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Posts Tagged ‘food moderation’

on a diet picture

Everywhere I turn I see a nutrition claim on food. Claims like fat free, low-carb, keto, paleo, and plant based. Social media is filled with those same claims and has groups using some of them as diets. Then add an additional layer of confusion as those groups are competing against each other on which one you should choose to get faster results. I’ve seen advertisements for diets that have you cut out carbohydrates, or another one that has you cut out all forms of sugar, some that tell you to only eat foods off their approved list, or juice all your fruits and vegetables, and one that tells you to only eat “clean” food. What does “clean” food even mean? Am I supposed to wash it with soap and disinfect with bleach first?!  All this information is completely overwhelming!

I could spend hours going over all the information trying to decipher if it’s research based or just someone sharing their opinion.  Instead of wasting time I don’t have, I decided to go straight to the source and work with a registered dietician and health coach. That was when I was introduced to intuitive eating. Intuitive eating is a philosophy that put me in charge to make my own food choices that are best for my body. Intuitive eating focuses on lifestyle changes and personal care because those are more important for long-term health instead of crash dieting.

A few good tips to get started are to:

  1. Observe food habits: pay attention to what and when you are eating without judging
  2. Reflect on reasons for eating: were you hungry or was there emotion behind your decision
  3. Try mindfulness: are you paying attention to your senses as you eat or is it mindless eating
  4. Listen to hunger cues: eat when truly hungry and without restricting food
  5. Avoid moralizing food: food is no longer labeled as good or bad
friends eating at a restaurant

As I started to incorporate some of the guidelines, I noticed that I was starting to feel better, I wasn’t as tired and had more energy. I learned to pay attention to my body and my hunger cues. I stopped restricting food and started enjoying things, within moderation, to meet my goals. I’m also working towards giving myself grace when things happen instead of self-sabotaging.

Intuitive eating isn’t right for everyone. If you are experiencing certain health conditions or allergies, please follow your doctor’s medical advice.

If you’d like to learn more about intuitive eating, I encourage you to read Intuitive Eating: A revolutionary Program That Works by Evelyn Tribole, and Elyse Resch. They also have workbooks and journals to help you along on your journey.

Sources:

Jennings, K.-A. (2019, June 25). A Quick Guide to Intuitive Eating. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/quick-guide-intuitive-eating

Sparks, A. (2021, August 23). What is intuitive eating? Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/intuitive-eating

Sreenivas, S. (2021, March 5). What is intuitive eating? Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/diet/what-is-intuitive-eating

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu

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