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Posts Tagged ‘healthy eating’

From a nutritional standpoint, the term “pulse” refers to the edible seed of plants in the legume family. Examples of pulses recognized by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization include dry beans, dry broad beans, dry peas, chickpeas, cow peas, pigeon peas, lentils, Bambara beans, vetches and lupins.

Pulses are low in fat and a great source of protein and fiber. They also contain important vitamins and minerals. In fact, studies have shown that people who eat at least ½ cup of pulses every day have higher intakes of fiber, protein, calcium, potassium, folate, zinc, iron, and magnesium while having lower intakes of saturated fat.

If you have never cooked with pulses before, canned pulses are a great way to start! They are precooked and very convenient. For those who are watching their sodium intake, canned pulses can be drained and rinsed to reduce sodium that was added during the canning process. Low and no-sodium versions of canned pulses are often available, too. Canned pulses are great for tossing on salads and mixing with other proteins or grains for a complete meal.

There are usually more options available in the dried pulse section of the grocery store, but since they are not precooked they require some advanced planning. If you’re buying dried pulses, look for batches that are uniform in color, size and shape, and that have smooth and unblemished seed coats. Generally dried pulses need to be soaked for 8-10 hours prior to cooking. Package instructions often include “quick” soak methods as well. When you are cooking with dried pulses, add salt and acids, such as tomatoes and vinegar, after the pulses have already softened. Acid and salt both cause the seed coat to harden and slow down the cooking process.

While pulses offer an inexpensive protein source, it is important to note that they are considered an incomplete protein, meaning they lack at least one essential amino acid. All proteins are created from variations of twenty different amino acid building blocks. Some of these amino acids cannot be produced by the human body and must be supplied to us from our food; these are called essential amino acids. It is recommended to eat pulses in combination with grains and other protein sources to make sure the body receives all of the essential amino acids necessary for good health.

World Pulse Day is coming up on February 10, 2023. Get a head start with your celebration by trying out these great recipes!

Writer: Christine Kendle, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Tuscarawas County, kendle.4@osu.edu

Reviewer: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County, carter.413@osu.edu

References:

American Pulse Association. About Pulses. https://www.usapulses.org/. Accessed January 12, 2023.

Global Pulse Confederation. What are Pulses? https://pulses.org/what-are-pulses. Accessed January 12, 2023.

United Nations. World Pulse Day. https://www.un.org/en/observances/world-pulses-day. Accessed January 12, 2023.

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People of various ages baking

The holiday season is referred to as “the most wonderful time of the year” in a popular holiday song. While it can be a time of joy, gathering, cheer, and giving, it is also a time when many of us eat more, especially sweets. These treats may partially explain why we enjoy this time of year so much. We not only enjoy eating them, but making tasty treats with friends or family likely brings happiness and fond memories. While having sweet treats every now and then can be part of an overall balanced diet, eating too many sweets or eating them too often can derail a healthy eating plan and lifestyle.

A couple months ago I had my yearly health screening for our insurance. For the past few years my hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) has been climbing. This year it was 5.9 which puts me in the prediabetes category. Now, you might wonder, how can someone whose job it is to help others lead a healthy lifestyle have numbers that are high? Well, many factors can lead to elevated glucose (blood sugar) levels which cause HbA1C to be elevated. Some of these include:

  • Family history
  • Lifestyle factors including obesity/overweight and lack of physical activity
  • Insulin resistance
  • Gene mutations
  • Hormonal diseases
  • Damage to or removal of the pancreas
  • Certain medicines

My father has and most of my uncles had type II diabetes, as well as a few other family members. Additionally, I have not been nearly as active the past couple years as I have been previously, especially when it comes to resistance exercises. Nor am I getting any younger. In addition, while it’s not necessarily a risk factor, stress can impact the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar, and I have definitely had more stress the past year or so. With my youngest child graduating and heading off to college and now my husband and I building a new house, my stress level has been higher than usual. My daughter has adjusted well and is doing fantastic, despite a hard course load, so that has helped me to adjust better to the empty house. I have also been trying to exercise more, though I still need to get back to doing resistance exercises.

