Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Blood Sugar’

A staggering 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes, millions of which are undiagnosed. Diabetes is a condition where blood sugar (glucose) levels are higher than recommended for good health.  Glucose is a type of sugar found in the foods we eat and is an important source of energy for the body.  Sources of glucose in the diet include: breads, cereals, rice, noodles, fruits, starchy vegetables, dried beans (examples navy and pinto), and milk.  Insulin allows the body to use glucose for energy. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes.  People with type 2 diabetes, the majority of who are adults, do not have adequate amounts of insulin or the insulin they do have does not work as effectively. This results in elevated blood sugar (glucose) levels and diabetes.

The impact diabetes has on our health and wallet is eye-opening.  Diabetes contributes to cardiovascular disease, cancer, dementia, kidney disease and blindness.  The estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2017 was in the hundreds of billions of dollars!

In addition to diabetes, prediabetes has become a major health concern in the United States.  Over 86 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but are not high enough to be classified as diabetes.  Prediabetes increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future.  Because prediabetes is often without symptoms, most people are unaware they have it.  Testing for prediabetes and diabetes identifies those with the disease and allows healthcare professionals to manage the disease sooner. Lifestyle changes, which include weight loss, may help to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.  If diagnosed with diabetes, early treatment can help prevent long-term complications of the disease.

picture of finger stick blood sugar test

Symptoms of diabetes include the following: increased urination, increased thirst, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, and sores that do not heal.  Anyone who has these symptoms should be tested for diabetes.  People without symptoms who are overweight or obese and have one or more of the additional risk factors, should be screened for prediabetes and diabetes.  These risk factors include: parent or sibling with diabetes, African American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, Pacific Islander ethnicity, history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, low HDL (less than 35mg/dl), elevated triglycerides (greater than 250 mg/dl), polycystic ovary syndrome, and physical inactivity.  Other forms of diabetes include type 1 diabetes and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually is found in children and young adults. Often these individuals have diabetes symptoms and significantly high levels of glucose in their blood when they are diagnosed.  Gestational diabetes, is diabetes newly diagnosed in women between their 24-28th week of pregnancy.

Testing for diabetes is done through blood tests in a variety of ways.  These blood tests include: fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, random plasma glucose and a hemoglobin A1C test.  Below find a description of the main types of tests used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes:

Fasting plasma glucose test– Blood glucose level is measured after not eating or drinking anything except small amounts of water for at least 8 hours.

Oral glucose tolerance test– Blood glucose level is measured every hour for 2 to 3 hours after drinking a glucose-containing beverage. First, you must have fasted (nothing to eat or drink except water) for 8 hours before drinking the glucose-containing beverage.

Random plasma glucose test– Blood glucose is measured at any time with no consideration to whether you have eaten or not. **Cannot be used to diagnose prediabetes.

Hemoglobin A1c test– This blood test gives you an average blood glucose level over the last 2-3 months.  This test is not accurate if you have anemia.

In order to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes it is normally verified with a second test on a different day.  A fasting blood glucose of 126 mg/dl or above on two different occasions, confirms diabetes.  A random plasma blood glucose of 200 or greater on more than one occasion is considered a positive test result for diabetes.  A hemoglobin A1C result of 6.5 % or above on more than one occasion is also symptomatic of diabetes.  Positive oral glucose tolerance test results differ between pregnant and non-pregnant populations. The main differences include the amount of glucose-containing beverage consumed, and the frequency of blood glucose measurements.  Generally, in non-pregnant women, a blood glucose value over 200mg/dl two hours after drinking a glucose-containing beverage (containing 75 grams of glucose) is indicative of diabetes.  In the pregnant population more glucose is given and blood glucose levels are measured multiple times.

Prediabetes is also diagnosed with blood testing.  Fasting plasma glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl indicate the presence of prediabetes.  An oral glucose tolerance test between 140-199 mg/dl two hours after drinking a glucose-containing beverage also indicates prediabetes.  More recently hemoglobin A1C has been used to diagnose prediabetes.  A hemoglobin A1C result of between 5.7% and 6.4 % is consistent with prediabetes.

Please find below two links that can help determine if you are at risk for diabetes or prediabetes.

