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Man with ladder picking apples
My dad picking apples

Apple season is upon us! I grew up in a rural area in western New York where we had an old orchard of apples growing wild along the yard and woods on our property. We spent many fall days picking apples for homemade applesauce, cider, and many apple desserts. According to Agriculture Marketing Resource Center, Ohio is a top 10 producer of apples in the United States, growing around 50 varieties of apples. There are many great apple orchards throughout Ohio where you can pick your own apples, or you can stop by a farm stand or famers market to enjoy fresh, local, and delicious Ohio apples.

Apples are one of the most popular fruits in the United States. They are a great source of vitamin C, potassium, and fiber when you consume the skin. A raw medium (3 inch) apples is about 95 calories. Whether you are picking your own at a local orchard, selecting from the farmers market, or even the grocery store, here are some tips for selecting the right apple

basket of apples

Choose apples that are:

  • Firm.
  • Free of bruises, pitting, decay, or insect damage.
  • Well colored.
    •  Ground color is the color near the stem. An apple that is ripe and mature will have a more yellow tone verse a younger apple will be greener.

Apples can be sweet, tart or somewhere in between. For best results, use the variety that works best for your intended use. Here is a chart of common Ohio apples and their uses:

CortlandSlightly tart or spicy, great all-purpose apple.
FujiSweet excellent fresh or for baking.
GalaVery sweet, best fresh.
Golden DeliciousSweet, excellent fresh or for baking.
Granny SmithTart, excellent for baking.
HoneycrispSweet, excellent fresh.
McIntoshMildly tart, best fresh or for sauce.
Red DeliciousSweet, excellent fresh.

Apples can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 4-6 weeks. Storing apples in a perforated plastic bag (with small holes for venting) controls the moisture and humidity which will help maintain the quality of the apple. Wash the apple with cool running water just before eating or utilizing.

A bushel and a peck…A summary of apple measurements

  • 1 pound = 3 medium apples, which makes about 1 ½ cups of applesauce.
  • 2 pounds is about 6-8 apples, which will make a 9-inch pie.
  • 1 peck = 10 ½ pounds.
  • 1 bushel = 40 pounds which can produce about 16-19 quarts of canned or frozen applesauce.

Apples are  versatile and can be enjoyed as a stand-alone fresh piece of fruit, chopped up on salads, processed as applesauce, cider, or juice, baked in many delicious desserts, or included as part of a savory main entrée. Need inspiration? You can find apple recipes at snaped.fns.usda.gov/seasonal-produce-guide/apples

Written by: Laura Halladay, NDTR, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Greene County

Reviewed by: Laura Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Warren County

Photo Credits:

Apple basket by Larisa Koshkina accessed via Pixabay. Man picking apples by Laura Halladay

Sources:

Apples. Agricultural Marketing Resource Center. (2021, September). Retrieved August 31, 2022, from https://www.agmrc.org/commodities-products/fruits/apples

Gao, G. (2017, January 12). Growing apples in the Home Orchard. Ohioline. Retrieved August 29, 2022, from https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/hyg-1401

Roper, T. R. (2001, September). When Are Apples Ripe? Retrieved August 31, 2022, from https://polk.extension.wisc.edu/files/2014/02/When-are-Apples-Ripe-A3743-E.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Apples. SNAP Education Connection. Retrieved August 30, 2022, from https://snaped.fns.usda.gov/seasonal-produce-guide/apples

Williams, T. (2021, July 8). Selecting, storing, and serving Ohio apples. Ohioline. Retrieved August 29, 2022, from https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-5507

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I absolutely love a great road trip. There is something so precious about being in the car with family or friends with the radio blaring and the country rushing by. And yet, my good intentions for eating healthy on vacation go out the window as we stop to refill the gas tank and the candy bar displays and fast food restaurants seem to be calling out for me to eat.

There are a few tips and tricks I’ve picked up over the years taking both short and long road trips that have helped me to eat healthier on-the-go. With a little bit of preparation and intentionality, it is possible to make healthier choices than the candy bars and fast food options, just by taking a few minutes to pack a small cooler and prep items like fruits, veggies, and cheese sticks.  

MyPlate.gov reminds us to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy or fortified soy alternatives. Remember each day to make your plate colorful and choose nutrient-rich choices to make every bite count. By pulling over to the road side rest stop and having a picnic, you will also be able to stretch your legs and enjoy some fresh air.

