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Posts Tagged ‘Halloween’

Have you seen teal colored pumpkin baskets on Trick-or-Treat nights? They have a special purpose. The Teal Pumpkin Project, sponsored by Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE), is part of an awareness effort to provide non-food treats for kids with food allergies.

teal pumpkin.pngAll children should be able to experience the happy tradition of trick-or-treating on Halloween. But kids with food allergies are either left out or at-risk, since a lot of candy contains allergens. One in every 13 children have food allergies.

FARE’s Teal Pumpkin Project helps ensure all children will get some sort of treat. Last year, households from all 50 states and 14 countries participated. This is a worldwide movement to create a safer, happier Halloween for all trick-or-treaters.

 

How to participate:

  1. Provide non-food treats for trick-or-treaters.
  2. Place a teal pumpkin in front of your home to indicate to you have non-food treats available.
  3. Display a free printable sign from FARE to explain the meaning of your teal pumpkin.

Ideas for Non-Food Treats

Available at dollar stores, party supply stores, or online shops, these low-cost items can be purchased and handed out to all trick-or-treaters, or made available in a separate bowl from candy if you choose to hand out both options. Nearly all of these items can be found in a Halloween theme or festive colors.

  • Glow sticks, bracelets, or necklaces

    nonfood-treats

    Non-Food Treats

  • Pencils, pens, crayons or markers
  • Bubbles
  • Halloween erasers or pencil toppers
  • Mini Slinkies
  • Whistles, kazoos, or noisemakers
  • Bouncy balls
  • Finger puppets or novelty toys
  • Coins
  • Spider rings
  • Vampire fangs
  • Mini notepads
  • Playing cards
  • Bookmarks
  • Stickers
  • Stencils

Frequently Asked Questions about Non-Food Treats (from FARE website)

Are there any non-food treats that I should avoid?
There are a few considerations when choosing which non-food items to hand out. First, some non-food items still contain food allergens, such as some brands of moldable clay, which may contain wheat. Additionally, try to choose latex-free items, as there are children who have latex allergies.

Can I still pass out candy?
Sure – just do it safely! The point of the Teal Pumpkin Project® is to make trick-or-treating as inclusive as possible. You can keep the experience safe by keeping your food treats and non-food treats in separate bowls.

If I’m handing out candy and non-food treats, how do I determine which treat to give to each trick-or-treater?
You can either ask trick-or-treaters if they have any food allergies, or give every visitor a choice of which treat they’d like: candy or a non-food item. FARE has signs to help you, including one that says “You Pick: Candy or Prize.”

Do kids really like non-food treats?
They don’t just like them, they love them! Finding a unique treat at your house will be a fun surprise. Glow bracelets, for example, are a great option. They are inexpensive, kids can wear them throughout the night, and parents are appreciative because they help make kids more visible after nightfall. Other non-food items, such as pencils and stickers, can be used at home and at school long after candy has run out or expired.

You can join the Teal Pumpkin Project to help create a safer, happier Halloween for all kids.

“The TEAL PUMPKIN PROJECT® and the Teal Pumpkin Project® logo are registered trademarks of Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE).”

Source:

Food Allergy Research and Education: http://www.foodallergy.org/teal-pumpkin-project/about#.WAo2ZdUrKpo

Adapted by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County

Reviewed by: Joanna Fifner, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Medina County

 

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kids2 Many of us will see trick-or-treaters visiting our neighborhoods this week. When you do, consider starting a new Halloween tradition. My sister, Debbie is a great hostess for trick-or-treat night. She fixes a big pot of chili with healthy beans, lean beef and tomatoes. As the soup simmers, family members can stop in for a bowl of soup and some veggies before hitting the streets. A fun veggie tray encourages everyone to try a veggie dipped in reduced fat ranch dressing. The kids and their parents have a healthy meal to get them started on their journey. Veggie Girl

Let’s explore some Healthy Option Trick or Treat Ideas:

• Offer Halloween toys, stickers, glow sticks, pencils, or erasers.
• Offer small balls, bubbles, modeling clay, plastic spiders, bugs, skeletons or sidewalk chalk.
• Offer fruit cups, 100 % juice boxes, nuts, trail mix, graham crackers, or raisins.
• Offer small Clementines with a pumpkin face for an added surprise.

Clementine PumpkinsDid you know? A research study from Yale University found that children are just as likely to choose a small toy as candy when offered both of them. Given the choice between lollipops, fruit flavored candy, tart hard candy and stretch pumpkin men, glow in the dark insects, Halloween-themed stickers and pencils, 50% of the children chose the toys.

You may have your candy stash ready to go for this year but I challenge you to visit the store after Halloween and pick up some of the non-perishable ideas to offer next year. Oftentimes we can get post-Halloween items at 50 -90% off! Purchase these for savings next year and store them in your box with your Halloween decorations (if you have one) or in the special place that you can easily find when it is time to buy candy for next year. You may be surprised at the savings you see!

You don’t have to stop offering candy but consider adding some healthy alternatives. Did you know that the average Jack-o-Lantern Pumpkin contains 250 pieces of calories equaling about 3 pounds of sugar and 9,000 calories? Let’s make that number closer to 100 pieces of candy next year! That’s enough of a treat for anyone.