Dog licking his snout with dog bisquits on table in front of him

In addition to striving to be more active again, I have been watching the amount of carbohydrates, especially added sugar, in my diet. As I have reduced the amount of carbs, especially processed ones, I notice I don’t crave them as often and smaller servings satisfy. I do not have any symptoms of diabetes or prediabetes, and I am encouraged and motivated to be more proactive to keep it that way.

As we celebrate the holiday season, focusing on gratitude now and all throughout the year may help reduce how much we eat. I do intend to have some of the tasty treats that help make this time of year special, and I will plan my eating based on how I can indulge in treats while still keeping my ultimate goal of a healthy lifestyle a priority.

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022, September 30). All about your A1C. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved December 12, 2022, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/managing/managing-blood-sugar/a1c.html

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.). Diabetes Diet, eating, & physical activity. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved December 12, 2022, from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/diet-eating-physical-activity

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.). Insulin Resistance & Prediabetes. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved December 13, 2022, from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes/prediabetes-insulin-resistance

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.). Symptoms & causes of diabetes. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved December 12, 2022, from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/symptoms-causes

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.). Your game plan to prevent type 2 diabetes. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved December 13, 2022, from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/preventing-type-2-diabetes/game-plan

Written by Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Perry County

Reviewed by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Franklin County

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Woman cooking with a skillet, surrounded by thought bubbles including the phrases "Small bites", "Slow down:", "Remove distractions" and "Use your senses".

What exactly is mindfulness? The definition would include a description of being conscious and aware or fully aware of yourself in the present moment. Therefore, mindfulness can also be incorporated into mealtimes. As the holiday season has commenced and festivities surrounding food are plentiful, practicing mindful eating can help you get through the feasts, focusing more on how you feel rather than what you are eating.

Unlike typical diets, mindful eating focuses on the sensual awareness and experience of food rather than restricting or removing it. Practicing mindful eating is about becoming more aware of your eating habits and listening to signals the body provides, such as feelings of hunger, fullness, and satiety. When practicing, you consciously choose to be fully present with your meal—paying attention to the process of eating and how you feel in response, without judgment. Eating should be a pleasant experience, and meals should be enjoyed, especially during the holidays. Mindful eating encourages you to be fully engaged during mealtime, allowing the moment and food consumed to be savored and reducing the negative feelings associated with restricting or overeating.

While the chaotic holiday season can frequently lead to binge eating, overeating, and stress eating. However, if you allow yourself to be fully present at mealtimes, you will be more likely to appreciate the food on your plate, take more time to eat, and be more in tune with the body signaling its satiety. If you are interested in the practice, consider the following techniques gathered from research on mindful eating:

  • Eat slower – take more time to chew and take breaks between bites to evaluate your feelings and thoughts on the meal.
  • Eat away from distractions such as the television or other electronics – distractions can cause mindless eating. Removing them can aid in determining triggers and allow for reflection.
  • Become aware of your body’s hunger cues and let those guide your choices on when to begin and stop eating – our brains may not signal fullness for up to 20 minutes, so take time to determine your level of satisfaction before going back for seconds or dessert.
  • Use all your senses when eating – focus on the appearance, smell, and flavors of all foods you eat to appreciate the nourishment you are providing your body.

Besides promoting better enjoyment and appreciation for food, mindful eating has been proven to aid in weight management and provide various health benefits. Studies have also suggested positive outcomes for those with chronic disease and eating disorders, but practicing mindfulness is advantageous for everyone!

Trying anything new for the first time can be difficult. Mindful eating is a practice that requires patience and continuous training to develop, but there are resources available to help you progress. While beginning your practice of mindful eating to prepare for seasonal gatherings is an ideal starting point, you will likely develop long-lasting skills and habits that will benefit you long after the hectic holiday season ends.

Sources:

Cleveland Clinic. (2022). What is Mindful Eating? https://health.clevelandclinic.org/mindful-eating/

Mathieu, J. (2009). What Should You Know about Mindful and Intuitive Eating? Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. https://www.jandonline.org/article/S0002-8223(09)01699-X/fulltext

Nelson J. B. (2017). Mindful Eating: The Art of Presence While You Eat. Diabetes spectrum: a publication of the American Diabetes Association. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5556586/#:~:text=Mindful%20eating%20(i.e.%2C%20paying%20attention,carbohydrates%2C%20fat%2C%20or%20protein.

