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Posts Tagged ‘brain health’

Daughter and Mother Living with Dementia

Do you ever forget where you’ve placed your remote, or just can’t recall the name of acquaintance? When this occurs, do you wonder if you are starting to develop dementia? It’s common to become somewhat more forgetful as you age. The question is, how you can tell whether your memory lapses are part of normal aging or are a symptom of something more serious.

If you are in your 40’s, 50’s or 60’s, you may have noticed that you might need a bit longer to remember things, get distracted more easily or struggle to multi-task as well as you once did. You may worry that these are an early sign of dementia, it is important not to worry too much. While these changes are frustrating at times, they are a part of normal aging.  

By contrast, people with dementia have a loss of memory and other mental function severe enough that it affects their ability to live independently at home, interact is social activities and at work. While some memory loss, such as recall and recognition, is the result of the aging brain, dementia is some type of injury to the brain that goes beyond normal changes. For a variety of reasons, once-healthy neurons (nerve cells) in the brain stop working, lose connections with other brain cells, and die.

Dementia can cause a significant decline in a person’s mental abilities by affecting their capacity for things like memory, thinking and reasoning.

Although people in the earliest stages of dementia often sense the something is wrong, the illness eventually deprives them of the insight necessary to understand their problems. So it’s usually up to a family member or friend to recognize the symptoms. The Alzheimer’s Association,  Know the 10 Signs brochure highlights a list of 10 signs that should not be ignored.

  1. Memory loss that is severe enough to disrupt daily life-for example, asking for information over and over again.
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems, such as trouble following a recipe or keeping track of monthly bills.
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work, or at leisure-for example, trouble driving to a familiar location.
  4. Confusion over time or place.
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships, including difficulty judging distances and determining color.
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing, including difficulty following or joining a conversation.
  7. Putting things in unusual places and being unable to find them again.
  8. Decreased or poor judgement-for example, giving large amounts of money to telemarketers or paying less attention to personal hygiene.
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities.
  10. Changes in mood and personality, including becoming suspicious, depressed, fearful, or anxious.

If after reading this list you are worried about yourself or someone close to you, arrange for a medical evaluation. Making a diagnosis of dementia requires a thorough examination by a physician. Many forms of dementia are not reversible, but early detection provides an opportunity to minimize other medical conditions that may bring on severe dementia symptoms earlier than they might otherwise show.

If you would like to learn more about your memory, please join us at 10a.m. on Wednesdays in May for the Virtual Master of Memory. These four sessions will be offered online. Sessions will include information on memory strategies, nutrition, medications, medical conditions, and exercise for the body and mind.

Sessions are free – but registration is required. You may register here: https://go.osu.edu/masterofmemory

Written by: Kathy Tutt, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension-Clark County, tutt.19@osu.edu

Reviwed by: Roseanne Scammahorn, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension-Darke County, scammahorn.5@osu.edu

Sources:

Alzheimer’s Association, https://www.alz.org/

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Dementia-Information-Page

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Older sitting at table playing card game

Nutrition and physical activity are key components to a healthy lifestyle. However, mental activity is another factor that plays an important role in a healthy lifestyle, as well as healthy brain aging. Mental activity maintains cognitive health. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, there are things we can do be doing to help reduce the risk of dementia and promote healthy brain aging. This includes staying physically active, eating a well balance diet, not smoking or drinking alcohol, getting adequate sleep, and exercising your mind.

Blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and bananas in container on counter

First, I’ll zone in on diet and foods to add that are especially important for brain health. Foods to encourage include: berries, fresh vegetables (especially leafy greens), healthy fats (almonds, cashews, walnuts, extra virgin olive oil), and fish/seafood. Berries make a fruit parfait colorful and appealing, yet nutritious. Top your favorite oatmeal with some almonds or walnuts for some plant-based protein.  There isn’t one “magic food,” but they key is to include a variety of foods and color in your diet each day. Additionally, omega 3 fatty acids have been extensively researched and their positive impact on brain health should not be ignored. Fish is rich in omega 3 fatty acids, and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends consuming ~8 ounces per week of a variety of seafood. If fish isn’t your favorite, other source of omega 3 fatty acids that promote healthy brain aging are walnuts, olive oil, canola oil and flax seed.

