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Posts Tagged ‘burnout’

I have officially made it through one week of working from home and I’m going to be honest with you: It feels like I’m stuck in the movie Groundhog’s Day with no end in sight. I have three small children under the age of eight that demand a lot of my time and energy. I’m trying to find a new routine for our family during the temporary stay at home order. Sometimes, I feel that what I’m doing seems mundane. There are times where I feel like a broken record, repeating the same phrases continually. I know that I have put myself on the backburner. I’m often exhausted after helping everyone else and I don’t have the strength to do anything for me. My mind and body have given me signs that I need to take time for myself, such as these signals:

  1. Nothing sounds fun anymore
  2. Wanting to eat “All the things”
  3. Feeling overwhelmed by little things
  4. Snapping at loved ones
  5. Wanting to hide in the bedroom… or bathroom… or closet…

I’m sure I’m not the only one who goes to the bathroom for a little peace and quiet. Those five signals are letting me know that I’m not taking care of myself. I feel guilty scheduling time for myself, but know I shouldn’t. Someone once explained it to me using this analogy:

When flying on an airplane they tell you that if the cabin pressure changes you must put your own air mask on first. Then, you help the others around you. This is no different for us, we need to take care of ourselves first so we can better help the ones around us.

I know I will be a stronger, healthier person if I take time to refuel and recharge. In no way, shape, or form can I take an hour every day or spend lots of money on self care. However, there are things I can do that just take a few minutes and require items I already have on hand. Implementing these small ideas and changes can make all the difference in the world:

a person meditating
  • Sit on a porch and watch the clouds go by
  • Call a friend just to chat and check-up on them-no agenda needed
  • Exercise. Go for a run, walk up a flight of steps or take a walk around the block.
  • Breathe. Take a few minutes to take some deep breaths and clear your mind.
  • Spend time with a pet
  • Read a book
  • Take a nap
  • Soak in the bathtub
  • Wake up 30 minutes before the rest of your house
  • Temporally unplug from electronic devices
  • Listen to positive, uplifting music
  • Mediate or pray

For additional ideas and resources check out Why “Me” Time Matters When It Comes to Your Happiness.

My challenge to myself is to make “me” time a priority and schedule my time everyday. I will hold myself to it just like I would any other meeting. I would love to hear what your “me” time consists of.

Written by: Amanda Bohlen, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County.

Reviewed by:  Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County.

Sources:

Ebba, A. (2019, May 9). 5 Signs Your Brain and Body Are Begging for “Alone Time.” Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/time-for-alone-time#5

Shaw, G. (2015, September 4). A Women’s Guide to “Me” Time. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/women/guide/womans-guide-to-me-time#1https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/time-for-alone-time#4

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