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Posts Tagged ‘healthy choices’

What’s in Your Breakroom?

breakroomIs there a breakroom in your office or place of work? If so, how would you describe it? Is it warm and inviting? Large? Small? Bright? Dark? Think about the food that you see on the counter tops, if any at all. Does your breakroom support people who are striving to make healthy choices? Or, like mine, is it a place full of tempting but unhealthy food that you try to avoid?

Research suggests that taking short breaks during the work day can improve focus and increase productivity, but the breakroom may not be the best place to take a breather- depending on the foods that are available there. A breakroom full of sweet treats can quickly sabotage the best diet-related intentions. A breakroom free of unhealthy choices, on the other hand, can support physical health while also promoting socialization and collaboration amongst coworkers.

If the food environment in your breakroom is less than ideal, consider making or advocating for the following changes:

  • Make sure that drinking water and cups are freely available to all. Water may be 2015-09-24 18.41.07 (1)accessible via a water cooler, drinking fountain, or filtered pitcher that is kept in the fridge.
  • Provide access to a refrigerator and microwave so that coworkers can safely store and prepare healthy lunches from home.
  • Celebrate special occasions, such as birthdays, with fruit instead of cake.
  • Use a potluck sign-up sheet, such as those created by the Growing Healthy Kids Columbus Coalition, for office gatherings where food will be served.
  • Get rid of candy dishes. Replace with bowls of fruit, if desired.Fruit Basket
  • Create a healthy snack cabinet.
  • Establish a “no dumping” policy to discourage coworkers from bringing cakes, cookies or other desserts from home.
  • Encourage your director or CEO to sign a healthy meeting pledge to demonstrate your organization’s commitment to supporting a culture of health in the workplace.

If it seems daunting to advocate for these changes, take heart in knowing that a growing body of research supports improving the office food environment to support the health of employees. Healthy meeting resources from the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association may assist you in making these changes. Once you speak up, you may be surprised by the number of coworkers who favor such changes. A healthier workplace has benefits for all!

Written by: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

References:

American Cancer Society (2009). Meeting Well. http://www.acsworkplacesolutions.com/meetingwell.asp

American Heart Association (2015). Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage toolkit. http://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@fc/documents/downloadable/ucm_465693.pdf

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2011). Brief Diversions Vastly Improve Focus, Researchers Find. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110208131529.htm

 

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It is hard to believe that we are entering the second half of 2016. Where did the time go? Were you like most of us who set a New Year’s goal or resolution?

How are you doing with that goal? Did you achieve it and move forward with your new healthy lifestyle behaviors? Did you get sidelined by events in your life?

If this new habit is part of your routine, great! If not, is it still relevant? Do you need to revise your goal? Recently I encouraged program participants to set a SMART Goal. What is a SMART goal?

One of the best things you can do to start on your road to health is to set goals using the SMART method.  Let’s start by setting a SMART Wellness Goal. Make sure your goal contains all of these components:

S                  Specific – Walk 30 minutes

M               Measurable – 6 days each week

A                Attainable and Action-Oriented – I will walk (I have no limitations)

R                 Realistic – I already walk 15 minutes 6 days of the week

T                Time Specific – By August 15, 2016

SMART Goal: By August 15, 2016, I will walk for 30 minutes at least 6 days each week.

Another Example of a SMART Goal: By August 15, 2016, I will stretch for 10 minutes at least 5 days a week.

Take a few minutes to write down Your SMART Goal: __________________________________________________________

 

___________________________________________________________

Goal cropped 2

A great website tool to help you set nutrition and physical activity goals is SuperTracker which is available from the United States Department of Agriculture. Visit their website to get started with five simple goals. You will determine your goals and periodically receive encouragement thru your email.

Why should you consider your goals during vacation time? For many of us, vacation offers extra time to reflect on our lives and evaluate our progress. I consider my July vacation as a mid-point check-up. Are there things that I want to change to improve my health? Are there activities/projects that I want to accomplish before the year end? If so, taking a few minutes to pause and identify action steps & setting a SMART goal will help me achieve my goals.

Want a little more motivation? Check out Move it Monday for their Tip of the Week and suggestions for being more active.

Remember that even if you were derailed on your New Year’s Resolutions, it isn’t too late to start again! Write that goal and get started this vacation season!

