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Posts Tagged ‘dairy foods’

Dairy monthJune is National Dairy Month. There are over 2,500 dairy farms in Ohio and West Virginia. These hardworking dairy families work around-the-clock to produce safe, high quality milk. Let’s take the time this month to honor these families that provide us with milk and dairy foods. The American Dairy Association Mideast is having Farmer Fridays on Facebook during the month of June. Every Friday at noon you can watch them go live from a different Ohio dairy farm. They will tour the farm so you can see what goes on behind the scenes.

Dairy products provide us with calcium, potassium, Vitamin D, and protein. They can reduce the risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and Type 2 diabetes. Dairy products can help lower blood pressure and of course, they are good for bones.

When selecting dairy products look for low-fat or fat-free varieties. A serving size of 3 cups is recommended for anyone over the age of nine. Check this list to find what the equivalent is for 1 cup of dairy.

Do you struggle with getting enough dairy? Try some of these tips:

  • Yogurt fruit smoothie
  • Add milk to oatmeal
  • Top casseroles with low-fat shredded cheese
  • Make pudding with fat-free or low-fat milk for a dessert
  • Include milk as a beverage at meals

One dairy product I would like to highlight that isn’t consumed enough is plain, nonfat Greek yogurt. All yogurts provide us with calcium, potassium, protein, zinc, and vitamins B6 and B12. However, Greek yogurt is thicker, creamier, lower in lactose, contains probiotic cultures, and has twice the amount of protein! Since there is more protein in Greek yogurt, it helps keep you feeling full longer which helps with weight control. What’s your favorite way to eat plain, nonfat Greek yogurt?

Greek Yogurt Recipes to try:Greek Yogurt

Honey Mustard Yogurt Chicken Skewers

Overnight Oatmeal

Banana Split Greek Yogurt Pancakes

Roasted Red Pepper Greek Yogurt Hummus

Light and Creamy Barbecue Chicken Salad

 

Sources:

Goard, L., & Oliveri, C. (2015, February 20). Putting MyPlate on Your Table: Dairy. Retrieved from https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/SS-150

Higgins, S. (2018, June 1). June Dairy Month. Retrieved from https://www.drink-milk.com/june-dairy-month/

National Center for Complimentary Health (October 2016). Probiotics: In Depth. Retrieved from https://nccih.nih.gov/health/probiotics/introduction.htm

Zelman, K. M. (2010). 6 Best Foods You’re Not Eating. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/best-foods-you-are-not-eating#1

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension,  Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

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In our efforts to improve nutrition and choose “healthy foods”, it can sometimes be a challenge to know what is healthy and what is not. One measure of how a food fits in to your efforts to “eat healthy” is to look at how many important nutrients the food provides for the amount of calories it delivers. Our best bet is to choose foods that deliver the most nutrients – protein, vitamins and minerals – for the fewest calories. Avoiding empty calories is also a good goal. Low-fat dairy foods can be an important part of this plan. Dairy products that have some or all of the fat removed still contain all of the “good” nutrients we want.

girl drinking milkTogether, low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt provide a unique package of nine essential nutrients that improve overall diet quality and promote good health. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recognize that milk and milk products are linked to improved bone health, especially in children and teens, and a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure in adults.

What the Dietary Guidelines for Americans Say about Dairy Foods
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) encourage all Americans to increase intakes of low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products to the recommended daily amounts:

• 2 cups for children 2 to 3 years
• 2.5 cups for children 4 to 8 years
• 3 cups for those 9 years and older

Milk is the number one food source, in terms of consumption, for three of the four nutrients the DGA identified as lacking in the American diet – calcium, vitamin D and potassium.

According to the DGA, individuals who consume milk at an early age are more likely to do so as adults, so it is especially important to establish in young children the habit of drinking milk. Current evidence indicates intake of milk and milk products is linked to improved bone health, especially in children and adolescents. For women, around 40 percent of initial bone mass is achieved in the first 20 years of life, underscoring the importance of early bone development and health.

Nutrient-Rich Foods, Like Dairy
A positive approach to healthy eating does more than monitor calorie intake – it also maintains a diet that offers maximum vitamins, minerals and essential nutrients. Nutrient-rich foods, like dairy foods, provide essential vitamins, minerals and other nutrients for fewer calories. Nutrient-rich foods from each food group include:

• Brightly colored fruits and 100 percent fruit juices,
• Vibrant-colored vegetables and potatoes,
• Whole, fortified and fiber-rich grain foods,
• Low-fat and fat-free milk, cheese and yogurt, and
• Lean meat, skinless poultry, fish, eggs, beans and nuts.

Dairy’s Health Benefits
Research has shown that:
• Osteoporosis – Dairy’s nutrients are vital to the development of strong bones thus reducing the risk for developing osteoporosis.
• Healthy Weight – Milk and dairy foods may also play a positive role in maintaining a healthy weight.
• Healthy Blood Pressure – Three minerals found in dairy foods – calcium, potassium and magnesium – may play an important role in maintaining healthy blood pressure.
• Cardiometabolic syndrome, Cardiovascular disease, type 2 Diabetes – Current evidence indicates that the consumption of dairy foods is associated with a reduced risk of Cardiometabolic syndrome – a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease – and type 2 Diabetes.

Author: Polly Loy, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Belmont County, Buckeye Hills EERA.
Reviewed by: Kathryn Dodrill, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, Buckeye Hills EERA
References: Dairy Foods and Nutrition Fact Sheet, Midwest Dairy Council, http://www.midwestdairy.com, March 2012.
USDA 2010 Dietary Guidelines, http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DietaryGuidelines.htm
Nutrient Density Fact Sheet, Clemson University Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet, http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/nutrition/nutrition/dietary_guide/hgic4062.html

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If you pay much attention to health and nutrition news, you’ve probably heard about probiotics.  But for those of you who aren’t familiar with probiotics, here is a basic primer.

Probiotics are live, healthy bacteria in foods that we commonly consume.  The bacteria pass into our digestive tract and promote health by helping digest our food, synthesizing vitamin K, and maintaining the immune system. Although research is still being done, some studies have also shown that probiotics may help regluate inflammation and decrease the incidence of colitis and  inflammatory bowel disease.

Healthy bacteria, or microflora, are frequently found in yogurt and fermented foods such as kefir, buttermilk and sauerkraut.  The most common microbes used as probiotics include lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria.  However, some yeasts and bacilli are also used in probiotics.  Since our intestines contain several different species of bacteria, many people believe supplementing that bacteria will help form new colonies of microflora that further benefits health.  In contrast, prebiotics are not bacteria but are typically non-digestible carbohydrates such as soy beans, raw oats, or unrefined wheat which help stimulate the growth of bacteria in the gut that is also beneficial to health.

In addition to fermented dairy/food products, live probiotic cultures are also available in a tablet, capsule, or powder form.  Be sure to check with your medical professional before purchasing a probiotic .   Products vary in quality and purity, as with any supplement.  Check with your physician or the manufacturer for research to support any health claims made by the company.

Source:  Department of Public Affairs, Children’s Hospital, Boston

Author:  Jennifer Even, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Hamilton County.

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