying healthy.

 

Author:  Pat Brinkman, Ohio State University Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Ohio State University Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educator

 

References:

Consumer Reports. (2016). When to Say No to Antibiotics for Infection.  Available at https://www.consumerreports.org/drugs/when-to-say-no-to-antibiotics-for-infection/

Mayo Clinic, (2014).  Consumer Health.  Mayo Clinic. Available at https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/antibiotics/art-20045720

Skinner, G. (2010).  Just Say No to Antibiotics for the Cold and Flu.  Consumer Reports.    Available at https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2010/11/just-say-no-to-antibiotics-for-the-cold-and-flu/index.htm

Goff, D. (2017). Battling Superbugs. The Ohio State University.  Available at https://www.osu.edu/features/2017/battling-superbugs.html?utm_campaign=UNIV%20March%20Connect%20with%20MyOhioState&utm_medium=email&utm_source=EOACLK

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October is Cranberry Month! Cranberries were one of those fruits that my family did not eat very often. Several years ago my step-dad was reading a mystery book and found a recipe for “Killer Cranberry Scones”  – the main character in the book was known for these. When he found the recipe in the back of the book he asked me to make them for him. Everyone loved them, and ever since I have tried many recipes using cranberries.

Now is the time of year when cranberries are in season. If you purchase some and do not have the time to use them, you can freeze them. This is a great way to have cranberries all year long.

According to the Cranberry Institute: 1 cup of raw cranberries has about 50 calories. Cranberries are also associated with these health benefits:

  • Urinary tract health – may reduce the risk of UTI’s, a painful condition that afflicts some 11 million American women each year.
  • Heart health – try cranberries in salads, trail mixes, or smoothies. They are the perfect addition to a heart-healthy diet.
  • Ulcers – cranberries may prevent adhesion of the bacteria H. pylori to the lining of the stomach.
  • Whole body benefits – cranberries provide a myriad of health benefits.  All commonly enjoyed cranberry products contain beneficial antioxidants.

According to the American Cancer Society, eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk for cancer and developing other chronic diseases.

Looking for a new recipe to try? Check out these recipes from USDA’s Recipe Finder, What’s Cooking?

Perfect for fall is the Apple Cranberry Salad Toss. Doesn’t it look yummy?

Cranberry Nut Bread makes a perfect option for breakfast, lunch or snack. Add fresh cranberries to your favorite muffins or bread recipe.

Another source for easy-to-follow cranberry recipes, can be found at USCranberries.com.

For more information on cranberries, visit The Cranberry Institute.

Do you have a favorite cranberry recipe? If so, share it in our comments.

Sources:

The Top 10 Reasons to Recommend Cranberries

https://www.cranberryinstitute.org/HCP/New%20Top%2010%20Reasons%20to%20Recommend%20CranberriesF.pdf

Rediscover Cranberries!

https://www.cranberryinstitute.org/HCP/1_REDISCOVER.pdf

Writer: Brenda Sandman-Stover, Extension Program Assistant, 4-H and Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Greene County.

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County.

 

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