Written by: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

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Are you planning a party this weekend for the Fourth of July?  Red, white and Blue is the theme for the weekend.  Fill the party with some healthy and tasty foods that celebrate these patriotic colors.waffle-1149934__180 (1)

Start the day with pancakes with blueberries, strawberries or cherries on top.  You may want to add a little whip cream.  Blueberries are about the only food that is blue, so you may be eating a lot of blueberries today; however they contain great nutrients including potassium, other minerals, antioxidants, fiber, and some vitamins.

For a snack, parfaits are delicious.  Layer vanilla or plain yogurt with red raspberries and blueberries and you can top with some granola.  Red grapes are delicious with yogurt, so you may want tWest Region DWD Projecto add some grapes.

For a red, white and blue salad for lunch or dinner mix together kale, spinach, or romaine with some dried cranberries, blueberries, and feta cheese.  Top with a poppy seed dressing.  Another idea is to slice some tomatoes and add a scoop of cottage cheese on top.

Some cool snacks and dessert ideas are:bowl-769148_960_720

  • Make watermelon cookies – Slice watermelon about an inch thick and use cookie cutters (star shape or other shapes) to cut shapes. Then icing with vanilla Greek yogurt.  You can add some blueberries or red, blue, and white sprinkles if you want.  Serve on a platter.
  • Make skewers of cherries, bananas and blueberries
  • Make some frozen pops layering strawberries or red raspberries, vanilla yogurt and blueberries.
  • If you have large strawberries, fill them with a small amount of whip cream and top with a blueberry.
  • Make blueberry cobbler and top with ice cream or whip cream and add some red raspberries on top.
  • Add some red raspberries and blue berries to a water pitcher and serve some fruity water. Strawberries or watermelon can also be added to water for a tasty drink.
  • If you are adventurous and want to try a unique red recipe, check out this Red Beet Humus. Serve with cucumbers and blue corn tortilla chips.
  • Check out fruits and veggies more matters for more patriotic food ideas. They have a cute American Flag veggie tray.

Enjoy the weekend and celebrate with red, white and blue.

 

Author:  Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension

Reviewer:  Cheryl Barber Spires, Program Specialist, SNAP-Ed, Ohio State University Extension

Resources:

University of Maryland Extension.  (February, 2014).  University of MD Extension Prince George’s County Newsletter.   Available at http://myemail.constantcontact.com/UME-Prince-George-s-County-Welcomes-New-Associate-Dean-.html?soid=1103622714568&aid=i1Ky-ErHreg#LETTER.BLOCK139

Fruit and Veggies More Matters.  (2016)   Feeling Patriotic. Available at http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/

Roni (2014).The Red, White and Blue Sweet Summer Salad.  Green Lite Bites.  Available at http://greenlitebites.com/2010/07/red-white-blue-sweet-summer-salad/

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I am the daughter of parents with Type 2 diabetes. My father passed away in 2012 due to complications with diabetes and my mother currently struggles with managing her diabetes. What does this all mean having Type 2 diabetes? It means that for my mom, her body does not make or use insulin very well. She takes pills and insulin daily to help control her blood sugar. It means she gets her A1C blood test quarterly to measure her average blood sugar over a three month period .momIt means it is important for her to eat healthy by choosing foods that are high in fiber, low in fat, sugar and salt such as fruits, vegetables, skim milk and whole grains.

Having lost a father due to complications with Diabetes, I feel strongly about educating others. I’ve had the opportunity to be part of a team of Ohio State University Extension educators and researchers who have developed a self-paced online course to help participants learn, share and chat with health professionals about managing diabetes.

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  • The course, Dining with Diabetes: Beyond the Kitchen focuses on carbohydrates, fats, sodium, vitamins, minerals and fiber. The easy to follow three-module course includes lessons, videos and activities to complete.

Participants can expect to learn:

  • How important blood sugar and carbohydrates are for managing diabetes.
  • How fats and sodium affect a healthy diet.
  • The role vitamins, minerals and fiber play in a healthy diet.
  • How to make healthy food choices when eating out and grocery shopping.

After completion of the course, participants receive a printable certificate. They are also automatically entered in a quarterly drawing for a $100 Amazon.com gift card.

