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Sometimes you need to find ways to sneak activity into your daily life! Below are some tips that might just help you be successful.
Get everyone on board—sometimes it is tough to get the kids to change their lifestyle, but the example Mom and Dad set can go a long way toward adjusting the mindset of the other family members. Any process is easier when you have a support system.
Sometimes the basics are the best, focus on those traditional moves that use your own body weight. Exercises like squats and pushups can often work just as well as expensive machines or workouts.
Make errands counts—park far from your destination so that you and the kids have to walk. Take the stairs rather than the elevator as often as you can.
Do what you love—find activities that your whole family enjoys. Maybe dodge ball or kickball, hiking or bike rides. If everyone likes the activity it is easier to fit it into your schedule.
Modeling behavior—when Mom or Dad has objectives or goals that they set out to achieve the kids will learn from this. It will teach and motivate them to want to do the same.
Make a smart trade or swap—three or four times a week swap an after dinner family walk in place of that dessert.
Set goals—everyone needs a measuring stick for progress. By setting goals the family can be focused on the mission at hand.
Switch things up—hitting a plateau can happen during your fitness mission. Try FITT (frequency, intensity, type or time of routine) – change one of the 4 areas of fitness for an improved you! Your body adjusts to the fitness you have chosen. By changing it up some you can often get beyond the plateau and start seeing progress again.
I hope some of these help as you start on your fall fitness course. Remember it takes about 21 days to break or form a habit, so start one of these healthy habits today!
Author: Liz Smith, Family and Consumer Science Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension.
Reviewed by: Lisa Barlage, Family & Consumer Sciences Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension.
Source: nih.gov/health/public/health/obesity/wecan/get-active

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