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Posts Tagged ‘food preservation’

zucchini.jpg

As my family gardened this week we noticed that we have an abundance of zucchini. It’s that time of year where everyone is getting more than they anticipated and they are trying to find ways to use it up, preserve it, or give it away.

When picking zucchini look for firm and wrinkle free zucchini that is about 6 to 8 inches long and 2 inches in diameter. If you are anything like me, you likely have zucchini in your garden that’s 12 inches long and 4 inches in diameter. The larger the zucchini the tougher it will be and it will also contain more seeds. These zucchini are best for baking. Scoop out the seeds and pulp, grate the zucchini and use in your favorite recipes.

Zucchini have a high water content which makes them lower in calories. They provide us with vitamin C, fiber, vitamin K, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, and potassium. This makes them a fantastic vegetable to eat. However, not all children are big vegetable eaters. If you are like me, you sneak them into things when they don’t notice. Zucchini bread is always a good option but if you have a picky eater like I do, the green flecks in the bread can quickly turn them away. Have you ever put it in your chocolate cake or finely shredded in spaghetti sauce? My kids don’t know it’s there and I get them to eat a vegetable! I count it as my mom super power! The below recipe is a great one to try from USDA’s Mixing Bowl recipe collection. You can also check out some of their other zucchini recipes.

The big zucchini that I picked from my garden will make a lot of Chocolate Squash cake. I won’t use all of my grated zucchini before it goes bad so I will be freezing my leftovers. For proper freezing procedures please check out these safe instructions by the National Center for Home Food Preservation. Make sure you blanch zucchini before freezing to ensure quality.

Eating the squash cake is not as healthy for you as eating the raw vegetable itself but we all have to start somewhere.

Aunt Barbara’s Chocolate Squash Cake

Makes: 12 Servings

Instructions

1/2 cup vegetable oil

1 package cake mix, dark chocolate

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

3 eggs

1 1/4 cups water

1 cup squash (shredded or finely chopped)

1/4 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease and flour a 10″ tube or bundt pan.
  2. In a large bowl, combine cake mix and cinnamon.
  3. Add eggs, water, and oil. Blend until combined, then beat with an electric mixer for 2 minutes on medium speed.
  4. Fold in squash. Add nuts if you like.
  5. Pour into prepared pan. Bake for 50 minutes to 1 hour, until cake springs back when lightly touched.

Other Ideas:

  • Use a greased 9×13-inch pan. Bake for 45 minutes.
  • To lighten cake, try 6 egg whites in place of whole egg.
  • Replace 1/2 cup oil with 1/2 cup applesauce.

WRITTEN BY: Amanda Bohlen, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County.

REVIEWED BY: Lisa Barlage , Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension,  Ross County.

SOURCES:

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salsa

 

Most people know that today is known as Cinco de Mayo but many aren’t aware that May is National Salsa Month.  National Salsa Month began in 1997, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Pace® salsa in recognition of the popularity and unique heritage of salsa.

In observance, you should consider trying to make your own homemade salsa.  All it takes are some fresh ingredients and some dicing!  If you don’t have all of the seasonings on hand, most grocery stores carry salsa seasoning packets in the produce section.  This could save you time and money.

Most salsas are tomato-based but there are many recipes available that use a variety of other ingredients.

  • Mangos
  • Pineapples
  • Peaches
  • Apples
  • Corn
  • Carrots

Salsa is typically eaten as a dip with tortilla chips but it can also be used to add flavor to other main dish items, such as chicken and beef.

Interested in preserving your own salsa?  You should always follow a tested home canning recipe.  Here are some resources to use:

Do not add extra ingredients to the salsa recipe prior to processing it as this can affect the acidity of the salsa which is critical to the safety of the home-canned product.  You can always add extra ingredients right before serving the salsa, if you desire.

Keep food safety in mind when storing your salsa.  Refrigeration is the key to enjoying salsa safely.  Once commercially-prepared salsa or home-canned salsa is opened, the unused portion must be refrigerated.  “Fresh” salsa must also be refrigerated.  Fresh salsa has a much shorter shelf life than the canned or jarred versions.

Whether you like to preserve your own, make fresh salsa, or pick up a jar at the grocery store, enjoy some during National Salsa Month.

Sources:

Ohio State University Extension.  http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-5339

University of Connecticut Extension.   http://4-hfans.uconn.edu/recipes/05may.php

University of Nebraska Lincoln Extension.  http://food.unl.edu/documents/May_SalsaMonth_Webletter_04_30_14.pdf

University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service.  http://www.wyomingextension.org/agpubs/pubs/B1210-4.pdf

USDA, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.  http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/usda/GUIDE03_HomeCan_rev0715.pdf

 

Writer: Tammy Jones, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County, jones.5640@osu.edu

Reviewer: Melissa Welker, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fulton County, welker.87@osu.edu

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Safe, high quality home canned foods begin with the right equipment, used properly.  Why risk losing your time and food dollar through spoilage?  Check and assemble good equipment before the season begins, then maintain it well.

