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Posts Tagged ‘eye health’

President Barack Obama has proclaimed November 2016 as National Diabetes Month. In his proclamation he states, “I call upon all Americans, school systems, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, health care providers, research institutions, and other interested groups to join in activities that raise diabetes awareness and help prevent, treat, and manage the disease.” Today’s blog is one effort to help in raise awareness and inform you about a free online educational opportunity to learn more about managing diabetes.

idf_infographics_en-2Additionally, November 14, 2016 is World Diabetes Day. It was created by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization in response to rising concerns about the increasing health risks of diabetes. This year’s theme is EYES ON DIABETES. Its focus is on the importance of screening to ensure early diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

One in two adults with diabetes is undiagnosed. Diabetes is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower limb amputations. Over one-third of all people currently living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes will develop some form of damage to their eyes that can lead to blindness. These complications can be prevented or delayed by maintaining proper blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels.  Screenings can detect complications in their early stages and treatment plans can prevent vision loss.

Healthy eating also is an important part of managing all types of diabetes. Do you want to learn more about healthy eating and diabetes?  A team of Ohio State University Extension educators and researchers have developed a self-paced online course to help participants learn, share and chat with health professionals about managing diabetes.The course, Dining with Diabetes: Beyond the Kitchen focuses on carbohydrates, fats, sodium, vitamins, minerals and fiber. The easy to follow three-module course includes lessons, videos and activities to complete.

Participants can expect to learn:

  • How important blood sugar and carbohydrates are for managing diabetes.
  • How fats and sodium affect a healthy diet.
  • The role vitamins, minerals and fiber play in a healthy diet.
  • How to make healthy food choices when eating out and grocery shopping.

After completion of the course, participants receive a printable certificate. They are also automatically entered in a quarterly drawing for a $100 Amazon.com gift card.

Sign up is easy and free. Visit go.osu.edu/DWD_BTK and click “buy now.” The course will be added to cart for checkout at no cost. After completing the transaction, participant will be required to create an account with campus.extension.org to take advantage of all the materials.

Written by: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County

Reviewed by: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension

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carrots

The Easter Bunny came to visit a couple of weeks ago, and while he was here he ate some nice, healthy carrots. We need to follow his example, because his favorite food is actually one awesome vegetable.

A 10-year study recently completed in the Netherlands shows that carrot intake can greatly reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We all remember our moms telling us to eat carrots to protect our eyes, but our heart? Not so much. So this study is really eye-opening (excuse the pun, I couldn’t resist).

Research participants were asked to eat fruits and vegetables from four main color categories: green, orange/yellow, red/purple, and white. Of the four categories, orange/yellow was found to be the most protective against cardiovascular disease (especially foods with deeper shades of orange).

Participants who ate at least one-fourth cup of carrots (about 2-3 baby carrots) per day had a lessened risk for CVD, and participants who ate the most (one-half to three-fourths cup per day) had a significantly lowered risk.

Carrots have always been known as a good source of antioxidants in terms of their beta-carotene content. But they also contain phytonutrients called polyacetylenes, which help inhibit the growth of colon cancer cells. Cancer, eye, and heart protection—who knew the humble carrot had all that going on?

Planting

If you are putting in a garden this summer and have never tried growing carrots, this might be the summer to give them a spin. Carrots are easy to grow from seed, so the initial expense is minimal. For your first effort, consider miniature carrots.  They have small, shallow roots that are quite sweet and grow well in soils with some clay content (that’s us, folks).

You can begin planting carrots in mid-April. Start by loosening the soil in the planting bed at least 8- 12 inches deep, rake smooth, and then sow seeds about a quarter inch deep. Seeds should be spaced approximately two inches apart. You don’t need to plant all the seeds at once; judge how many to plant by your family size. For a continuous supply of young carrots, start a new row of seeds approximately every three weeks.

Harvesting

Pull carrots when mature in size and color. Twist off the long green tops to prevent moisture loss, and use a dry vegetable brush to remove any clumps of soil. At this point, there are two rules of thumb you can follow when it comes to carrot storage.

Some “dry camp” followers say to seal the unwashed carrots tightly in a plastic bag in the coolest part refrigerator and wash just before using. The “wet camp” followers believe carrots should be washed and placed in a container with water (which should be refreshed every 4-5 days). Your choice, but just make sure they are covered because carrots begin to go limp when exposed to air.  Most varieties keep for a month in the fridge if stored properly.

Written by:  Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Sources:

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0013609

http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/homegardening/scenea765.html

 

 

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