There are many options for healthy packing. Here are a few of my family’s favorites:

  • Dairy: cheese sticks, yogurt pouches, travel-sized milk
  • Vegetables: celery sticks, carrot sticks, peppers, salsa
  • Fruits: strawberries, blueberries, grapes, pineapple cups, applesauce pouches, apples
  • Protein: sliced meats, nut butter, hummus, nuts, hard boiled eggs
  • Grains: whole wheat bread or crackers, oatmeal energy bars, air-popped popcorn, rice cakes
  • Hydration: water first for thirst

TO PREPARE FOR SUCCESS

Anything worth doing takes a little more time. This is true for healthier eating on a road trip. Usually the week before a trip is busy, busy, busy and you want to not add one more thing to your schedule.  However, everyone will have a better trip if there is a healthy snack or meal option on the road.

  • Schedule time on your calendar for buying and prepping healthy food options. Don’t forget to purchase take-along storage containers or baggies if you do not have any.
  • Look ahead to the route you will be taking and plan stops where you will be able to stretch your legs and refuel your body (and not just your vehicle). 
  • Clean the kitchen before you head to the grocery so that when you come home you can prep the food right away.  
  • Plan your trip menu using a printable template like the one below, or design one of your own. This will also help you stay within your food budget for the trip.  
  • Give everyone in the family money that they can use for “sometimes foods” when you stop to refuel.  When my kiddos were younger, giving them each $5-10 to use on the whole trip for snacks usually sent them to the cooler instead of purchasing sodas or candy bars.

Just like anything we do, being proactive and planning ahead will help your road trip be more successful and you will arrive at your destination without the bloating and sugar overload that changes in diet can cause.  Best of luck and safe travels!

Written By: Jami Dellifield, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Hardin County

Reviewed By: Jenny Lobb, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Franklin County

RESOURCES:

U.S. Department of Agriculture. What is MyPlate? https://www.myplate.gov/eat-healthy/what-is-myplate 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2021). Healthy snacks: Quick tips for parents. My Healthfinder. https://health.gov/myhealthfinder/topics/everyday-healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-snacks-quick-tips-parents

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The holiday season is here!  Holiday celebrations often center around food.  We plan to manage our healthy meal plan during the holidays and avoid weight gain yet find ourselves in the office breakroom with a tray of cookies, opening the door to your neighbors’ famous peanut butter fudge or get an invite to go out with friends.   Here are some tips to help maintain weight over the holidays:

  • Eat your fruits and vegetables.  Fill half your plate with vegetables and fruits.  They will satisfy your appetite and induce fullness.
  • Keep moving.  Manage your daily physical activity.  Be active daily!
  • Treat yourself just once a day!  Enjoy that one item daily.  Take a smaller serving.  Cut out an extra 100 calories later in the day.
  • Control the risk of temptation.  Clear your home and office of tempting holiday goodies. Share any gifts of foods.
  • Balance protein intake.  Holiday meals tend to be higher in carbohydrates and low in protein. Include protein with every meal.
  • Never go to a party hungry.  Eat a serving of fruit, yogurt, or raw nuts before you leave for the party. Don’t linger over the buffet table.
  • Get plenty of sleep.  Those who do not sleep adequately tend to be hungrier, consume more calories and exercise less. 
  • Manage stress.  Holidays are often stressful and stressed individuals have higher cortisol levels which is linked to increased hunger and weight gain.

Socialize with friends and family at holiday gatherings and limit access to buffet and dessert tables.  Choose from the crudities tray. Happy Holidays!

Written by Beth Stefura, OSU Extension Educator, Mahoning County stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:Michelle Treber, OSU Extension Educator, Pickaway County  treber.1osu.edu

References:   

Holiday Eating – Today’s Dietitian Magazine (todaysdietitian.com)

https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/1215p20.shtmlMay Your Holiday Season Be Light: How to Avoid Holiday Weight Gain (todaysdietitian.com)

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This fall has presented many challenges for my family with eating a nutritious dinner as one of them. With back-to-school, work, homework and my kids extra-curricular activities, we found ourselves hitting the drive-thru more times than not. While discussing my troubles with a co-worker, they recommended I dust off my slow cooker and put it to work. Duh! Why didn’t I think of that? I decided to take full advantage of my slow-cooker and gain back my nutrition, time, and sanity.

