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Posts Tagged ‘Farmers Market’

hacks6

Have you heard about “life hacks”? These shortcuts or tips can help make life easier.  I started thinking about “health hacks” – things we could do to improve our health.  Many of these suggestions may be routine for you but look through them and see if you can find a new “health hack” to try.

  • Drink Water instead of a Beverage with Calories. Are you interested in seeing the savings in calories? Visit this CDC site for calorie comparisons. Water is refreshing and calorie free. If you want to jazz it up, add lemon, lime, strawberries, peaches or mint. For tasty combos, check out this blog featuring infused waters. Start slow and substitute water for a soda (diet or regular).
  • Get your Blood Pressure Checked. Uncontrolled blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease and stroke. You may have high blood pressure and not have any symptoms – so check it to see. Many pharmacies and stores have blood pressure monitors available. Get yours checked and talk to your health professional if you have any concerns about your blood pressure.
  • Find a Healthy Weight. Do you know the weight that is right for you? Click on this link to find out. Most of us know when we are a little over our best weight. Are your clothes tight or too loose? Do you want a free tool that will help you manage your weight? Check out SuperTracker – it can help you plan, analyze and track your nutrition and physical activity. You can join a challenge; receive virtual coaching, and motivation. SuperTracker is part of MyPlate which contains many resources
  • Farmers Market. Visit your local market and pick up vegetables or fruits. Not sure how to find a market near you? Visit this USDA website to find one near you. Eating locally grown food is a great way to get in vegetables and fruits. This past week I purchased two kinds of berries, summer squash, zucchini and beets. Try something new and support a farmer from your area.
  • Move More. If your health care provider could tell you one “health hack” to do, I bet it would be to increase your physical activity. Think about these benefits: weight management, blood pressure management, and blood sugar control. Need more motivation to move?
  • Let’s add these benefits of Physical Activity:
    • Reduce your risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome
    • Reduce your risk of Cardiovascular Disease
    • Reduce your risk of some Cancers
    • Strengthen your Bones and Muscles
    • Improve your Mental Health and Mood
    • Improve your ability to do Daily Activities and Prevent Falls

Do you have a favorite “Health Hack”? Share it with me through the comment section.

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Marilyn Rabe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

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Are you starting to see these markets opening up in your area?  Farmers’ markets are a great place to get locally-grown vegetables, fruits, and other foods for you and your family.

As more and more locations open each year, it is important to follow basic food safety guidelines to ensure that the fresh food you are buying is safe.  Many markets have their own food safety rules, and vendors must comply with them, as well as any applicable government regulations.  However, it is a good idea to remember to use the guidelines.

Buying and preparing produce:

  • Select produce that is not damaged, bruised, or molded
  • Make sure fresh fruits and vegetables are bagged separately from your meat, poultry, and seafood products
  • Wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap before and after handling fresh produce
  • Wash produce thoroughly under running water before eating, cutting, or cooking
  • If you plan to peel the produce, you should still wash it first
  • Refrigerate any cut or peeled produce within 2 hours of preparation

Eggs

  • Make sure that eggs are properly chilled. The FDA requires that untreated shell eggs must be stored and displayed at 45 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Before buying them, open the carton and make sure they are clean and not cracked

Meat and Poultry

  • Check to make sure the meat is kept in closed coolers or refrigerated to maintain cool temperatures
  • Keep meat and poultry separate from your other purchases so the raw juices do not come in contact with your other foods
  • Bring a cooler with ice or an insulated bag to keep your meat and poultry cool until you get home

Following these simple steps will help you keep your food and your family safe while supporting local growers in your area.

Sources:

Ohio State University Extension, http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-5353

United States Department of Agriculture, http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/basics-for-handling-food-safely/ct_index

U. S. Food and Drug Administration,

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/basics-for-handling-food-safely/ct_index

Writer: Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

 

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farmers market

So we’re in the heart of summer. What better way to spend your time than to take a trip to your local farmer’s market? As an experienced farmer’s market girl, I highly recommend buying your produce straight from the farm. Prior work experience on a farm allowed me to witness and appreciate all of the hard work and dedication that goes into producing the most delicious food. What could be better than fresh, nutritious, local fruits and vegetables?

