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This past week it seems as though Fall has arrived in full force. The cooler temperatures, shorter days, changing leaves, and farmers working in the fields into the wee hours of the night signals Fall is here to stay. With the arrival of Fall, many think of football, pumpkins, bon fires, sweaters, as well as the upcoming holiday season. One of the most important, and often overlooked aspects of Fall, is the flu vaccine and remaining healthy throughout the holidays and into Spring.

Having worked in healthcare for over 22 years prior to joining ExteTeddy bear with tissues, thermometer, and cough medicinension, I would never think of NOT getting my flu shot. I witnessed first-hand some of the serious consequences of the flu, especially in those who are at high risk for contracting it. I consider my health to be better than average, but many of the people I interact or come into contact with may be at increased risk. The CDC considers the following groups to be at high risk for flu complications:

  • Children younger than 5, but especially younger than 2 years old;
  • People 65 and older;
  • People with asthma, heart disease, chronic lung disease, and neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions;
  • People with blood, kidney, liver, endocrine, and metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus;
  • People who have a weakened immune system due to disease or medication;
  • Pregnant women and women up to two weeks postpartum;
  • Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.

The CDC also suggests these reasons to get a flu shot:

  • Flu vaccine has been shown to reduce flu illnesses and reduce the risk of flu hospitalization, ICU admission and even death in children.
  • Flu vaccine also is an important preventive tool for people with chronic health conditions (heart disease, lung disease, diabetes).
  • In addition to helping to protect pregnant woman from flu illness and hospitalization, a flu vaccine given during pregnancy has been shown to help protect the baby from flu infection for several months after birth, before he or she is old enough to be vaccinated.
  • A 2017 study showed that flu vaccine can be life-saving in children.
  • Flu vaccination also may make your illness milder if you do get sick. (For example a 2017 study showed that flu vaccination reduced deaths, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, ICU length of stay, and overall duration of hospitalization among hospitalized flu patients.)

Most of us probably know someone who is skeptical about getting a flu shot. The CDC has listed some of the misconceptions people may have about the flu and the flu vaccine. So, if the millions of people who are hospitalized each year with complications related to the flu are not enough to convince you or those you know and love, perhaps knowing the facts about the flu and the flu shot will.

Written by: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Amy Meehan, MPH, Healthy People Program Specialist

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control (9/24/18). Vaccination Remains Your Best Flu Protection. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/features/flu/index.html

Centers for Disease Control (9/25/18). Misconceptions about Seasonal Flu and Flu Vaccines. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/misconceptions.html

Centers for Disease Control (10/2/18). Seasonal Flu Shot. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/flushot.htm

https://pixabay.com/en/allergy-cold-disease-flu-girl-18656/

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