Collection of slow cooker recipes graphic

As humans, we want tried and true recipes that we know others enjoy. What better way to get that than to team up with your co-workers and turn it into a project! At the beginning of the month, my office teammates and I started a Facebook campaign of slow cooker recipes for the month of October. Every day we have been posting a slow cooker recipe that our families enjoy. Not only did we want to share recipes, we wanted to share educational information with them.

Prior to the recipe posts we started with some slow cooker safety tips:

1. Make sure everything is CLEAN.

2. Keep food COLD until it’s time to assemble.

3. DEFROST meat first. Never put frozen meat into your slow cooker.

4. Cut meat into SMALLER pieces.

After that information was posted on social media, I received a lot of comments related to thawing meat prior to slow cooking. You can find additional information on this topic in one of our previous blog posts: “Using Your Slow Cooker Safely”.

We’ve also been keeping all the recipes on our county website to make it easier for people to find and print them. The great thing is you will find a mixture of recipes! We have a collection of breakfast dishes, soups, drinks, desserts, appetizers, and entrees. With the month coming to an end, we are sad to see this project come to an end, but excited to start working on the next one!

Sources:

Goard, L. (2011, October 18). Using your slow cooker safely Retrieved from https://livehealthyosu.com/2011/10/18/using-your-slow-cooker-safely/

Jeffers, M.K. (2021, August 3). Cook slow to save time: four important slow cooker safety tips Retrieved from https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2017/10/24/cook-slow-save-time-four-important-slow-cooker-food-safety-tips?fbclid=IwAR31cTEAHJQ06p-sUCtrU4Ca2KkSNuPfHMBiBWTR7CqgQ_oy8oSQ_olhrlI

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

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This fall I want to encourage you to do something you may have been scolded for at the dinner table as a youth; play with your food! Don’t worry, playing with your food as an adult won’t look the same.  We can sometimes get stuck in a rut when it comes to our food choices or find ourselves on autopilot eating the same foods or using the same recipes over and over. We want to remind you; it is possible to have fun with food even as an adult!  Just adding a few new twists can have you exploring new foods and having fun. May we suggest:

Play with a Cuisine: build some play into the types of cuisines you are trying. Start with creating a list of foods you enjoy or that sound interesting to you. Do you have a curry dish that you love from a local Indian restaurant? Look up a similar recipe online and try it at home. Been wanting to try a new cuisine? Ask around or look online for a restaurant that offers what you’re wanting to try. Adding new cuisines to your food routine can be a great way to include new flavors and textures, and those are NEVER boring!

Play with a Group: Food can be fun to enjoy at parties, or with friends and family. Food is often tied to great memories, family traditions, and other meaningful experiences. Invite a new group of people to join you to play with your food by trying a new restaurant or invite them over to enjoy a meal in your space. Connecting food to meaningful experiences and making new friends is an enjoyable way to play with your food. . . and make a new connection!

Play with a Seasonal Food: Using seasonal food is a great way to save money and try foods when they are showing off at the peak of their freshness.  This list can be a great way to help you know what is in season. Try playing with fresh fruits and vegetables in your favorite season.  Wander the produce section of the grocery store and make a point of picking out something you’ve never tried.  Finding a new food you love will pay off in a fun way for a long time.

Play with a Style: There are so many ways to prepare foods. If you’ve passed on food before, consider trying it again in a new way. Not a fan of steamed squash? Try it roasted in the oven with some fresh herbs. Didn’t love a cut of meat at first taste? Try it in a soup, stew, curry, or pasta dish. You could even play with a new cooking method or technique.  

Now that you are inspired to PLAY with new foods, techniques, and cuisines, we hope you find something new that you love!!

Resources:

Healthy Cooking Techniques: Boost flavor and cut calories. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/healthy-cooking/art-20049346

Seasonal Produce Guide. https://snaped.fns.usda.gov/seasonal-produce-guide

Written by: Alisha Barton, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Miami County  barton.345@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County, carter.413@osu.edu

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pumpkin spiced drinkAre you a pumpkin spiced lover? Do you flock to the local coffee shop or bakery to pick up the latest pumpkin spiced treat? You are not alone, in 2019 the pumpkin spice market was worth over half a billion dollars in the US alone.  Some of the popular additions to the trend this year are candy, hot or cold drinks, baked goods or mixes, ice cream or cold treats, breakfast foods, and even alcoholic beverages.