In addition, the farmers or their staff will answer potential questions you may have. They constantly share great recommendations on how to select, store, and cook the produce they sell. The produce is truly fresh; vine or tree-ripened to give you the best tasting, highest quality, and nutrient-packed fruits and veggies you’ve ever had. You know exactly who is growing your food and where it’s coming from. This reinforces the farm to table concept – from purchasing produce where it is grown to taking it home for a delicious meal or snack.

To add to the excitement, you get to try new things that you may have never had before – and many farms display samples! Some farms may offer the ‘You-Pick’ option; this is where farmers let you pick your own fruits and veggies. For example, the farm I worked at had you-pick strawberries, raspberries, and peaches! So fun – and great to get the kids involved. Sometimes they host other fun activities and events such as hay rides and pumpkin carvings. Many farms also accept SNAP and WIC benefits. Not only are you supporting local businesses and the economy, but you’re getting the family involved in a fun, interactive and educational activity. So whether you’re a regular or a newbie, take some time this summer to search for farmer’s markets near you to enjoy the amazing, fresh foods they have to offer.
Check out some additional tips below to get started!

1. Find your local farmer’s market using the Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food Compass Map. You can simply type in your zip code and mile distance and find farmer’s markets near you! http://www.usda.gov/maps/maps/kyfcompassmap.htm
2. Explore different areas – some farms may have different foods to offer than others. This way you get a variety and have the chance to see plenty!
3. Develop a relationship with the farmer! Ask the farmer questions and make that connection. It’s always a great feeling to talk to the one who works so hard to bring you the freshest food!
4. Bring your own re-usable bag and return the containers or baskets the produce are stocked in. This cuts down on unneccesary waste and the farmers can always reuse the containers – money saver!
5. The farm season generally lasts from April until late October, early November, but many often stay open year round if they have meats, dairy, winter produce, and other home-grown items.
6. You could become a member of a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture). This benefits both you and the farmer in many ways and ensures you’re getting fresh food year-round. Visit http://www.localharvest.org/csa/ to find out more information!
7. Visit some handy resources to find out more information and tips on farmer’s markets!
a. http://www.nutrition.gov
b. http://www.usda.gov

Written by: Shannon Erskine, Dietetic Intern/Liz Smith, OSU Extension

Reviewed by: Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County

Resources:
http://www.usda.gov
http://www.nutrition.gov

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Farmer's Market

Does anything taste better than corn on the cob or a tomato fresh from the garden? Many of us don’t have the space or time to grow our own but the next best thing may be visiting your local farmer’s market.

The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Thomas J. Vilsack has proclaimed the week of August 4-10, 2013 as National Farmers Market Week. This proclamation encourages the people of the United States to visit a farmers market and to increase awareness of the many important contributions farmers make to daily life in America.

Be sure to plan ahead for your visit to your local Farmer’s Market. This is a great time to taste and explore fresh summer produce – maybe even some fruits or vegetables that are new to you! A few things to remember when visiting your Farmer’s Market:

• Take cash with you in case they don’t accept debit or credit cards.
• Bring your reusable grocery bag to reduce the environmental impact of plastic bags.
• Take a cooler with you to refrigerate produce if you won’t be going home after your market visit.
• Find out if the market is pet friendly before you take your pet with you.

Buying local is good for many reasons.
• Local foods are good for your health.
• Local foods are good for your wallet.
• Local foods are good for your community.
• Local foods are good for your taste buds.

While visiting your local market, ask the grower if they grew the produce themselves. Some markets have policies about the food being grown by the farmer while others allow vendors to purchase produce to sell.
See if the Farmer’s Market has a website or Facebook page. A visit to their website or page will tell you which vendors will be at the market. You might also want to check out what produce is in season and search for some recipes that will incorporate that produce.

To find out what is in season in Ohio, visit this website:
http://go.osu.edu/OhioProduceSeason

If you want to find a market near you, visit this USDA site to search for a nearby Farm Market: http://go.osu.edu/USDAFarmMarketSearch

This weekend at our local market, I picked up fresh peaches, sweet corn, baby cucumbers and black berries. What a great way to support your local farmers and enjoy the harvest of the summer. Go green, go local and enjoy the fresh flavors!

Local Foods

Sources:
USDA Agricultural Marketing Service retrieved from http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/farmersmarkets
Local Foods retrieved from
http://noble.osu.edu/top-stories/why-local-foods-matter
Ohio Produce in Season retrieved from
http://ourohio.org/food/whats-in-season
USDA Farm Market Search retrieved from
http://go.osu.edu/USDAFarmMarketSearch

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Marilyn Rabe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

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