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Posts Tagged ‘American Heart Month’

As a Registered Dietitian, I love when February rolls around! I break out my wardrobe of red and heart themes to raise awareness of heart disease and best practices to take care of your heart in honor of American Heart Month

In January of this year, we learned of a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health revealing people who consume higher amounts of olive oil may lower their risk of premature death overall from specific causes including cardiovascular disease.  According to this study, swapping out the butter or other artery-clogging fats in your diet may add years to your life. 

This study revealed that individuals consuming more than a ½ tablespoon of olive oil daily are less likely to die from heart disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s or lung disease when compared to people who consume less of this healthy fat.

Researchers encourage individuals to pay attention to their overall diet quality and lifestyle. A key factor is to add olive oil into the diet as a substitution for other, unhealthier fats. Olive oil is rich in healthy antioxidants, polyphenols, and vitamins and is a good source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.

After this study was revealed, a great discussion was held with my colleagues.  We were encouraged by the results of this new information and began examining how to add more olive oil into our diets.

We determined that replacing a fat is different from adding one to your diet, and one of the easiest ways to replace butter and other animal fats is with olive oil. To make an easy transition and introduce olive oil into our diets, if a recipe contains butter, cut out half the butter and replace it with olive oil. Introducing more olive oil into our diets can also be accomplished with using infused olive oil to flavor whole grains, vegetables, and proteins, or by  dipping bread into olive oil bread dip. This easy and healthy dip is made by combining high quality extra virgin olive oil (richer in flavor and intended for dipping) with spices such as garlic powder, oregano, rosemary, basil, or crushed red pepper flakes. Use a crusty bread or Artisan loaf for dipping.

Living heart-healthy involves understanding your risk, making choices, and taking steps to reduce your chances of getting heart disease. By taking these preventive measures, you can lower your risk of developing heart disease and improve your overall health and well-being.

Written by:       Beth Stefura, RD,LD, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Mahoning County,                The Ohio State University, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:     Jenny Lobb, RD,LD, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Franklin County, The Ohio State University, lobb.3@osu.edu

References

American College of Cardiology (2022). Higher olive oil intake associated with lower risk of CVD mortality. Science Daily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/01/220110145249.htm

American Heart Association (2021). Saturated Fat. https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/fats/saturated-fats

Gordon, B. (2021). Choose Healthy Fats. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/choose-healthy-fats

Palmer, S. (2011). Olive Oil California Style! This Golden-Green Liquid Is Fragrant, Flavorful, and Bursting With Heart Health Benefits. Today’s Dietitian. https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/100111p30.shtml

Webb, D. (2013). Phytochemicals’ Role in Good Health. Today’s Dietitian. https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/090313p70.shtml.

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two hands with mittens holding a heart-shaped snowball
What comes to mind when you think of February? For many, it’s Valentine’s Day, others may think of a dreaded month of winter weather. Some may know February as Black History Month. Still others, like me, may think of American Heart Month. While all of these are accurate, one is nearer and dearer to my heart, pun intended.

You see, at the end of my junior year of high school, my dad had his first heart-related incident two days after his 37th birthday. He had to have angioplasty for a blocked artery. A month or so later, my dad’s brother John had to have open-heart surgery ON his birthday. My dad had already lost his oldest brother to a massive heart attack. Uncle Bill was in his forties when he collapsed after coming home from work. My dad’s brother Jim had suffered a heart attack and had a couple of heart procedure in subsequent years as well. My dad had another angioplasty when I was a freshman in college.

My dad attended cardiac rehabilitation after both of his angioplasties. The first time, I attended some of his sessions since I was out of school for the summer. While attending Ohio University, I learned about a program that would enable me to work in cardiac rehab. I never realized this was something I would be able to do without becoming a physician. I completed the program and was fortunate to find a position right away working for a cardiologist who had cardiac rehab as part of his practice. I worked there for 5 years before taking a position in a hospital cardiac and pulmonary rehab facility.

My dad had his first open-heart surgery shortly after he turned 44. Yes, you read that right. My dad’s oldest living brother Bob, had open heart surgery a couple months later the same year. My dad had his second open-heart surgery 2 days prior to his 57th birthday, which he celebrated in the hospital. A month or so prior to this, my uncle by marriage had to have a stent. He attended cardiac rehab at the hospital where I was working. When my dad had his second open-heart surgery, he started cardiac rehab 2 weeks after his surgery because he was recovering so well and my uncle was able to drive him. This was an interesting experience for me. The person who had always taken care of me, was now in my care. It was also a relief because I knew he was getting the best of care.

My dad will turn 67 at the end of May. I am happy to say that he is doing fairly well. He finally quit smoking once and for all. Yes, he quit each time he had a heart event, but he eventually started back. He takes his medications as directed. Stress is really not an issue for him. He could stand to be more active and eat a little better, both of which would help his weight. Overall, everything considered, he is fortunate. I am also happy to report that I turned 46 in August and I have no signs or symptoms of any heart-related conditions.

As you may have figured out, heart disease is very near and dear to me. I obviously learned at a young age that I have a strong family history. So, I have taken steps to try to help reduce my risk for developing heart disease. While we hear about all sorts of other diseases and conditions, heart disease has been and still remains the number one killer of men AND women in the United States. So, if you have not been taking the best care of your heart, it’s not too late to start. What better month than February to begin?!

10 Things You May Not Know About Heart Disease [Infographic]

Written by: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Photos:

https://www.nm.org/healthbeat/healthy-tips/heart-facts-infographic

https://pixabay.com/en/heart-snowball-gloves-winter-hands-1416344/

Sources:

American Heart Association, (2019). Found at: https://www.heart.org/

American Heart Association, (2019). Cardiovascular disease affects nearly half of American adults, statistics show. Found at: https://www.heart.org/en/news/2019/01/31/cardiovascular-diseases-affect-nearly-half-of-american-adults-statistics-show

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (2015). Preventing Heart Disease: Healthy Living Habits. Found at: https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/healthy_living.htm

CNN Staff, (2019).  Meet the man who created Black History Month. Retrieved from: https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/01/us/history-of-black-history-month-trnd/index.html

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, (2013). Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes. Retrieved from: https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/heart-healthy-lifestyle-changes

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. Learn more about heart disease. Retrieved from: https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/education-and-awareness/heart-month/learn-more-about-heart-disease

Office of Women’s Health, (2018). Retrieved from: https://www.womenshealth.gov/heart-disease-and-stroke

 

 

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