True pumpkin, not just the flavoring, is packed with fiber, potassium, vitamins A and C. Just one cup of pumpkin can provide 50% of your daily recommendation for vitamin C and 450% for vitamin A in only 50 calories. The beta-carotene in pumpkin has been shown to reduce the risk of developing certain cancers and heart disease.

If you love pumpkin flavors and want to add a few pumpkin foods or treats to your diet, consider making them yourself. Not only will you save money, but you can also have better control on the calories, sodium, fat, and sugar. A typically Pumpkin Spiced Latte has anywhere from 170 to over 400 calories, but if you make this version from Iowa State University Extension and Outreach you can make a low-fat, natural sugar version for about 120 calories. The recipe even ends up being a good source of vitamin D, calcium, and potassium. Other pumpkin flavor ideas include:

  • Pumpkin Oatmeal – mix your oats with skim milk and ½ cup of pureed pumpkin. Add ½ tsp pumpkin pie spice or some cinnamon.
  • Pumpkin Smoothie – yogurt, pumpkin puree, chopped banana, ice, pumpkin pie spice, and a small amount of honey blended until smooth. Make it into a pumpkin smoothie bowl by leaving your smoothie a little thicker and sprinkling granola and a few other fruits on top.
  • Quick Pumpkin Soup – pumpkin puree, vegetable broth, skim milk, and basil, ground ginger, and garlic powder.  
  • Pumpkin Black Bean Chili – heat your pureed pumpkin, black beans, diced tomatoes, chopped veggies (onion, peppers, celery), with chicken broth and diced or canned chicken, and seasonings. Always look for the no salt added or low sodium versions of canned foods.

If you would like to pressure can your own pumpkin or winter squash my coworkers from the Ohio State University Extension Food Preservation Team recently did webinar full of tips. To access that information, go to: https://fcs.osu.edu/programs/healthy-people/food-preservation/office-hours-recordings  and click on Canning Winter Squash.

We can’t wait to hear your favorite ways to include pumpkin in your diet. Be sure to comment or share your favorite recipe or pumpkin tip.

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 18% or 13.7 million children and adolescents in the United States are obese. This means that they have a body mass index at or above the 95th percentile of the CDC growth charts. It is projected that this epidemic will affect 50-80% of children in the United States by 2030.

Childhood obesity can result from an unbalanced diet consisting of high-calorie, low nutrient food and drink choices, lack of physical activity, and a rise in sedentary, screen-focused activities such as video gaming. Many studies have shown that children with obesity are at increased risk of developing short-term weight-related health conditions, as well as chronic conditions later in life. These children have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, heart disease, and even premature death. This condition can also impact mental health in children, causing isolation stemming from bullying, depression, poor self-esteem, and a general lack of confidence.

BUT! There is good news. Obesity does not have to follow children into adulthood. Adopting positive lifestyle choices as children can help establish healthy habits and prevent the onset of these weight-related health conditions. Although genetics and metabolic rates differ from one child to another, healthy eating and living an active lifestyle can help manage their weight status, regardless of whether the child is at a normal weight, overweight, or obese.

You may be thinking this sounds great in an ideal world where kids get excited about eating their greens, and request grilled chicken instead of chicken nuggets, but that’s just not the world we live in. So how can we get our kids to eat nutrient-packed, lower calorie foods?

Use fun colors! – Instead of using traditional colored foods, here are some fun ideas to make your child’s plate more vibrant:

  • Try rainbow colored carrots instead of regular carrots.
  • Make a rainbow veggie wrap with bright colored peppers, spinach, and red cabbage.
  • You can also use red cabbage juice, blueberry juice, or other natural dyes to color cauliflower, rice, and yogurt a new color!

Use fun shapes! – Try creating fun, new shapes with ordinary foods. rocket shaped sandwich with vegetables

  • Use cookie cutters to cut fruit or veggies into interesting shapes.
  • Try using a spiralizer or a spiral veggie knife to present vegetables into noodles or zoodles.

Hide the fruits and veggies! – Disguise fruits and vegetables in your child’s favorite foods

  • Create a tasty, nutrient-rich smoothie with your child’s favorite fruits and vegetables and freeze it into ice pops for a tasty treat.
  •  Substitute traditional dishes with healthier options that appear the same. Examples include mashed cauliflower instead of mashed potatoes or spaghetti squash to replace regular pasta.
  • Add healthier substitutes in a dish that looks similar. Try adding squash to macaroni and cheese, chopped vegetables in meatballs, or making chocolate pudding with banana, avocado, cocoa powder, and vanilla!