Can you start a healthy Halloween tradition?

Writer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Photo Credits: Debbie Klinger, Pat Brinkman and Michelle Treber.

Sources:

American Heart Association, (2014). How to have a heart healthy Halloween. retrieved from: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyEating/How-to-Have-a-Heart-Healthy-Halloween_UCM_317432_Article.jsp

Schwartz, M. , Chen, E., & Brownell, K. (2003). Trick, treat, or toy: children are just as likely to choose toys as candy on Halloween. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 35, 4, 207-209

Kids

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Halloween Health and Safety Tips

Autumn holidays like Halloween and Harvest Day are fun times for children of all ages. They can dress up in costumes, enjoy parties, try fall fruits and vegetables and eat yummy treats. These celebrations also provide a chance to give out healthy snacks, to be active and to focus on safety.
Check out these tips to help make the festivities fun and safe for trick-or-treaters and party guests.

Going trick-or-treating?

  • Swords, knives, and similar costume accessories should be short, soft, and flexible.
  • Avoid trick-or-treating alone. Always walk in groups or with a trusted adult.
  • Fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see you.
  • Examine all treats for choking hazards and tampering before eating them. Limit the amount of treats you eat.

 

  • Hold a flashlight while trick-or-treating to help you see and others to see you. Always WALK; don’t run from house to house.
  • Always test make-up in a small area first. Remove it before bedtime to prevent possible skin and eye irritation.
  • Look both ways before crossing the street. Use established crosswalks wherever possible.
  • Lower your risk for serious eye injury by not wearing decorative contact lenses.
    Only walk on sidewalks whenever possible, or on the far edge of the road facing traffic to stay safe.
  • Wear well-fitting masks, costumes, and shoes to avoid blocked vision, trips and falls.
  • Eat only factory-wrapped treats. Don’t eat homemade treats made by strangers.
  • Enter homes only if you’re with a trusted adult. Only visit well-lit houses; don’t stop at dark houses; and, never accept rides from strangers.
  • Never walk near lit candles or luminaries. Be sure to wear flame-resistant costumes.

Halloween

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expecting guests?

Follow these tips to help make the festivities fun and safe for everyone:
• Provide healthier treats for trick-or-treaters such as low-calorie treats and drinks. For party guests, offer a variety of fruits, vegetables, and cheeses.
• Use party games and trick-or-treat time as an opportunity for kids to get their daily dose of 60 minutes of physical activity.
• Be sure walking areas and stairs are well-lit and free of obstacles that could result in falls.
• Keep candle-lit jack o’lanterns and luminaries away from doorsteps, walkways, landings, and curtains. Place them on sturdy tables, keep them out of the reach of pets and small children, and never leave them unattended.
• Remind drivers to watch out for trick-or-treaters and to drive safely.

Written by: Polly Loy, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Belmont County.
Reviewed by: Kathy Dodrill, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Washington County
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – http://www.cdc.gov/family/halloween/

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Halloweejack o lanternn is right around the corner and can be a fun filled family time.  My sister has an open-house event, complete with healthy chili cooking in the crock-pot and the adults dress up to pass out the treats. It is fun to see the surprise on the faces of the kids when they see the adults dressed up!

Treats are part of the fun but perhaps this year you will share a non-sweet treat with those who visit your house. Kids will get plenty of candy and may welcome this change of pace. Small packages of crackers can be great for those tiny Halloween participants; even toddlers can safely enjoy a cracker snack.

Here are some other Halloween Treats you might want to try:
· Small bags of pretzels
· Small boxes of raisins or other dried fruit
· Small bag of graham crackers
· Apples
· Small containers of modeling clay
· Fall themed pens, pencils or erasers
· Stickers
· Temporary Tattoos
· Spider Rings
· 100% fruit snacks
· 100% fruit juice boxes
· Cereal bars

If you must give out candy, pass out a miniature size. Even if you pass out two, it will be a smaller amount than a full-size candy bar.
Enjoy walking around your neighborhood and visiting neighbors while participating in this fun fall event. You’ll get some physical activity which can help off-set the extra calories you may consume from snacking on sweet treats. When you get home from your Halloween adventure, laugh with your kids as you enjoy a piece of your favorite candy.

Take a few minutes to sort your bounty into piles:
Favorite Treats
Don’t Like/Throw Away Items
Non-food Treats
Food Items – good for Lunches or Snacks

Halloweeners

If you are lucky enough to get some non-food treats, such as spider rings, tattoos, pencils, or pens, place them in their own special pile. You may find that your favorite goblin enjoys those treats as much as the candy. When enjoying your treats, remember to do so in moderation. Your candy can last until the New Year and it is OK to throw some of it out!

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Pickaway County, Heart of Ohio EERA, Ohio State University Extension.

Reviewer: Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Franklin County, Heart of Ohio EERA, rabe.9@osu.edu

Source: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, “Tricks to Enjoying Halloween Treats.” Retrieved 10-21-2013 from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=6442458793.

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