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Posts Tagged ‘family meals’

It is no secret that drug abuse is running rampant in Middle America. Over half a million Americans die every year from overdoses, accidents, illness, or other poor choices. I live in southern Ohio, an area that has been over whelmed with the opiate epidemic. I recently had the opportunity to attend an “Ohio State University Conversation on the Opioid Crisis” where I learned some things that we can all do to prevent the spread of drug abuse in our own communities. Here are a few things you can do to prevent drug use: family-eating

  • Have regular discussions with your children about the risks of drugs and alcohol. These discussions have been shown to result in a 50% reduction in use (Who knew?).  Be consistent, talk about the law, listen to what your children have to say, and control your emotions as you talk with them.
  • Have dinner together as a family – four or more times per week if possible. Research shows that teens who eat meals with their family are less likely to try tobacco, marijuana, alcohol, and other drugs. Use mealtime as a chance to find out what your children are up to, who their friends are, what is going on at school, and to encourage improving grades and school work. Make conversation at mealtime positive and encouraging. Turn off the TV, put cell phones away, and take out earbuds so everyone can talk and listen.  (As a side benefit, if you prepare some of these meals together you will save money and teach your children to cook.)
  • Encourage children to be involved in extracurricular activities – sports, music, church activities, 4-H, Scouts, clubs, or volunteering. Not only should you encourage your child to be busy doing positive activities, but know where they are, who they are with, and when they will be home.
  • Decrease opportunities for exposure to addictive substances. Keep medication where children won’t happen upon it. When you finish taking the pain medication you were given after surgery, dispose of any that is left. Discuss this with older family members as well.  Literacy about medications and medication safety is key.
  • Set an example for children. Use prescription drugs properly, don’t use illegal drugs, never drink and drive, and if you drink, drink in moderation. If you used drugs in the past, explain the problems that it may have caused for you or other family members. Discuss why you wouldn’t choose to do drugs now.
  • Remember you are the parent! Monitor your child’s TV and Internet viewing, games they are playing, music they are listening to or purchasing, maintain a curfew, make sure adults are present when teens are hanging out and check in with them when they get home from school, and keep track of their school work (they give us access to those grades on the Internet for a reason). Recognize children for the positives – did they raise a grade, achieve a PR (personal best) in running or swimming, or finish all their chores without nagging? If they did, let them select the Sunday lunch meal, the movie you are watching together, or a new game to play together.

Parents and grandparents can have a powerful influence on protecting children from drug use and abuse. Take advantage of opportunities to talk about the risks of drugs and alcohol, and set an example for your own children and their friends. Volunteer to drive your child and their friends/teammates to events, or allow your child to invite a friend for family dinner on the weekend. When you have these opportunities – ask questions and listen, without criticism.

Sources:

Drug Free New Hampshire, http://drugfreenh.org/families

Start Talking Ohio, http://www.starttalking.ohio.gov/

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, http://www.centeronaddiction.org/

United States Food and Drug Administration, How to Dispose of Unused Drugs, http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm101653.htm

National Institute of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, https://easyread.drugabuse.gov/sites/default/files/EasyToRead_PreventDrugUse_012017.pdf

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Science, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, barlage.7@osu.edu.

Reviewer: James Bates, Assistant Professor/Field Specialist, Family Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, bates.402@osu.edu.

 

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veggiegirl2

According to MyPlate.gov, snacks can help kids get nutrients needed to grow.  This blog will show some ideas to help you make creative snacks with veggies & fruits. By making food fun, you may encourage your child to try something new. If possible, involve your child in food preparation or cooking. Kids like to try their creations!

Concerned about the cost of fresh vegetables and fruits? Select vegetables & fruits when they are “in season” or on sale. Make sure to buy enough, but not too much where you end up throwing it away.

  • Winter “In Season” vegetables & fruits include kiwi and citrus fruits like tangerines, clementines, oranges and grapefruit.
  • Spring “In Season” vegetables & fruits include snow peas, broccoli, greens, asparagus, strawberries and spinach.
  • Veggies & fruits that are readily available “year round” include bananas, celery, carrots, apples, potatoes & onions.

Here are some recipe ideas to try:

    • Veggie Kid. Add light ranch dip for the face of the kid and make the body out of vegetables & fruits you may have on hand.
    • Cheese and Crackers. Try the convenience of single serving string cheese and pair it with whole wheat crackers. To ramp up the veggies, add a few carrot sticks or apple wedges.
    • Make a fun “character” fruit tray. Easy and fun! The eyes in this fruit tray are hardboiled eggs. Watch the children “gobble” up the fruit.