Lastly, get your kids involved in the kitchen! Letting children help in meal preparation can motivate them to eat the dish they helped create.

  • Mother and daughter shopping for fruit.It begins at the grocery store – Consider bringing kids along and let them help you pick the produce they find most appealing.
  • Encourage your child to find a recipe they want to make, which includes a fruit or vegetable, and make it together.
  • Give your child age-appropriate tasks during meal prep such as washing the produce, mixing ingredients, and setting the table!

Check out the Ohio State University Extension Office’s Nutrition page for information about additional activities, classes, and education. Incorporating these fun, simple ideas into your child’s routine can help them develop lifelong healthy habits which prevent the onset of conditions related to obesity. Teaching our children how to practice these lifestyle changes can impact this generation, and generations to come!

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/causes.html

The Harvard Gazette: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2017/11/harvard-study-pinpoints-alarming-obesity-trends/

About the Author: Olyvia Norton is a senior student in the Nutrition and Food Science, Dietetics program at Middle Tennessee State University. Her interests are in clinical nutrition, specifically pediatric nutrition and nutrition support. She serves as the President of the Students of Tennessee Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, is an active member of the Nutrition and Dietetics Association at Middle Tennessee State University and works as a dietitian’s assistant in Middle Tennessee for patients with special needs. Olyvia also enjoys serving on medical mission teams outside of the United States to bring better nutrition to underserved populations in developing countries.

Reviewer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, barlage.7@osu.edu.

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The last couple of weeks have been spent moving from a home with 20 years accumulation of “stuff” to a new home. While it has been exciting, it has also been exhausting.  I realized a few days ago that I was staying up later than usual to unpack and rearrange items and then not falling asleep when I did go to bed. My mind kept racing thinking about everything I needed – or wanted – to do the next day. The result was a tired, somewhat grumpy version of me!

Eating well and being physically active are two basic activities that we think of when we discuss being healthy.  Something that is often overlooked is the importance that a good night’s sleep plays in our overall health. Research has shown that insufficient sleep increases the risk of disorders, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, stroke and depression. It’s also associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.

Most of us have heard that all adults need 7 – 8 hours of sleep each night. That generally holds true but it is important to remember that the quality of your sleep is just as, if not more, important than the quantity!  You should feel rested when you wake up in the morning. It is important to listen to your body’s biological clock which is set by the hours of daylight where you live. This should make it easier for you to stay awake during the day and sleep at night.

There will be times that you find it more difficult to fall asleep than others. If you are under stress, experiencing pain from an injury or illness, consuming excess caffeine or alcohol, you may find that falling and staying asleep are difficult. In that case, recognizing the reasons and making some adjustments to your daytime activities should help you sleep more soundly.

Some suggestions for improving your sleep:

  • Create a comfortable, calming sleep environment. This could include room darkening window coverings.
  • Avoid electronic devices in your bedroom – computers, tablets, games, etc. should be shut down before bedtime.
  • Establish a routine that you follow each evening to help you fall asleep and stay asleep.
  • Have a consistent bed time – even on the weekends.

There are small changes you can make to your daytime activities that may lead to better sleep.

  • Try to spend some time outdoors every day.
  • Exercise earlier in the day instead of later in the evening.
  • If you nap, limit yourself to 20 minutes or less.
  • Avoid both caffeine and alcohol close to your chosen bed time. Do some experimenting to find the cut off time for you – everyone will be a little different!
  • If you smoke, quit! Nicotine in cigarettes can make sleep more difficult.

If you continue to have sleep problems, it might be wise to visit your doctor to be sure you don’t have a more serious sleep disorder.

While sleep is not a guaranteed cure all for you, it doesn’t hurt anyone to establish sleep habits that help you consistently get a good night’s sleep!

 

WRITTEN BY: Marilyn Rabe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

REVIEWED BY: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Sources:

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2017/10/cover-sleep.aspx

https://healthfinder.gov/healthtopics/population/men/mental-health-and-relationships/get-enough-sleep#the-basics_2

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/ask-the-doctor-right-amount-of-sleep

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Do you find it challenging to eat healthy while dining out?

You might be wondering if it is possible to make healthy choices when dining away from home.