Sign up is easy and free. Visit go.osu.edu/DWD_BTK and click “buy now.” The course will be added to cart for checkout at no cost. After completing the transaction, participant will be required to create an account with campus.extension.org to take advantage of all the materials.

For questions or assistance, contact Dan Remley at remley.4@osu.edu or Susan Zies at zies.1@osu.edu.

Writer: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Dan Remley,Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu

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June 10th is the National observance honoring Herbs and Spices. Have you been told you should reduce the sodium in your diet? If so, check out this blog for suggestions for pairing herbs and spices with common foods.

Basil Herb Bowl

Basil Herb Bowl

Are you new to growing or using herbs? Start with a plant or two (or seeds) that you plan to use and grow your herb garden from there. Basil, Oregano, Cilantro, Rosemary, Parsley, Thyme & Sage are all relatively easy to grow. You can combine several plants into one pot for your own kitchen herb pot.

Basil is a very easy and versatile herb. There are several varieties of this herb. This easy-to-grow herb makes a beautiful planter – just place several varieties in a flowerpot to make a basil herb bowl.

 Not sure which spices to use? Check out this fact sheet from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Plan to use more fresh herbs in your recipe if you are substituting for dry herbs. This Ohio State University Extension fact sheet describes common herb/food pairings. Remember to add herbs at the end of the cooking as some of the flavor is lost with excess cooking.

New to seasoning with herbs? Start small to make sure you like the flavor before adding too much.

Here are a few pairings to get you started:

Basil                    Tomatoes and tomato dishes, vinegar, rice, eggs, meats, duck, salads, &  vegetables.

Oregano              Italian tomato sauces, barbecue sauce, soups, eggs, cheese, pork, vegetables & salad dressings.

Rosemary           Chicken, lamb, pork, vegetables, chowders & cheese.

Have you always wanted to make your own pesto? Watch this short YouTube video featuring OSU Extension Educator, Shari Gallup.  You will see how easy it is to make pesto from fresh basil.

Get fancy – the easy way! Cut Basil Chiffonade and add as a garnish to pasta, pizza, or salad. This is a chopping technique in which herbs or leafy green vegetables (such as spinach and basil) are cut into long, thin strips. This is accomplished by stacking leaves, rolling them tightly, then slicing the leaves perpendicular to the roll.

IMG_5809IMG_5810photo (5)

What herbs will you plant this summer? Send a comment to me and share what you planted.

Source: [OSU Extension], Gallup, S. (2014, June 9) Simple Pesto using Herbs from the Garden [Video File]. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/p0Zc8ye7V1o

Written by: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Cheryl Barber Spires, Regional Program Specialist, SNAP-Ed,  Ohio State University Extension, barber-spires.1@osu.edu

 

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We all have calendar dates which we can identify as “A day I will always remember!”  Well, I can say “On Friday, May 13, 2016, my life changed for the better because that is the day I began to get even more sleep!”  On May 13th, I attended the Global Brain Health and Performance Summit at The Ohio State University which was sponsored by The Ohio State University Neurological Institute.  Arianna Huffington, cofounder, president and editor in chief of the Huffington Post Media Group and author of The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time was the Keynote Speaker.  Guess what I’ve been doing lately?  Getting More Sleep!

Sleep Deprivation can be associated with:

  • Injuriessleep1
  • Obesity
  • Mental illness.
  • Poor quality of life.
  • Increased healthcare costs.
  • Low work productivity.

Don’t Stay Awake, Get Help Today!

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, an estimated 70 million Americans face chronic sleep problems.  Most adults require seven to nine hours of sleep each night.  While some sleepless nights may be the result of too much caffeine or thinking about something that’s worrying you, chronic sleep deprivation is often the result of a sleep disorder.

The Sleep Disorders Center at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center specializes in the evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of sleep problem conditions which include insomnia, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome (RLS), snoring, narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder and unusual behaviors during sleep, known as parasomnias.  Remember that being involved in treatments and lifestyle adjustments will help you get the quality and restful sleep you need.