Need more inspiration? Try these:

elmofruit

  • Apple Smiles made with peanut butter and raisins.
  • Fruit Kabobs. Use your favorite fruits for this fun snack!
  • Crunchy Berry Parfait. Use your favorite fruits in this easy favorite.
  • Cowboy Caviar. A favorite of adults and kids alike! Serve with whole grain chips, fill celery sticks or top a salad with this tasty salsa.

Remember that some children don’t like foods that are mixed up. If this is the case, serve them individually.

Final Tips:

  • Make it easy to choose add-ins. Try hummus, creamy vegetable dip made with yogurt, or applesauce with a little “crunch” (granola or cereal) and cinnamon.
  • Let them pick a new vegetable or fruit to try if you take them grocery shopping.

What ideas do you have to add more veggies & fruits to your day? Post your ideas in the comment section.

Sources:

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach (2017). Spend Smart. Eat Smart. http://extension.iastate.edu

USDA (2016). MyPlate snack tips for parents. MyPlate, MyWins. www.choosemyplate.gov

USDA What’s Cooking? Recipe Finder available from https://whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/

Photo credits:

Jennifer Driesbach, driesbach.2@osu.edu

Michelle Treber, treber.1@osu.edu

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin county, lobb.3@osu.edu

 

 

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Does your family regularly eat together?  December 3 (Dine-In Day) is a good time to start or make it a habit to share a meal together as a family.  Sharing a meal can
happen at any time during the day, breakfast, lunch orfamily meal
dinner.   Try to make it a healthy meal by following My Plate.   You don’t have to prepare all or any of the food for the meal, it could be take-out food or even eating at a restaurant. The most important part is sitting down together at the table. Turn off television, phones, screens or other distractions and talk together.

Eating together as a family has been shown to provide benefits to your child in recent research by Musick and Meier.  These benefits are just from eating healthy meals together:

  • 35% are less likely to develop eating disorders
  • 24% are more likely to eat healthy
  • 12% are less likely to become overweight
  • The family will feel the benefits of closeness and comfort which provides                         stability.
  • Other researchers found children are less likely to develop depression symptoms and have less delinquency.

Past research showed additional benefits but didn’t account for other family factors.  The following benefits will continue to develop in many children but can not be associatfamily-eating-at-the-table-619142_640ed due only to family meals:

  • Children are more likely to have better mental health and avoid substance use and delinquency.
  • Children have greater academic achievement.
  • Children show improved psychological well-being.
  • The family has more positive interactions.

Here are some recommendations of getting started having family meals or keeping it a priority:

  1. Choose a meal or different set of meals you will share together as a family.
  2. Set a goal of sharing a family meal at least three times a week.
  3. Realize your family will gain closeness and comfort as they eat meals together.  This can provide some stability for your children, especially during times of turmoil.
  4. Make sure the time is quality time by turning off television, phones, screens and other distractions. Ask your children questions and talk together.  Make it a happy time together, no criticism or complaining.

Commit to participating in “Dine In” Day by clAAFCS_Day_Logo_2015ouicking on this link http://www.aafcs.org/FCSday/index.html  and signing up. to participate. Take a picture of your family eating a healthy meal together and post on their Facebook page, Twitter, and/or Instagram using #FCSday and #healthyfamselfie.    Share your pictures with me on Twitter at #93brinkman and post on our Live  Healthy Live Well Facebook page.

Author:  Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension Fayette County

Reviewer:  Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County

References

American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, (2016).  “ Dine-In” With Us!  Available at http://www.aafcs.org/FCSday/index.html

Cook, E. and Dunifon, R. (2016). Do Family Meals Really Make a Difference?  Cornell University.  Available at http://www.human.cornell.edu/pam/outreach/upload/Family-Mealtimes-2.pdf

USDA, Choose My Plate, (2016).  Start with Small Changes, Available at https://www.choosemyplate.gov/start-small-changes

 

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We are at a point in our life where all our children are adults and moving out on their own. As they leave my home, one hope is that they appreciated the importance of family meals. Family meals go beyond the food that is prepared and consumed.  A great fact sheet from University of Flopink reciperida Extension used the letters in the word RECIPE to breakdown the importance of effective communication that family meals can provide.  Communicating with everyone in the family about healthy eating and the importance of physical activity is a great idea!  As attention increases over childhood weight issues and obesity, these discussions gain more significance.

