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Posts Tagged ‘family’

friends

There are many different facets of health. We think of health as eating well and exercising, yet health also includes our social interactions and connections.

We all tend to get busy in our lives and lose contact with our friends and family. July is a perfect time to build stronger social ties with family and friends and reach out to others.  Social Wellness encourages us to develop better communications with our friends and family and to spend time nurturing our relationships and ourselves.  Respect yourself and others and develop a solid social support system.  Check in with your family and friends.

On-line social networking has grown because of our need to be connected. It allows us to read status updates and get a glimpse of what is going on with our friends and family.  Yet, it is important to have a full conversation to maintain social wellness.

Grow your social network. Consider your interests and hobbies and you are bound to meet new people that share the same interest.

Social Wellness is important including:

  • People who have strong social networks live longer
  • People with healthy relationships respond better to stress and have healthier cardiovascular systems
  • Healthy social networks improve the immunes system’s ability to fight off infectious disease

Reconnect this month with your friends and family to strengthen your bonds and improve your social wellness. Be Well!

References: https://www.butler.edu/health-wellness/social                                                    http://www.fsap.emory.edu › Workplace Resources › Wellness

 

Author: Beth Stefura, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Mahoning County

Reviewer: Donna Green, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Erie County

 

 

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heart

 

Now is the time to review what you know about women and heart disease. Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States. One out of four women in the United States will die from heart disease, while one woman out of thirty dies of cancer. Four out of five women who are 40-60 years of age have at least one risk factor for heart disease.

Are You At Risk?                                         heart-rate

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Family history of heart disease
  • Over the age of 55
  • Smoking
  • Overweight or obese
  • no regular exercise
  • Diet high in saturated fat

 

Some risk factors like age and family history cannot be changed, but all women have the power to make diet and lifestyle choices that can reduce these risks.

Take Care of Your Heart

  • Reduce the sources of saturated fat in your diet
  • Limit or reduce eating fried foods. You can do this by choosing cooking methods that do not submerge food in oil. Use cooking methods like baking, broiling, and steaming instead.
  • Choose low fat or fat free dairy products
  • Remove and discard the skin from turkey or chicken to reduce the saturated fat in your diet
  • Avoid fats that are solid at room temperature. Change to poly or unsaturated oils like olive oil or canola oil
  • Reduce sodium intake by limiting processed foods

 

Smoking cessation is good for your lungs and your cardiovascular system. The chemicals in tobacco smoke damage cells and the vessels that carry blood throughout the body.A lifestyle that includes many risk factors like smoking,making unhealthful food choices, remaining overweight or obese,and not getting regular exercise all add to your risk of developing heart disease.  Make a great choice for your health and stop smoking, or reduce the number of times that you smoke, starting today!

Signs and Symptoms

Heart attack symptoms for women can easily be dismissed as stress or the flu. Do not brush off symptoms that may be signs or symptoms of a heart attack or stroke. Common signs of heart attack in women include:

  • Sweating, nausea, or feeling faint or lightheaded. Feeling pressure or a feeling of fullness in the chest. This may be consistent, or brief and then returning.
  • Feeling uncomfortable, achy or sore in either or both arms, neck or jaw pain, back pain, or even stomach discomfort.
  • Feeling short of breath, with or without chest pains

Sources:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: The Heart Truth: A Campaign for Women About Heart Disease, HHS, NIH, NHLBI

American Heart Association: Know Your Numbers? | Go Red For Women®

Authors: Laura Brubaker, Dietetic Intern with OSU Extension, Wood County. Graduate Student studying Food and Nutrition at Bowling Green State Universtiy and Susan Zies,  Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Wood County.

 

Reviewer:Dan Remley, Assistant Professor, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, OSU Extension

 

 

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veggiegirl2

According to MyPlate.gov, snacks can help kids get nutrients needed to grow.  This blog will show some ideas to help you make creative snacks with veggies & fruits. By making food fun, you may encourage your child to try something new. If possible, involve your child in food preparation or cooking. Kids like to try their creations!

