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Posts Tagged ‘chickpeas’

Picture of different noodle types

When asked what my favorite food is, my answer is always the same – Pasta! I love the variety of noodle types and ways it can be prepared. From pasta salad as a cold dish in the summer to warm chicken noodle soup in the fall and winter, pasta can be enjoyed at any time of the year!

Looking throughout history, it seems I am not alone in this love. Depictions of individuals making and eating pasta have been found all over the world, and in many different cultures. Artwork in a 4th century B.C. Etruscan tomb shows a group making a pasta-like food. Across the continent, people in ancient China were also making noodles around the same time as the Etruscans. Early colonists brought noodle-making to America, where they would cover their cooked noodles with cheese or a cream sauce.

Today, there are many alternatives to try in place of the commonly used noodle made of durum wheat. One popular method is making noodles from vegetables such as zucchini, summer squash, or spaghetti squash. These veggie noodles are created using a spiralizer or vegetable peeler and can have a similar shape and texture to traditional noodles, but are lower in carbohydrates and calories. They are also a great way to include more vegetables in your diet!

Another alternative pasta includes chickpea noodles. Chickpeas (also known as garbanzo beans) are a type of legume called pulses – great sources of protein, fiber, and many vitamins and minerals. According to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, pulses are considered to be in both the “vegetable group” as well as the “protein group.” Pasta made from chickpeas generally does not contain wheat flour and is often compatible with special diets such as gluten-free, low carb, and vegetarian.

Pasta dishes can be a way to bring more whole grains into your diet as well. Many common pasta shapes are also available in whole wheat options. When looking at pasta packages in your local grocery store, look out for the whole grain stamp. This yellow stamp on the box will tell you if the noodles inside contain at least half a serving of whole grains.  

Whole Grain Food Stamps

When making pasta for your next dinner, be sure to pair your noodles with healthier sauces, herbs, and vegetables. Visit the Celebrate Your Plate website for some great recipes and ideas.

What pasta dishes are your family’s favorites?

Written by:  Jessica Lowe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Pickaway County, lowe.495@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Sources: 

Celebrate Your Plate (2022). Recipes. https://celebrateyourplate.org/recipes?query=pasta

Garden-Robinson, J. (2017). Pulses: The Perfect Food. Northern Pulse Growers Association. https://www.ndsu.edu/agriculture/sites/default/files/2022-07/fn1508.pdf

Meehan, A. (2017). Oodles of Zoodles. Live Smart Ohio. https://livesmartohio.osu.edu/food/meehan-89osu-edu/oodles-of-zoodles/

National Pasta Association (n.d.). History of Pasta. https://sharethepasta.org/pasta-101/pasta-iq/history-of-pasta/

Oldways Whole Grains Council (n.d.). Identifying Whole Grains. https://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/identifying-whole-grain-products

Wheat Foods Council (n.d.). Classes of Wheat. http://wheatfoods.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/6classes.pdf

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traditional chickpea hummus

Hummus is a chickpea-based dip and spread that is a staple food and popular appetizer in many Middle Eastern nations such as Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Israel. Today, according to the USDA, hummus is growing in popularity in the United States, too! This trend is driven by consumer demand for healthier snacks and gluten-free products.

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are naturally gluten-free; high in fiber, folate and protein; and they contain nutrients such as iron, calcium and magnesium.  Consequently, hummus provides more nutrients, more healthy fat and less unhealthy fat than many traditional American dips and spreads. The protein, healthy fat and fiber it contains can help you feel full, which can help with weight control. These nutrients can also help prevent heart disease and stabilize blood sugar. However, portion control is important with hummus, as the calories from the healthy fat it contains may add up quickly. A two-tablespoon portion of hummus contains about 70 calories. Hummus sold at the grocery store may contain large quantities of added sodium, too.

Luckily, hummus is not difficult to make at home. Classic hummus contains chickpeas, olive oil, tahini (a sesame paste), lemon juice and spices. For additional flavor or color, try including fresh herbs or vegetables such as roasted red peppers, sun dried tomatoes, beets, edamame or artichoke hearts in your own personal recipe. Mash the ingredients with a fork or puree them in a food processor to obtain a dip-like or spreadable consistency. hummus plate with celery sticks and crackers

If you don’t have tahini at home, can’t find it in your local grocery store or simply don’t like its flavor, try this easy hummus recipe that utilizes plain, non-fat yogurt in its place.

Serve hummus with whole grain pita chips, wedges or crackers, or fresh cut vegetables like cucumber slices, carrot and celery sticks, bell pepper spears, grape tomatoes, or broccoli and cauliflower florets. You can also spread hummus on your favorite sandwich or wrap, or use it in place of mayonnaise in making a tasty tuna salad. Need more inspiration? Check out this list of 10 Ways to Enjoy Hummus!

Sources:

Fruits & Veggies More Matters. Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans): Nutrition, Selection & Storage. https://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/chickpeas-garbanzo-beans

Fruits & Veggies More Matters. Top 10 Ways to Enjoy Hummus. https://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/top-10-ways-to-enjoy-hummus/

Goldstein, J. Hummus. The Nutrition Source, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/hummus/

Gottfried, S. (2018). Is Hummus Actually Healthy? Here’s What the Experts Say. Time Health. http://time.com/5331376/is-hummus-actually-healthy-heres-what-the-experts-say/

Spend Smart. Eat Smart. After-School Hummus. Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. https://spendsmart.extension.iastate.edu/recipe/after-school-hummus/

USDA Economic Research Service (2017). Pulses Production Expanding as Consumers Cultivate a Taste for U.S. Lentils and Chickpeas. https://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2017/januaryfebruary/pulses-production-expanding-as-consumers-cultivate-a-taste-for-us-lentils-and-chickpeas/

Written by: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

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