The article breaks down each letter in the word RECIPE.  Each letter and an accompanying description follow:

– Reflective Listening

E – Encouragementrecipe

– Compromise and Cooperation

– “I”-messages

P – Practice

E – Engagement

The “R” is for Reflective listening, the vital skill of actively listening to those who are speaking.  Someone who is actively listening may ask questions, restate what was said, and understand or put themselves in other person’s shoes.  To a child’s statement of “I don’t want to eat that” a reflective listener might respond with a statement such as, “Sometimes it is hard to try new things”.

Encouragement, “E”, is appreciating what another has to say.  These responses may praise one another and offer supportive.  Encouragement helps keep the lines of communication open.

“C” doubly represents Compromise and Cooperation which allow family members to find solutions to conflict and disagreements.  When parents role model and encourage, “compromise and cooperation” conversations will likely lead to solutions that can be agreed upon by all.

“I” Messages are a s
pecific way of telling others how one feels.  An “I” message communicates to another how his or her behavior causes you to think or feel.  An example of an “I” message would be “I feel badly when I cook a big meal and no one is home to eat it” as opposed to a “You” statement such as “I don’t like what you have made for dinner.  I’ll make something myself.”

Practice is for “P” the fifth letter in the RECIPE communication acronym.  Practice is needed for any new skill to become a habit.  Practice requires patience and effort.

The “E” in RECIPE stands for Engagement.  This is defined as the level of involvement of each family member in the communication process.  This requires giving others your full attention.

Once all the letters of the RECIPE communication technique are blended together effective communication can start to take place.  This requires time and patience but can lead to better health and wellness for everyone in the family.

Author: Liz Smith, M.S., RDN, L.D. Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences.

Reviewed by:  Cheryl Barber Spires, RD, LD, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences.

Source: Family Nutrition: A RECIPE for Good Communication.  Retrieved from: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1060.

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grocery

Do you have a plan when you make a trip to the grocery store?  You can save time and money by planning ahead before you head off on your trip.

  • Plan your meals using a worksheet such as, Create a Grocery Game Plan. This will help you make decisions about what you need to buy.
  • Go through your cabinets, refrigerator, and freezer to see what items you already have that can be incorporated into your meals.
  • Consider your schedule for the week……choose meals that are easy to prepare on busier days and save recipes for days when you have more time
  • Make a list of recipes you would like to try. Need help finding new ideas?  Try What’s Cooking? USDA Mixing Bowl for healthy, low-cost recipes using items you already have on hand.

Now that you know what you will be cooking each week, use your list of weekly meals to create a list of foods and drinks you need to buy.  Be sure to include fruits, vegetables, and milk even though they may not be part of any of the recipes you have planned for the week.

Time to make your list:

  • You can use scrap paper or the back of an envelope.
  • Type your list on a computer
  • Type your list in the “notes” section of your smartphonegrocery 2
  • Download a free mobile app for grocery lists
  • Use this template to make your list

Once your meals are planned and your list made, here are a few tips to help you get the most for your dollar.

  • Read the sale flyer(s) for the stores you plan to visit to see what is on sale from your grocery list. You can find sale info at the store’s entrance, in the newspaper, and on the store’s website.
  • Use coupons for as many items on your list as you can. They can be found as inserts in newspapers each week, you can download coupons from the internet, and your grocery store most likely has digital coupons on their website that can help you save even more.
  • Look for store brands that typically cost less than name brands.
  • Ask for a rain check if the store is out of a sale item. This is usually done at the customer service desk located in the front of the store. A rain check lets you pick up the item once they are back in stock.
  • Sign-up for your store’s customer loyalty program. This free program offers discounts and rewards to members.

Sources:

Pixabay.com

United States Department of Agriculture, http://www.choosemyplate.gov/sites/default/files/budget/grocery_list_interactive.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture, http://www.choosemyplate.gov/sites/default/files/budget/grocery_gameplan_interactive.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture, http://www.whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/

Writer: Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

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There is a lot of talk about the importance of family meals. Your school age children may eat both breakfast and lunch in their school cafeteria. This is why it is important that the meals you eat with them are opportunities to teach healthy eating behaviors. Hopefully your children will carry these behaviors to the school lunchroom, and other settings. Listed below are meal-time tips you can use to encourage these healthy behaviors at home.