Concerned about the cost of fresh vegetables and fruits? Select vegetables & fruits when they are “in season” or on sale. Make sure to buy enough, but not too much where you end up throwing it away.

  • Winter “In Season” vegetables & fruits include kiwi and citrus fruits like tangerines, clementines, oranges and grapefruit.
  • Spring “In Season” vegetables & fruits include snow peas, broccoli, greens, asparagus, strawberries and spinach.
  • Veggies & fruits that are readily available “year round” include bananas, celery, carrots, apples, potatoes & onions.

Here are some recipe ideas to try:

    • Veggie Kid. Add light ranch dip for the face of the kid and make the body out of vegetables & fruits you may have on hand.
    • Cheese and Crackers. Try the convenience of single serving string cheese and pair it with whole wheat crackers. To ramp up the veggies, add a few carrot sticks or apple wedges.
    • Make a fun “character” fruit tray. Easy and fun! The eyes in this fruit tray are hardboiled eggs. Watch the children “gobble” up the fruit.

Need more inspiration? Try these:

elmofruit

  • Apple Smiles made with peanut butter and raisins.
  • Fruit Kabobs. Use your favorite fruits for this fun snack!
  • Crunchy Berry Parfait. Use your favorite fruits in this easy favorite.
  • Cowboy Caviar. A favorite of adults and kids alike! Serve with whole grain chips, fill celery sticks or top a salad with this tasty salsa.

Remember that some children don’t like foods that are mixed up. If this is the case, serve them individually.

Final Tips:

  • Make it easy to choose add-ins. Try hummus, creamy vegetable dip made with yogurt, or applesauce with a little “crunch” (granola or cereal) and cinnamon.
  • Let them pick a new vegetable or fruit to try if you take them grocery shopping.

What ideas do you have to add more veggies & fruits to your day? Post your ideas in the comment section.

Sources:

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach (2017). Spend Smart. Eat Smart. http://extension.iastate.edu

USDA (2016). MyPlate snack tips for parents. MyPlate, MyWins. www.choosemyplate.gov

USDA What’s Cooking? Recipe Finder available from https://whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/

Photo credits:

Jennifer Driesbach, driesbach.2@osu.edu

Michelle Treber, treber.1@osu.edu

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin county, lobb.3@osu.edu

 

 

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Mcaregiverany women find that taking care of others – family, friends, and neighbors – becomes part of their normal day to day schedule.  While this can provide us with a great sense of fulfillment by helping others who need us, it often adds stress to our lives.  We find that we are not only cooking, cleaning, shopping, and care giving for our own family but many days doing these tasks for others.  This may include running errands and transporting them to doctor visits.

If you feel overwhelmed by all of the directions you are being pulled, I want you to know you are not alone and help is only a few paragraphs below.  There are many resources that can assist you with your tasks.

Be Prepared

  • All medicines should be locked up and out of the reach of children, teens and older adults who can be harmed by taking medications not prescribed to them.  This FDA video points out the dangers in having medicines accessible in a home.
  • A list of medications that can be accessible at any time. This list should include prescriptions, dietary supplements, vitamins and over-the-counter medicines.  You should take this list to all doctor visits and hospital visits.
  • Be sure you are giving the right amount of medicine. Follow the directions on the prescription and/or medicine.  You can also ask your physician about the dosage, especially when you are administering medicine to children.  Always use the measuring cup or device that is provided with the medicine.
  • Make a plan for how you will care for others in case of an emergency. This plan should include medical information and back up supplies.
  • Looking for guidance when it comes to eldercare? Try this Eldercare Locator link http://www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Index.aspx which will help you connect to services in your area for older adults and their families.

The FDA is a great resource to help you manage the care of your loved ones.  These resources provide a wide range of information to assist with those working with young children, teens, older adults, and those with special needs.

As you are doing all of the things you do, it is easy to forget about your own needs.  It is important that you take care of your own health.  With so many others depending on you, don’t let your personal care go to the bottom of your list.