Written by Kylee Tiziani, Bluffton University dietetic intern, with edits by Jennifer Little, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Hancock County

Reviewed by Susan Zies, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Wood County

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Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States, yet about 40% of cancers are preventable. Earlier this year, President Biden named April National Cancer Control month. Prior to the release of his proclamation, the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) had named February Cancer Prevention month. Regardless of the month, it is never a bad time to focus on cancer prevention! If you visit the AICR website, you can take an online pledge to learn about and lower your risk of cancer. The AICR recommends these healthy lifestyle behaviors to prevent cancer and promote overall health:

dumbbells and gym shoes
  1. Be a healthy weight.
  2. Be physically active.
  3. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and beans.
  4. Limit consumption of “fast foods” and other processed foods that are high in fat, starches, or sugars.
  5. Limit consumption of red and processed meat.
  6. Limit consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks.
  7. Limit alcohol consumption.
  8. Do not use supplements for cancer prevention.
  9. Do not smoke and avoid exposure to tobacco.
  10. Avoid excess sun exposure.
  11. For mothers: breastfeed, if you can.
  12. After a cancer diagnosis: continue to follow these recommendations, if you can.
a bowl of fresh fruit

In addition to preventing cancer, following these recommendations is likely to reduce intakes of salt, saturated fats, and trans fats. Together, all of these healthy lifestyle behaviors will also help prevent chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes. 

Not sure where to start? The AICR has an online, interactive cancer health check tool where you can identify what you are already doing to prevent cancer and what you could improve.

If you want to participate in a structured program to establish better eating and exercise habits to prevent cancer, the Healthy10 challenge is a 10-week program to help you put the AICR healthy lifestyle behaviors into practice.

a doctor holding a clipboard

In addition to healthy lifestyle behaviors, it is important to have recommended cancer screenings. When cancer does happen, early detection through effective screening can reduce the chance of significant harm or death. Be sure to talk with your doctor about recommended cancer screenings.

Written by Heather Hadam, Dietetic Intern, The Ohio State University and Jenny Lobb, MPH, RDN, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Franklin County.

Reviewed by Laura Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Warren County.

Sources:

American Institute for Cancer Research. https://www.aicr.org/cancer-prevention/cancer-prevention-campaign

National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health (2022). Screening Tests. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/screening/screening-tests

The White House (2022). A Proclamation on National Cancer Control Month, 2022. https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2022/03/31/national-cancer-control-month-2022

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Back to school season is the perfect time to up your game with the goal of having zero or reduced waste lunches. By planning, your family can greatly reduce the amount of food waste created. Here are a few tips from the Ohio State University Extension Sustainability Team:

  • Purchase glass, stainless steel, or food safe bamboo containers for your sandwiches or leftovers. There are a lot of stainless-steel bento style boxes available right now. Avoid using plastic bags or wrap, and aluminum foil.
  • Purchase reusable storage bags, straws, utensils, and cloth napkins that you wash and use over and over. If you use paper napkins, purchase 100% recycled paper napkins.
  • Make sure you use the oldest food in your cupboard, pantry, refrigerator first – as something gets older you may be able to freeze it for later use if you are watching (for example, you can freeze yogurt and fresh fruit for smoothies).
  • Bring your own condiments in small containers – rather than using or purchasing salad dressings or ketchup in single use packaging.
  • Compost your fruit or vegetable scraps. If composting isn’t available at your work or school, consider implementing a program.
  • Recycle what you can and keep up to date on the recycling program available in your community.
  • If you eat out, plan to take part of your meal home for lunch the next day. Eat at restaurants that use brown, eco-friendly to go containers, or better yet, bring your own.
  • The lunch bag options are limitless, so choose one that is easy to care for and fits your personality. Do you like Star Wars, Disney, the NFL, or our beloved Buckeyes? There are handy choices available for the whole family.

You may say that some of these sustainable products are a little pricey, so watch for back-to-school sales or buy these items as gifts for family members and friends gifts. I have been buying my friends glass or bamboo lunch containers the last few years and my daughter bought almost everyone in the family cool decorative mini-coolers last year for the holidays. The coolers work great for lunches or trips. We can’t wait to hear your favorite sustainable practices or lunch packing products.