Arianna Huffington’s 12 Tips for Better Sleep!  (A Condensed Version)*

  • Keep your bedroom dark, quiet, and cool (between 60 and 67 degrees).
  • No electronic devices starting 30 minutes before bedtime.
  • Don’t charge your phone next to your bed.
  • No caffeine after 2:00 p.m.
  • Your bed is for sleep- no work.
  • No pets on the bed.
  • Take a hot bath before bed to calm your mind and body.
  • Pajamas, nightdresses, and special T-shirts send a sleep-friendly message to your body.
  • Do light stretching, deep breathing, yoga, or meditation to transition to sleep.
  • When reading in bed, make it a real book or an e-reader that does not emit blue light.
  • Ease yourself into sleep mode by drinking chamomile or lavender tea.
  • Before bed, write a list of what you are grateful for.

*For a complete version of “Arianna Huffington’s 12 Tips for Better Sleep” and “The Sleep Revolution Manifesto” go to:  ariannahuffington.com

One final thought about your Health and Sleep

In the words of Thomas Dekker, “Sleep is the golden chain that binds health and our bodies together.”

Good Night!

Written by:  Janet Wasko Myers, Extension Educator, 4-H Youth Development, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, myers.31@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County, green.1405@osu.edu

Source:

The Sleep Revolution:  Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time by Arianna Huffington, Published in the United States by Harmony Books, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House LLC, New York.

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.  Sleep Disorders.  http://wexnermedical.osu.edu/sleep-disorders

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.  Mindfulness Practices – Mindfulness practices can reduce anxiety, chronic pain, depression, insomnia and stress.  http://go.osu.edu/wexnermindful

onCampus.  February 11, 2016, 16th Annual Health and Wellness Guide, Wellness is a journey, Pages 7-18.  http://go.osu.edu/HealthWellnessGuide

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When my daughter was a toddler, she had a talking toy Bullwinkle Moose that said “walking is good for you!”  For years it was a bit of a family joke and every time we went for a walk, someone had to quote Bullwinkle.      walking_focus_destress

Now, science is firmly behind the concept that walking really is good for you!  Among others, the American Heart Association promotes the positive benefits of walking. The simple of activity of walking can:

  • Reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • Improve your blood pressure, blood sugar and blood lipids profile.
  • Maintain your body weight and lower risk of obesity.
  • Reduce your risk of osteoporosis, breast and colon cancer.
  • Reduce your risk of non-insulin dependent (type 2) diabetes.

What do you need to start walking?  Basically you just need comfortable supportive shoes and a safe place to walk.

The Mayo Clinic gives some suggestions for starting and maintaining a walking habit.

  • Set yourself up for success! Have a simple, attainable goal. Maybe the first week you plan to walk 5 minutes at lunch time.  Once that becomes a habit, gradually add time to your walk.
  • Track your progress. It can be very motivating to see how many miles you have walked in a week, month or year. You can record this in a journal, a spreadsheet or an online app.
  • Make it enjoyable. Some people like to walk alone, listening to music or just enjoying some “me” time. Others prefer to walk with a friend or two. Find out what works for you.
  • Vary your routine. Plan a couple of different routes – walk outside when possible or join others walking at the gym or local mall. If you’re walking alone, let someone know where you will be walking. Keep your cell phone in your pocket for emergency calls! If you have a light or whistle, take it with you.
  • If you miss a day or two, don’t give up! Remind yourself how good you felt when you were walking regularly and ease back into it.

While walking is a relatively low risk activity, you still want to think of preventing injuries to yourself. If you haven’t been active, start slow and gradually add to your time, distance and speed.  To avoid blisters, some studies have shown that synthetic fiber socks can be better than cotton socks which absorb moisture and increase friction. Shin splints (pain on the front of your lower leg) and knee pain can be prevented or minimized by wearing proper, supportive footwear and stretching and strengthening the supportive muscles.

Remember, every step you take helps you lead a healthier life. So, get up, lace on your walking shoes and get going!

walking shoes

Written by: Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, FCS, OSU Extension, Franklin County rabe.9@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, FCS, OSU Extension ,Pickaway County treber.1@osu.edu

Sources:

The Mayo Clinic. Walking: Trim your waistline, improve your health.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/walking/art-20046261?pg=1
The American Heart Association.  Walking, Take the first step.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/PhysicalActivity/Walking/Walking_UCM_460870_SubHomePage.jsp

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