Diabetes Risk Test:  http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/

Prediabetes Risk Test: https://doihaveprediabetes.org/prediabetes-risk-test.html

WITTEN BY: Joyce Riley, MS, RD, LD, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Union County

REVIEWED BY: Daniel Remley, Associate Professor, Field Specialist, Food and Nutrition and Wellness, OSU Extension

 

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care 2018; 41 (Supplement 1): S13-S27.  https://doiorg10/10.2337/dc 18-S002

American Diabetes Association (2018) Diabetes Risk Test.  http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/

American Diabetes Association (2017) Prediabetes Risk Test. https://doihaveprediabetes.org/prediabetes-risk-test.html

Mayo Clinic (2018) Diabetes. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/symptoms-causes/syc-20371444

MedlinePlus National Institutes of Health (2018) Diabetes. https://medlineplus.gov/diabetes.html

National Diabetes Education Program (2018) Guiding Principles for the Care of People with or at Risk for Diabetes.  https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/communication-programs/ndep/health-professionals/guiding-principles-care-people-risk-diabetes

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease (2016) Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis.   https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes

WebMD (2016) Diagnosis of Diabetes.  https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/diagnosis-diabetes#1

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

President Barack Obama has proclaimed November 2016 as National Diabetes Month. In his proclamation he states, “I call upon all Americans, school systems, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, health care providers, research institutions, and other interested groups to join in activities that raise diabetes awareness and help prevent, treat, and manage the disease.” Today’s blog is one effort to help in raise awareness and inform you about a free online educational opportunity to learn more about managing diabetes.

idf_infographics_en-2Additionally, November 14, 2016 is World Diabetes Day. It was created by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization in response to rising concerns about the increasing health risks of diabetes. This year’s theme is EYES ON DIABETES. Its focus is on the importance of screening to ensure early diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

One in two adults with diabetes is undiagnosed. Diabetes is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputations. Over one-third of all people currently living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes will develop some form of damage to their eyes that can lead to blindness. These complications can be prevented or delayed by maintaining proper blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels.  Screenings can detect complications in their early stages and treatment plans can prevent vision loss.

Healthy eating also is an important part of managing all types of diabetes. Do you want to learn more about healthy eating and diabetes?  A team of Ohio State University Extension educators and researchers have developed a self-paced online course to help participants learn, share and chat with health professionals about managing diabetes.The course, Dining with Diabetes: Beyond the Kitchen focuses on carbohydrates, fats, sodium, vitamins, minerals and fiber. The easy to follow three-module course includes lessons, videos and activities to complete.

Participants can expect to learn:

  • How important blood sugar and carbohydrates are for managing diabetes.
  • How fats and sodium affect a healthy diet.
  • The role vitamins, minerals and fiber play in a healthy diet.
  • How to make healthy food choices when eating out and grocery shopping.

After completion of the course, participants receive a printable certificate. They are also automatically entered in a quarterly drawing for a $100 Amazon.com gift card.

Sign up is easy and free. Visit go.osu.edu/DWD_BTK and click “buy now.” The course will be added to cart for checkout at no cost. After completing the transaction, participant will be required to create an account with campus.extension.org to take advantage of all the materials.

Written by: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County

Reviewed by: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension

Read Full Post »

3846351163_a4fd09c8da_mIt seems to be a trending topic, and one with real implications.  Now more than ever, we are realizing that when a person is hungry, he or she may have a lesser control on emotions and the actions that accompany the feelings.  #Hangry, and the meaning behind it, is popping up everywhere from candy bar commercials to memes on Instagram and Facebook.

A recent research study posted online at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences relays that spouses were more likely to show higher levels aggression towards their wife or husband at times when their blood sugar levels were low.  An interesting model, the anger was measured with pins in voo doo dolls and blasting noise into headphones in accordance with the amount of fury being felt.  Haven’t many of us imaginarily wished we had a voo doo doll once or twice in our lives?

Knowing that communication and the emotions that are involved lead to positive or very negative outcomes that affect many, with guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics here are 5 Tips for Preventing the Hangry Dilemma:

  1. Eat regularly scheduled light meals and snacks that include a variety of protein, fat and carbohydrate sources.
  2. Limit empty calorie foods that are mainly simple sugars, refined carbohydrates, and saturated or trans fats.
  3. Choose whole grains more often along with other high fiber foods like beans, vegetables, and nuts.
  4. Plan ahead by making a shopping list that you will stick to and a weekly menu that will lessen spur of the moment stops for fast-food.
  5. Maintain an active lifestyle replenishing your body with healthy foods such as fruits, yogurt, and low-fat granola and beverages such as water and milk.

Author:  Cheryl Barber Spires, R.D., L.D., Program Specialist, Ohio State University Extension, spires.53@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Jamie Seger, Program Director, Ohio State University Extension, seger.23@osu.edu

Sources:  Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/diseases-and-conditions/diabetes/diabetes-and-diet

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, http://www.pnas.org/content/111/17/6254.full

Read Full Post »