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Laura Stanton, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Warren County.

Sources:

Ohio State University Extension, Sustainability Team – https://fcs.osu.edu/programs/resources/sustainability

Stanton, L.M. (2021). Ten Tips for Packing Waste-Free Lunches, Ohio State University Extension. https://go.osu.edu/waste-free-lunches

United States, Environmental Protection Agency, https://www.epa.gov/recycle/reduce-reuse-recycle-resources-students-and-educators.

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According to a 2018 Nielsen report, 39% of Americans are shifting toward eating more plant-based foods – for various reasons and to varying degrees. Some potential draws of a plant-based diet include health benefits, food safety, cost savings, ethics, and sustainability. As depicted in the graphic below from Illinois Extension, plant-based eating can range from a diet that proportionally includes more foods from plant-based sources to a vegetarian, plant-based diet that excludes animal flesh foods to a vegan diet that includes no animal foods or products.

Infographic from Illinois Extension on plant-based diets. Plant based includes more foods from plant sources: vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Flexitarian is plant-based and occasionally includes eggs, dairy and meat. Vegetarian is plant based and excludes animal flesh foods. Lacto-ovo is vegetarian but includes dairy and eggs. Pescatarian is vegetarian but includes seafood. Vegan is no animal foods. Vitamin B12 needs to be included in the diet.

The plant-based foods industry is responding to this increased demand. The Plant-Based Foods Association, a trade association representing the plant-based foods industry, states that they are working with brands, retailers, distributors, and food service providers to  “build a sustainable infrastructure for this growing demand”. Over the past couple of years, more and more plant-based foods have appeared in the grocery store. For example, “meatless grind”, a product resembling ground beef that can be used in place of ground meat in recipes for hamburgers, tacos, meatloaves, and more is now available from certain brands, and store brands are selling their own versions as well.

While you can certainly make a veggie burger from meatless grind or purchase pre-made veggie burgers in the freezer aisle of your grocery store, there are lots of easy, tasty recipes for homemade veggie burgers available online. These recipes typically include a combination of beans and grains. Here are three options:

  1. Lentil burgers containing shredded carrot and breadcrumbs
  2. Black bean burgers made with brown rice, sweet potato, and breadcrumbs
  3. Chickpea (garbanzo bean) burgers made with green onion, carrot, and flour
a veggie burger

If you have a bit more time and are willing to invest some effort in the creation of your own delicious veggie burgers, homemade beet burgers made with roasted, grated beets, black beans, brown rice, and oats are a central Ohio favorite.

Do you have a favorite veggie burger recipe? If so, please share in the comment box below!

Sources:

Illinois Extension (2020). What’s the best diet? Plant-based eating trend growing. https://extension.illinois.edu/news-releases/whats-best-diet-plant-based-eating-trend-growing

Nielsen IQ (2018). Plant-based food options are sprouting growth for retailers. https://nielseniq.com/global/en/insights/analysis/2018/plant-based-food-options-are-sprouting-growth-for-retailers/

Written by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Reviewed by Patrice Powers-Barker, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Lucas County

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on a diet picture

Everywhere I turn I see a nutrition claim on food. Claims like fat free, low-carb, keto, paleo, and plant based. Social media is filled with those same claims and has groups using some of them as diets. Then add an additional layer of confusion as those groups are competing against each other on which one you should choose to get faster results. I’ve seen advertisements for diets that have you cut out carbohydrates, or another one that has you cut out all forms of sugar, some that tell you to only eat foods off their approved list, or juice all your fruits and vegetables, and one that tells you to only eat “clean” food. What does “clean” food even mean? Am I supposed to wash it with soap and disinfect with bleach first?!  All this information is completely overwhelming!

I could spend hours going over all the information trying to decipher if it’s research based or just someone sharing their opinion.  Instead of wasting time I don’t have, I decided to go straight to the source and work with a registered dietician and health coach. That was when I was introduced to intuitive eating. Intuitive eating is a philosophy that put me in charge to make my own food choices that are best for my body. Intuitive eating focuses on lifestyle changes and personal care because those are more important for long-term health instead of crash dieting.