* Children are sponges! They learn from watching parents and older siblings. Try to eat as a family whenever you can. Include a good variety of foods, including vegetables. This is also a great time for conversations and practicing table manners.

* Enjoy a lunch date! Talk about school meals and what your children are eating. Try to understand why they make the choices they do. Have a breakfast or lunch date at school every few months. Not only will you see what is offered at the school meals, you will also see what your child is choosing.

* Learn what they like! Food preferences need to be respected and acknowledged. Teach young children to say “No, thank you” politely if they do not want any more after a taste. Make sure that the focus is on the great taste of the new foods you are trying. Even at a young age, many kids associate “good for you” with “tastes bad.”

*Experiment with new foods! Encourage kids to try one bite so they can expand their horizons. berries

* Don’t give up! Serve the foods your children previously resisted. It often takes several times of introducing a food before children eat and enjoy it.

* Try to resist the “forbidden foods” label! All foods can be part of a healthy diet.

* Encourage them in meal preparation! Let kids help fix items according to their age and skill level. Children are more willing to try foods, especially if they helped prepare them. Even young children can tear lettuce, rinse broccoli or even set the table. Let them pick out a new fruit or vegetable to try the next time they go to the store with you.

* Be a creative cook! Cut foods into interesting shapes and make the plate attractive.

Vegetable Train
* Name foods with cute names and offer finger foods, such as sliced fruit and vegetables. Kids like inviting foods just like adults do. Try raw vegetables with light dips. Serve broccoli trees or cauliflower clouds.

* Give your time! Make the meal or snack your sole focus. Conversation is good. TVs or other electronics should wait until the snack or meal is complete.

* Allow them time to eat! Try not to rush the children when they eat. Time pressure puts stress on eating and makes it less pleasurable.

* A child’s world is play! Make eating a fun time. Include discussions about colors, textures and flavors.

* Grow it yourself! If you have a garden or a few plants, include the children in planting and harvesting the produce. Children who participate in planting foods, or at least see where their foods come from are more likely to try them. Many schools now have gardens or container gardens. If your child’s school has a garden, talk to them about the foods they are growing. This is a great way for you to be involved with your child’s school!

These are just a few simple ways we’ve found to get kids to explore the world of healthy food. If they work for you, please share them with all your friends!

Source: Duyff, Roberta L. American Dietetic Association- Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, 4th Edition, 2012.

Author: Liz Smith, Ohio State University Extension, Central Region SNAP-Ed, smith.3993@osu.edu

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

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National “Dine In Day” is today (December 3, 2015), but dining in with your family is important all the time. “Dine In Day” is sponsored by the AmeriDinner with Familycan Association of Family and Consumer Sciences to encourage families to reconnect and dine in. If you aren’t ready for “Dine In Day” yet, start planning now so you can begin dining in more often with your family. Numerous research studies report the benefits for children to eat family meals together:

  • Children who eat as a family make healthier food choices and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Teens that eat with their families are less likely to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and use illegal drugs.
  • Eating with families gives teen’s better self-esteem and are less likely to be depressed.
  • Young children model their parents and other adults; by eating meals together they are more likely to eat healthy foods like vegetables, low-fat proteins, fruits, and dairy foods.
  • Dining together builds communication between generations and bonds families, benefiting family members of all ages.

To get your family back in the habit of eating together and dining at home try starting small. Plan just two days a week that you are going to eat together (if you are eating out all the time now). Involve the whole family in the meal planning and preparation – ask others what they want to have or what sounds good for this week. Be sure to eat at the table together, eliminate distractions like TV or phones, and discuss positive/neutral topics.

If you don’t know where to start try these websites for inexpensive and quick family meal ideas:

What’s Cooking, USDA Mixing Bowl

Share Our Strength’s, Cooking Matters

Food Hero

Let us know what you decide to fix when you “Dine In”. In the comment section you can message us your favorite family meals or use the #hashtags #FCSday, #healthyfamselfie, or #DineInDay.

Sources:

American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences: http://www.aafcs.org/FCSday/

Washington State Dairy Council: http://ext100.wsu.edu/clark/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2014/02/eattogethereatbetter.pdf

University of Florida, Institute of Food and Science, https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy1061

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewers: Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County and Daniel Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension .

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