Yes, there are healthy choices if you are aware of what to look for and ask for when dining out.  Many restaurants offer meals that are low in calories, saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol. Learning and understanding what to look for, can improve the choices you make while dining away from home.  Keep portion size in mind, as most restaurants serve large portions that lead to increased amounts of saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars.

grilled-chicken-1334632_960_720

A big challenge to dining out is finding and making good choices. Often, a restaurant, dinner party, or event will not have exactly what you want. These tips will assist you in these situations:

  • Plan Ahead
  • Having a plan will help you prepare for difficult situations.  By being prepared, you are more like to make healthy choices.
  • You can call ahead to the restaurant or look at the menu on-line to see what healthy options are available.
  • Eat less fat and fewer calories at breakfast and lunch if you plan to eat out in the evening.
  • Eat a small, healthy snack or drink a large, low-calorie or calorie-free beverage before you go out so you won’t be as tempted to overindulge on less healthy food.
  • Select what you will order before you get to the restaurant, and order without looking at the menu.
  • Order Healthy
  • Choose foods that are baked, broiled, grilled, roasted, steamed, or stir-fried.
  • Select foods without gravy, sauce, butter, or ask for your food to be prepared without these extras.
  • Choose a low-calorie salad dressing and ask for it on the side so you can control how much is on your salad.
  • Keep Portion Sizes Small
  • Share your meal with someone.
  • Ask for a to-go box when your meal arrives and put a portion away for the next day.
  • Order a low calorie appetizer as your meal.
  • Load Up on Vegetables and Fruits
  • Make half your plate vegetables and fruits.
  • Steamed vegetables are always a good choice.
  •  Ask for a side salad in place of fries or chips when they come with your entrée.
  • Beware of Bread Choices
  • Choose 100% whole grain bread choices.table-791167_960_720
  • Order your sandwich without bread.
  • Pass the bread basket when it appears in front of you.

When your only choice is fast food, look on-line for specific nutrition information or use this resource for general tips when ordering from fast food chains.

If you’re dining at a buffet, keep in mind that they offer a variety of options which can lead to poor choices and overeating.  This guide gives some tips to consider before you go into a restaurant with a buffet.

Writer: Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Sources

National Diabetes Prevention Program, https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/pdf/handout_session10.pdf

National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute, https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/wecan/eat-right/distortion.htm

USDA, Choose My Plate, https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ten-tips-eating-foods-away-home

USDA Choose My Plate, https://choosemyplate-prod.azureedge.net/sites/default/files/tentips/MPMW_Tipsheet_7_navigatethebuffet_0.pdf

USF Health at the University of South Florida, Tampa,

http://health.usf.edu/NR/rdonlyres/D5168BE9-98A7-4809-97E8-3EAA23A7006A/42723/HealthierFastFoodOptions.pdf

 

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The holidays are a time for eating delicious food and spending time with friends and family. Studies show the average American gains one pound during the holiday season.  If you are on a special diet due to elevated blood pressure or high cholesterol, holiday foods can be tricky.  No one food or beverage is good or bad, but some have more health properties than others.

Review the following five holiday foods to indulge in this year (and the seven to limit consumption of) to ensure a healthy holiday season.

NICE Holiday Foods

  • Cranberry Sauce
  • Pumpkin Pie
  • Tangerines
  • Dark Chocolate
  • Nuts

Eat these lighter, nutrient rich foods more often during the holiday season. Make it a challenge to try and get the healthiest version of each dish available.

NAUGHTY Holiday Foods

  • Egg Nog
  • Pecan Pie
  • Gravy/Sauces/Dips
  • Cheese Cake
  • Fudge
  • Croissants
  • Coffee Beverages

These foods and drinks are special occasion foods to enjoy on a limited basis. Reach for these foods less often or modify the recipes to make the dishes healthier.  Choose wisely during the holidays.  Plan ahead for holiday parties, drink water prior to eating out, and eat the “naughty foods” in moderation.

Take care of yourself this holiday season, and remember that fitness, stress management and sleep also play important roles during the holidays!

Written by: Beth Stefura, RD,LD, Ohio State University, Extension Educator, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Donna Green, Ohio State University, Extension Educator, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

Resources: http://www.webmd.com/doet/healthy-holidays-8/holiday-food

Healthandwellness.vanderbilt.edu/files/hpHTSHolidayTips.pdf

 

 

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