  • Take time to care for yourself
  • Schedule a yearly exam and mammogram
  • Talk to your physician if you are having feelings of anxiety or depression
  • Manage your stress

We are connected to others and being a caregiver affects us emotionally.  How to better handle these emotions can be found at Tips for Caregivershttps://livehealthyosu.com/2016/01/11/tips-for-caregivers/.  Read What Caregivers Need to Knowhttps://livesmartohio.osu.edu/family-and-relationships/holmes-86osu-edu/what-caregivers-need-to-know/ to learn more about recent data and respite care.  When it comes to caregiving there is so much to learn and know.  So remember information, support, and resources are out there…you are not alone.

Writer: Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Reviewer: Candace J. Heer, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Morrow County, heer.7@osu.edu

Sources:

Eldercare Locator, http://www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Index.aspx

FDA, http://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForConsumers/ByAudience/ForWomen/FreePublications/UCM246541.pdf

FDA, http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm272905.htm

FDA, http://www.fda.gov/EmergencyPreparedness/Counterterrorism/MedicalCountermeasures/MCMIssues/ucm464122.htm

FDA, http://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/byaudience/forwomen/womenshealthtopics/ucm467701.htm?utm_campaign=%2B+Health&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=2&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_Y4J3BMiSD44Iv5Wf-OeFKCMm3G9IsHIHLfi_LU71U4gD95VBVlbkDV25j7yohcOjodImzviFnIA7LTl1-Bf1IHtUeTA&_hsmi=2#TipsForAllCaregivers

Office on Women’s Health, https://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/caregiver-stress.html

References:

Tips for Caregivers

https://livehealthyosu.com/2016/01/11/tips-for-caregivers/.

What Caregivers Need to Know

https://livesmartohio.osu.edu/family-and-relationships/holmes-86osu-edu/what-caregivers-need-to-know/

 

 

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refrigerator

Did you know that November 15th is National Clean out Your Refrigerator Day?  Seems like there is a day for almost everything anymore, but this one does come at a good time! Many of us will soon be filling our refrigerators and freezers with more food than usual as the holidays approach so it is the perfect time to take a good look inside.

The first step may be to decide what is safe to keep or what you should toss.  Here is a quiz that might help you get started.  Also, Ohio State University Extension provides information on safe refrigerator and freezer storage on Ohioline.  Many people do not realize the dangers involved in eating food that has been kept too long or stored in a refrigerator or freezer that is not kept at a safe temperature – under 40⁰ for the refrigerator and under 0⁰ for the freezer.

strawberryRemember, when in doubt, throw it out!  Never taste food that looks or smells strange. There could be bacteria that are not visible to the human eye, but they could cause food poisoning.

Once you have decided what needs to be thrown out, you can start cleaning!

Follow the steps below to thoroughly clean the refrigerator:

  • Remove everything – place perishable food in a cooler while you are working
  • Any old or spoiled food should be discarded.
  • Take out shelves, drawers, etc. and wash with hot soapy water, rinse, and dry.
  • Wipe out the inside of the refrigerator – don’t forget the door seals. Some recommend using a mixture of 2 TBS. baking soda/1 qt. hot water.
  • Replace shelves and drawers.
  • Wipe off jars and containers as you return them to the refrigerator.
  • Check the interior temperature to be sure that it is below 40⁰.
  • Dust and wipe the exterior of the refrigerator.

Now that your refrigerator is sparkling clean, make it a habit to wipe up any spills as they occur to keep it fresh and clean. This might be a good time to invest in new refrigerator and freezer thermometers. Keep it in the body of the refrigerator – not on the door.

Get into the habit of storing your food and leftovers properly. Securely wrap foods or store in airtight containers. Check expiration dates on products – remember that once you open them, the expiration date on the item is no longer effective! In that case, follow the safe food storage charts mentioned above.

Author:  Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Franklin County

Reviewed by: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Perry County

References:

http://food.unl.edu/november-food-calendar#pb_love

http://www.extension.iastate.edu/foodsavings/clean-refrigerator

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/food-poisoning/features/spring-clean-your-fridge-and-freezer#1

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marie fourth july

Fourth of July celebrations include fireworks, backyard barbecues, and maybe a trip to the beach. Whatever you have planned, enjoy the holiday and be safe.