Not only is diet important for healthy aging but exercising your mind by challenging yourself is optimal for healthy brain aging. One strategy to sharpen your mind is to keep learning. Harvard Medical School indicates advanced education may be beneficial to a stronger memory by habitually being mentally active. Mental exercise is thought to activate processes that help to maintain individual brain cells and stimulate communication among them. In addition to taking on a new class, one could read or listen to a book, play chess, do Sudoku or crossword puzzles, play games, learn a new language, or cook a new recipe.

Whenever I go to visit my 94 year old grandma, we always have to play a game, or two, of Skip-Bo. She enjoys doing any type of puzzles, word searches, and various games.  Not only is it good for her to keep her brain sharp, she’s also able to engage in conversation and socially interact with others. The key is to try new activities that use skills you usually don’t use. Challenge yourself or your family member to think a different way. Maintaining brain connections is a continuing process, so make learning a priority throughout the life span.

In addition to a well-balanced diet, and exercising your brain, sleep is another important factor to consider that promotes healthy brain aging. Again, according to Harvard Medical School, there is a strong link between adequate sleep and cognitive health. Neurobiological processes that happen while we sleep influence our mood, energy level and cognitive fitness. It plays a vital role in memory, as well as enhancing attention, problem solving, and creativity. Try limiting your use of electronic devices before bedtime, as the blue light can interfere with your sleep patterns. The National Sleep Foundation recommends 7-9 hours for adults (26-64) and 7-8 hours of sleep for older adults (65+).

As we can see, there are many different factors to consider in order to strengthen our mental skills and memory so we decrease our chances of cognitive delay. This short, two minute video, reminds us that we can keep our brain active by still doing things you love!

Written By: Shannon Smith, RD, Program Coordinator, smith.11604@osu.edu and Susan Zies, M.Ed, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

Reviewed By: Lisa Barlage, M.S., Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County

Sources:

Harvard Health Publishing, https://www.health.harvard.edu/

National Sleep Foundation, https://www.sleepfoundation.org/

AARP, https://www.aarp.org/

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brainThere’s no denying that as we age, our brains age along with our bodies. We have a growing population of aging adults interested in learning strategies to help reduce memory loss. The good news is that you can improve your chances of maintaining a healthy brain if you choose some of the following brain boosting tips:

  • Start your day with a good night’s sleep.
  •  Eat breakfast. Studies have found that eating breakfast improves short-term memory and attention. Good choices include high-fiber whole grains, dairy, and fruits. Don’t overeat: high-calorie breakfasts appear to hinder concentration.
  •  Cinnamon helps boost activity in the brain by removing nervous tension and memory loss. Love the smell of cinnamon?  You might want to invest in some cinnamon-scented candles to boost cognitive function, memory, and increase alertness and concentration.
  • Eat two servings of fish weekly. Fish are rich in the omega-3 fatty acids that support brain health. Fish consumption has been linked to lower risk for dementia, stroke, and mental decline.
  • Eat some nuts and chocolate. Nuts and seeds are good sources of vitamin E, which has been linked in studies to a lessening of cognitive decline. Dark chocolate in particular has powerful antioxidant properties and contains natural stimulants like caffeine, which can enhance focus.
  • Add avocados. Although avocados contain fat; it’s a good-for-you, monounsaturated fat that helps support healthy blood flow.
  • Research indicates that the antioxidants in tomatoes and blueberries may help protect the brain from damage caused by free radicals. This in turn may reduce the effects of age-related conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.
  • Listen to music. Music promotes memory retention in older adults with dementia by helping the mind move.

Relationships between nutrients and brain health strategies are continually being explored. Eating a well-rounded diet may give your brain the best chance of avoiding disease.

Resources:

Author: Marie Economos, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Trumbull County, Western Reserve EERA, economos.2@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Donna Green, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, Erie Basin EERA, green.308@osu.edu

 

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