Check jars and bands.  Discard chipped jars and rusted or distorted bands.

Have pressure gauges checked.  Check with your local Extension office for Food Preservation Workshop or pressure canner gauge testing dates/times.

Check seals on last summer’s produce. canned foods

Make plans to use up last summer’s produce (both frozen and canned) to make room for new products and to prevent waste of food.

Check files to make sure your food preservation information is complete and up-to-date.

HOME CANNER’S QUESTIONS

  1. I have several peanut butter, pickle and quart-sized mayonnaise jars which I would like to be able to use for canning. Is it safe to use these jars in a boiling water bath canner or a pressure canner?
  2. NO! Use only standard canning jars for home canning as these jars have been specially annealed to withstand the heat necessary in the home canning process. However, these make good refrigerator storage jars, are a perfect solution for your picnic packaging  needs, or can be recycled at your local recycling center.
  3. How long is it safe to store canned food?
  4. For optimum quality of food, plan to use home-canned food within one year. After 1 year, quality of food goes down, but is still safe as long as the seal is still intact and there is no sign of spoilage.  Whatever the age, ALWAYS boil low-acid, pressure canned food a full 10 minutes.  Twenty (20) minutes for corn, spinach and meats) to destroy any botulism toxins.  DO NOT taste prior to boiling.
  5. Which pressure canner is more accurate– the kind with a dial or the one with a weight control?
  6. Both are accurate if used and cared for according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Some people like numbers on a dial; others prefer the sight and sound (“jiggling” noise) of the weight control.
  7. Do I have to use a pressure canner to can low acid foods such as green beans, corn, potatoes, etc.?
  8. YES, YES, YES!!! Low-acid foods must be canned in a pressure canner. Whether food should be processed in a pressure canner or boiling-water canner to control botulinum bacteria depends on the acidity of the food. Acidity may be natural, as in most fruits, or added, as in pickled food. Low-acid canned foods are not acidic enough to prevent the growth of these bacteria. Acid foods contain enough acid to block their growth, or destroy them more rapidly when heated. The term “pH” is a measure of acidity; the lower its value, the more acid the food. The acidity level in foods can be increased by adding lemon juice, citric acid, or vinegar.

Low-acid foods have pH values higher than 4.6. They include red meats, seafood, poultry, milk, and all fresh vegetables except for most tomatoes.  For more information – check out the National Center for Home Food Preservation’s website at http://nchfp.uga.edu/.

Resources/References:

OSU Extension’s page on food safety:  http://fcs.osu.edu/food-safety.

National Center for Home Food Preservation – www.http://nchfp.uga.edu/.

Written by:  Cynthia R. Shuster, CFLE, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Perry County, Buckeye Hills EERA.

Reviewed by:  Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Fayette County, Miami Valley EERA.

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This time of year many home gardens are filled with those last few tomatoes, peppers, or onions. If you are looking for a quick idea try salsa to make a tasty treat that is good for you and easy to prepare. Tomatoes – the main ingredient in many salsa recipes contain:

  • only 32 calories per cup
  • lycopene, a powerful anti-oxidant with cancer preventing properties
  • potassium and Vitamin B, known for improving blood pressure and cardio-vascular disease
  • Vitamin A, known for building healthy eyes

Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Shari Gallup has created a “Garden to Plate” video series which demonstrates the ease of preparing your own salsa, rather than purchasing it. Follow this link to view “Garden to Plate – Salsa” http://youtu.be/Diu1s-jnEyo.

salsa recipe

If you want to make a canned salsa to use later in the year check out our Ohio State University Extension link to food preservation resources. We even have a video to guide you through the steps with water bath canning of salsa.    To see salsa recipes and our OSU Extension Salsa Factsheet go to http://ohioline.osu.edu/ To be creative with your salsa recipe – freeze your salsa in food safe containers for up to 12 months (home canned salsas should only follow tested recipes and food preservation methods).

Take your garden to your plate with salsa!

Writers: Lisa Barlage and Shari Gallup, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educators, barlage.7@osu.edu and gallup.1@osu.edu.

Sources:

Michigan State University Extension, http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/tomatoes_provide_many_health_benefits.

Linnette Goard, Ohio State University Extension, Associate Professor, Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection and Management, goard.1@osu.edu.

Kansas State University Extension, http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/news/sty/2007/homemade_salsa090507.htm.

Garden to Plate Series, Ohio State University Extension, Shari Gallup, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Licking County, http://licking.osu.edu/news/new-our-garden-to-plate-videos.

 

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