A few good tips to get started are to:

  1. Observe food habits: pay attention to what and when you are eating without judging
  2. Reflect on reasons for eating: were you hungry or was there emotion behind your decision
  3. Try mindfulness: are you paying attention to your senses as you eat or is it mindless eating
  4. Listen to hunger cues: eat when truly hungry and without restricting food
  5. Avoid moralizing food: food is no longer labeled as good or bad
friends eating at a restaurant

As I started to incorporate some of the guidelines, I noticed that I was starting to feel better, I wasn’t as tired and had more energy. I learned to pay attention to my body and my hunger cues. I stopped restricting food and started enjoying things, within moderation, to meet my goals. I’m also working towards giving myself grace when things happen instead of self-sabotaging.

Intuitive eating isn’t right for everyone. If you are experiencing certain health conditions or allergies, please follow your doctor’s medical advice.

If you’d like to learn more about intuitive eating, I encourage you to read Intuitive Eating: A revolutionary Program That Works by Evelyn Tribole, and Elyse Resch. They also have workbooks and journals to help you along on your journey.

Sources:

Jennings, K.-A. (2019, June 25). A Quick Guide to Intuitive Eating. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/quick-guide-intuitive-eating

Sparks, A. (2021, August 23). What is intuitive eating? Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/intuitive-eating

Sreenivas, S. (2021, March 5). What is intuitive eating? Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/diet/what-is-intuitive-eating

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu

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I absolutely love a great road trip. There is something so precious about being in the car with family or friends with the radio blaring and the country rushing by. And yet, my good intentions for eating healthy on vacation go out the window as we stop to refill the gas tank and the candy bar displays and fast food restaurants seem to be calling out for me to eat.

There are a few tips and tricks I’ve picked up over the years taking both short and long road trips that have helped me to eat healthier on-the-go. With a little bit of preparation and intentionality, it is possible to make healthier choices than the candy bars and fast food options, just by taking a few minutes to pack a small cooler and prep items like fruits, veggies, and cheese sticks.  

MyPlate.gov reminds us to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy or fortified soy alternatives. Remember each day to make your plate colorful and choose nutrient-rich choices to make every bite count. By pulling over to the road side rest stop and having a picnic, you will also be able to stretch your legs and enjoy some fresh air.

There are many options for healthy packing. Here are a few of my family’s favorites:

  • Dairy: cheese sticks, yogurt pouches, travel-sized milk
  • Vegetables: celery sticks, carrot sticks, peppers, salsa
  • Fruits: strawberries, blueberries, grapes, pineapple cups, applesauce pouches, apples
  • Protein: sliced meats, nut butter, hummus, nuts, hard boiled eggs
  • Grains: whole wheat bread or crackers, oatmeal energy bars, air-popped popcorn, rice cakes
  • Hydration: water first for thirst

TO PREPARE FOR SUCCESS

Anything worth doing takes a little more time. This is true for healthier eating on a road trip. Usually the week before a trip is busy, busy, busy and you want to not add one more thing to your schedule.  However, everyone will have a better trip if there is a healthy snack or meal option on the road.

  • Schedule time on your calendar for buying and prepping healthy food options. Don’t forget to purchase take-along storage containers or baggies if you do not have any.
  • Look ahead to the route you will be taking and plan stops where you will be able to stretch your legs and refuel your body (and not just your vehicle). 
  • Clean the kitchen before you head to the grocery so that when you come home you can prep the food right away.  
  • Plan your trip menu using a printable template like the one below, or design one of your own. This will also help you stay within your food budget for the trip.  
  • Give everyone in the family money that they can use for “sometimes foods” when you stop to refuel.  When my kiddos were younger, giving them each $5-10 to use on the whole trip for snacks usually sent them to the cooler instead of purchasing sodas or candy bars.

Just like anything we do, being proactive and planning ahead will help your road trip be more successful and you will arrive at your destination without the bloating and sugar overload that changes in diet can cause.  Best of luck and safe travels!

