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Posts Tagged ‘Daily reflections’

stay at home

With so many aspects of our lives disrupted recently, a lot of people may be feeling anxious and overwhelmed over the current stay-at-home order.  Many are learning how to work from home, navigate through the home-schooling process, and balance the many changes in daily routines.

We all live busy lives.  This new “style” of life has altered our everyday routines and is likely impacting work life/home life balance.

Recently, at a conference I attended, the keynote speaker Theresa Glomb gave an inspiring talk on improving work life. This theme also relates to our overall daily lives and provides a relevant message with easy action steps. Consider using these four steps to improve your stay at home work life:

  • Work Hard
  • Have Fun
    • Create a positive home environment.
    • Use technology to stay connected to family, friends and neighbors. Video chat play trivia games or start a virtual book club. Remember to monitor children’s usage on any digital social app.
    • Use technology to learn something new. Take an online cooking class, watch a virtual concert or experience zoos, museums and aquariums online.
    • Choose a book to read a chapter out loud each night with your family.
    • Play board games, card games or do a jigsaw puzzle.
daffidols
  • Choose Kind
    • Text a co-worker and ask how their evening was last night.
    • Give a compliment for a job well done.
    • Express gratitude to essential workers (first responders, health care professionals, etc.) who are on the front lines.
    • Practice self-care. Exercise daily, using online physical activities if needed. Stick to your sleep routine and eat healthy meals.
  • Be Present     
    • Uni-task. Pay attention by focusing on the task at hand.
    • Engage in mindful practices daily.
    • Stay positive.
    • Reflect on one good thing that happened at the end of each day at dinner.

These changes are temporary and when things return to normal, we will all have learned valuable lessons to continue to use daily.

Written by:   Beth Stefura, OSU Extension Educator, Mahoning County. stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Jenny Lobb, OSU Extension Educator, Franklin County.  lobb.3@osu.edu

References:

Theresa Glomb. https://www.theresaglomb.com/

Ohio Department of Health. Stay at Home Order FAQs. https://coronavirus.ohio.gov/wps/portal/gov/covid-19/home/stay-at-home-information/stay-at-home-order-frequently-asked-questions

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On New Year’s Eve we realize more than at any other time in our lives that we can never go back in time.  We can look back and remember, but we cannot retrace a single moment of the year that has past.  Additionally, we may fear the future because of events in the past.  But we need not remain chained into our memories because we can move ahead.  The old familiar saying, “Out with the old, in with the new”, is appropriate as we embark upon the New Year . . . personally and professionally.  It’s a time to reflect upon our accomplishments for the past year and plan for the year ahead.  However, in order to begin anew, we must release the old.  According to Michael Angier of SuccessNet.org (2009), “a trapeze artist cannot swing from one bar to another without letting go, thus in order to prepare for the New Year, we must review the past year – release it – and learn from it.”

Our busy schedules and hectic pace of life can take a toll on our time and energy.  Daily we find we have places to go, people to see and a never-ending to-do list, with little time for daily rest, reflection and an the opportunity to re-focus our priorities.

According to Angier (2009), setting aside time for daily reflection is part of our personal development and time well spent.  I’m sure you’ve heard the saying, “don’t just sit there, do something.”  I’m suggesting, “just sit there, allow yourself time to reflect.”  Connect with those you love.  Practice journaling, jot down your thoughts and feelings. Write a letter to yourself; it can be very insightful to write and interesting to read it in the future.

According to Angier, here are some suggestions to get you started in reflecting on the past year . . . or, a year in review.

What did you learn about yourself?

What did you accomplish? How did you feel?

What were the most significant events of the year?  List your top three.

What would you have done differently, if anything?

What was your greatest contribution to your family?

What do you feel especially good about?

What were the fun things you did?

Did you try anything new in 2011? (skill, hobby, sport, etc.)

How are you different this year than last?

Anything you can do to make the year ahead more powerful in terms of your own personal and professional growth will be time well spent.  I challenge you to establish a regular, daily reflective practice.  Grab and create every opportunity, relish every moment, both large and small; don’t miss opportunities to celebrate “life”.

Source:  Michael Angier, SuccessNet.Org

Written by: Cindy Shuster, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension.

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