Fireworks Safety – The safest way to enjoy fireworks is to enjoy a public display put on by professionals.  Stay at least 500 feet away from the show.  Many states outlaw fireworks.  If someone is setting off fireworks at home, they should follow these safety guidelines:

  • Never give fireworks to small children and always follow the instructions on the packaging.
  • Keep a supply of water close by.
  • Light only one firework at a time.
  • Be sure the person lighting fireworks always has eye protection on.
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place away from children and pets.
  • Never throw or point a firework toward people, animals, vehicles, structures or flammable materials.
  • Leave any area immediately where untrained amateurs are using fireworks.

Beach Safety – If visiting the ocean and swimming, be sure to know how to swim in the surf and only swim at a lifeguarded beach, within the designated swim area.

  • Keep a close eye and constant attention on children and adults while at the beach
  • Keep alert for local weather conditions. Check if flags are posted for warning signs.
  • Swim sober and always with a friend.
  • Have young children and inexperience swimmers wear a Coast Guard approved life jacket.
  • Protect your neck – don’t dive in head first. Walk carefully into open waters.

Rip Currents – Be aware of the dangers of rip currents and remember the following:

  • If someone is caught in the rip current, swim parallel to the shore until out of the current.
  • Once free, they should turn and swim toward shore.
  • If they can’t swim to shore, they should float or tread water until free of the current and then head toward shore.
  • Stay at least 100 feet away from piers and jetties. Permanent rip currents often exist near these structures.

Grilling Safety – Every season people are injured while using charcoal or gas grills.  Follow these steps to cook safely.

  • Never grill indoors – not in the house, camper, tent or enclosed areas.
  • Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use.
  • Make sure everyone, including pets stay away from the grill.
  • Keep the grill away from the house, deck, tree branches or anything that may catch fire.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.

Sun Safety – Limit exposure to direct sunlight between 10 am and 4 pm.  Wear a broad spectrum sunscreen with a protection of at least 15.

  • Reapply sunscreen often.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Wear sunglasses that will absorb 100% of UV sunlight to protect your eyes.

 

Written by: Beth Stefura, M Ed, RD, LD.  Family and Consumer and Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension,  Mahoning County

Reviewed by: Donna Green, BS, MA.  Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County

Sources: Redcross.org/news/article/safety tips

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I am the daughter of parents with Type 2 diabetes. My father passed away in 2012 due to complications with diabetes and my mother currently struggles with managing her diabetes. What does this all mean having Type 2 diabetes? It means that for my mom, her body does not make or use insulin very well. She takes pills and insulin daily to help control her blood sugar. It means she gets her A1C blood test quarterly to measure her average blood sugar over a three month period .momIt means it is important for her to eat healthy by choosing foods that are high in fiber, low in fat, sugar and salt such as fruits, vegetables, skim milk and whole grains.

Having lost a father due to complications with Diabetes, I feel strongly about educating others. I’ve had the opportunity to be part of a team of Ohio State University Extension educators and researchers who have developed a self-paced online course to help participants learn, share and chat with health professionals about managing diabetes.

dadIMG_766dad8

  • The course, Dining with Diabetes: Beyond the Kitchen focuses on carbohydrates, fats, sodium, vitamins, minerals and fiber. The easy to follow three-module course includes lessons, videos and activities to complete.

Participants can expect to learn:

  • How important blood sugar and carbohydrates are for managing diabetes.
  • How fats and sodium affect a healthy diet.
  • The role vitamins, minerals and fiber play in a healthy diet.
  • How to make healthy food choices when eating out and grocery shopping.

After completion of the course, participants receive a printable certificate. They are also automatically entered in a quarterly drawing for a $100 Amazon.com gift card.

Sign up is easy and free. Visit go.osu.edu/DWD_BTK and click “buy now.” The course will be added to cart for checkout at no cost. After completing the transaction, participant will be required to create an account with campus.extension.org to take advantage of all the materials.

For questions or assistance, contact Dan Remley at remley.4@osu.edu or Susan Zies at zies.1@osu.edu.

Writer: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Dan Remley,Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu

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