Written By: Jami Dellifield, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Hardin County

Reviewed By: Jenny Lobb, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Franklin County

RESOURCES:

U.S. Department of Agriculture. What is MyPlate? https://www.myplate.gov/eat-healthy/what-is-myplate 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2021). Healthy snacks: Quick tips for parents. My Healthfinder. https://health.gov/myhealthfinder/topics/everyday-healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-snacks-quick-tips-parents

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Meat substitutes, such as tofu or soy protein, have existed since the 1960s and often resemble the meat they are replacing. However, plant-based meat alternatives have become more common on your grocery store shelves and often do not resemble meat. As they are more widely available, you might be curious about adding them to your menu rotation. Here are a few suggestions for trying a meat substitute:

Consider making your own. Often these plant-based “meats” are made of familiar ingredients such as cauliflower, beans, mushrooms, or tofu. You can make your dishes meatless by substituting things like chicken for chickpeas. Or you can try making your meatless burger by combining vegetables you enjoy with black beans and rice.  This lentil burger from Celebrate Your Plate is easy and full of simple ingredients.

Read the labels on meatless products carefully. Meatless products are often higher in fiber, calcium, and iron compared to traditional meat. Some of these products may also be hiding more sodium than regular meat. Also, some meat alternatives are prepared with coconut oil, which is higher in saturated fat. When looking at the label you will need to consider your personal health goals. Whatever your nutritional goal maybe, be an informed consumer and check the label.

Trying a variety of brands and products may help you find a meat substitute you enjoy. Brands will have different tastes and textures.

Don’t forget other meatless options. Foods such as eggs, lentils, beans, tofu, nut butters, cottage cheese, edamame, noodles made from legume flour, and some mushrooms can also be a good substitute in dishes for meat.

Start with recipes you like and consider small swaps. Try lentils instead of meat in your favorite chili.  A meatless crumble that resembles the look and feel of ground beef could be used in a taco recipe. Trying a new substitute for a familiar food may help make the transition to meatless alternatives easier.

Written by: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Miami County. Barton.345@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Amanda Bennett, Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Ohio State University Miami County. Bennet.709@osu.edu

Sources:

Curtain, F., & Amp; Grafenauer, S. (2019, October 30). Plant-based meat substitutes in the Flexitarian age: An audit of products on supermarket shelves. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved April 27, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6893642/

Is meatless meat worth a try?  (2022). Strive, Spring 2022, 4.

Lentil burgers. Celebrate your plate.  Retrieved April 27, 2022, from https://celebrateyourplate.org/recipes/lentil-burgers

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MyPlate icon

Are you looking for easy, budget-friendly meal ideas? Check out the Shop Simple with MyPlate App! As you explore the App – which can be done from a phone, tablet or computer – you have the opportunity to discover budget-friendly recipes, farmer’s markets in your area, local savings opportunities, and specific information on different food items.

Want to find different ways to save money while eating healthily? This App has you covered! When browsing recipes in the App, the cost per serving is displayed, and recipes can be sorted by total cost on a scale from 1-4 in dollar signs. In the savings tab, you will find tips on how to make meal plans, shop smart, understand price tags to get more bang for your buck, and prepare healthy meals with the low-cost ingredients you find from the different MyPlate food groups.

National Nutrition Month 2022 graphic. Celebrate a World of Flavors.

This year, try using the App to find and create a new recipe for National Nutrition Month. The theme of this year’s National Nutrition Month is Celebrate a World of Flavors, so it’s a perfect time to try new flavors from around the world that honor different cultural foods and traditions. The App provides many different cultural recipes including Caribbean Casserole, Chicken Mole, Eggs Foo Young, Simple Mexican Salad and Spicy Southern Barbeque Chicken, just to name a few!

If you’re ready to take things a step further, check out the Start Simple with MyPlate App to set personalized healthy eating goals and track your progress and achievements. Although this App is designed for Smart phones, anyone can take the MyPlate quiz available online to set healthy eating goals and find resources to achieve those goals. With all these helpful tools available from MyPlate, you can be on your way to “making every bite count” in no time!     

Sources:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (2022). National Nutrition Month. https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month

USDA MyPlate. Shop Simple with MyPlate. https://www.myplate.gov/app/shopsimple

USDA MyPlate. Start Simple with MyPlate App. https://www.myplate.gov/resources/tools/startsimple-myplate-app

Written by Lillian Miller, Dietetics Student, Middle Tennessee State University and Jenny Lobb, MPH, RDN, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

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