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Posts Tagged ‘healthy eating’

Back to school season is the perfect time to up your game with the goal of having zero or reduced waste lunches. By planning, your family can greatly reduce the amount of food waste created. Here are a few tips from the Ohio State University Extension Sustainability Team:

  • Purchase glass, stainless steel, or food safe bamboo containers for your sandwiches or leftovers. There are a lot of stainless-steel bento style boxes available right now. Avoid using plastic bags or wrap, and aluminum foil.
  • Purchase reusable storage bags, straws, utensils, and cloth napkins that you wash and use over and over. If you use paper napkins, purchase 100% recycled paper napkins.
  • Make sure you use the oldest food in your cupboard, pantry, refrigerator first – as something gets older you may be able to freeze it for later use if you are watching (for example, you can freeze yogurt and fresh fruit for smoothies).
  • Bring your own condiments in small containers – rather than using or purchasing salad dressings or ketchup in single use packaging.
  • Compost your fruit or vegetable scraps. If composting isn’t available at your work or school, consider implementing a program.
  • Recycle what you can and keep up to date on the recycling program available in your community.
  • If you eat out, plan to take part of your meal home for lunch the next day. Eat at restaurants that use brown, eco-friendly to go containers, or better yet, bring your own.
  • The lunch bag options are limitless, so choose one that is easy to care for and fits your personality. Do you like Star Wars, Disney, the NFL, or our beloved Buckeyes? There are handy choices available for the whole family.

You may say that some of these sustainable products are a little pricey, so watch for back-to-school sales or buy these items as gifts for family members and friends gifts. I have been buying my friends glass or bamboo lunch containers the last few years and my daughter bought almost everyone in the family cool decorative mini-coolers last year for the holidays. The coolers work great for lunches or trips. We can’t wait to hear your favorite sustainable practices or lunch packing products.

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Laura Stanton, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Warren County.

Sources:

Ohio State University Extension, Sustainability Team – https://fcs.osu.edu/programs/resources/sustainability

Stanton, L.M. (2021). Ten Tips for Packing Waste-Free Lunches, Ohio State University Extension. https://go.osu.edu/waste-free-lunches

United States, Environmental Protection Agency, https://www.epa.gov/recycle/reduce-reuse-recycle-resources-students-and-educators.

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According to a 2018 Nielsen report, 39% of Americans are shifting toward eating more plant-based foods – for various reasons and to varying degrees. Some potential draws of a plant-based diet include health benefits, food safety, cost savings, ethics, and sustainability. As depicted in the graphic below from Illinois Extension, plant-based eating can range from a diet that proportionally includes more foods from plant-based sources to a vegetarian, plant-based diet that excludes animal flesh foods to a vegan diet that includes no animal foods or products.

Infographic from Illinois Extension on plant-based diets. Plant based includes more foods from plant sources: vegetables, fruits, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Flexitarian is plant-based and occasionally includes eggs, dairy and meat. Vegetarian is plant based and excludes animal flesh foods. Lacto-ovo is vegetarian but includes dairy and eggs. Pescatarian is vegetarian but includes seafood. Vegan is no animal foods. Vitamin B12 needs to be included in the diet.

The plant-based foods industry is responding to this increased demand. The Plant-Based Foods Association, a trade association representing the plant-based foods industry, states that they are working with brands, retailers, distributors, and food service providers to  “build a sustainable infrastructure for this growing demand”. Over the past couple of years, more and more plant-based foods have appeared in the grocery store. For example, “meatless grind”, a product resembling ground beef that can be used in place of ground meat in recipes for hamburgers, tacos, meatloaves, and more is now available from certain brands, and store brands are selling their own versions as well.

While you can certainly make a veggie burger from meatless grind or purchase pre-made veggie burgers in the freezer aisle of your grocery store, there are lots of easy, tasty recipes for homemade veggie burgers available online. These recipes typically include a combination of beans and grains. Here are three options:

  1. Lentil burgers containing shredded carrot and breadcrumbs
  2. Black bean burgers made with brown rice, sweet potato, and breadcrumbs
  3. Chickpea (garbanzo bean) burgers made with green onion, carrot, and flour
a veggie burger

If you have a bit more time and are willing to invest some effort in the creation of your own delicious veggie burgers, homemade beet burgers made with roasted, grated beets, black beans, brown rice, and oats are a central Ohio favorite.

Do you have a favorite veggie burger recipe? If so, please share in the comment box below!

Sources:

Illinois Extension (2020). What’s the best diet? Plant-based eating trend growing. https://extension.illinois.edu/news-releases/whats-best-diet-plant-based-eating-trend-growing

Nielsen IQ (2018). Plant-based food options are sprouting growth for retailers. https://nielseniq.com/global/en/insights/analysis/2018/plant-based-food-options-are-sprouting-growth-for-retailers/

Written by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Reviewed by Patrice Powers-Barker, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Lucas County

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on a diet picture

Everywhere I turn I see a nutrition claim on food. Claims like fat free, low-carb, keto, paleo, and plant based. Social media is filled with those same claims and has groups using some of them as diets. Then add an additional layer of confusion as those groups are competing against each other on which one you should choose to get faster results. I’ve seen advertisements for diets that have you cut out carbohydrates, or another one that has you cut out all forms of sugar, some that tell you to only eat foods off their approved list, or juice all your fruits and vegetables, and one that tells you to only eat “clean” food. What does “clean” food even mean? Am I supposed to wash it with soap and disinfect with bleach first?!  All this information is completely overwhelming!

I could spend hours going over all the information trying to decipher if it’s research based or just someone sharing their opinion.  Instead of wasting time I don’t have, I decided to go straight to the source and work with a registered dietician and health coach. That was when I was introduced to intuitive eating. Intuitive eating is a philosophy that put me in charge to make my own food choices that are best for my body. Intuitive eating focuses on lifestyle changes and personal care because those are more important for long-term health instead of crash dieting.

A few good tips to get started are to:

  1. Observe food habits: pay attention to what and when you are eating without judging
  2. Reflect on reasons for eating: were you hungry or was there emotion behind your decision
  3. Try mindfulness: are you paying attention to your senses as you eat or is it mindless eating
  4. Listen to hunger cues: eat when truly hungry and without restricting food
  5. Avoid moralizing food: food is no longer labeled as good or bad
friends eating at a restaurant

As I started to incorporate some of the guidelines, I noticed that I was starting to feel better, I wasn’t as tired and had more energy. I learned to pay attention to my body and my hunger cues. I stopped restricting food and started enjoying things, within moderation, to meet my goals. I’m also working towards giving myself grace when things happen instead of self-sabotaging.

Intuitive eating isn’t right for everyone. If you are experiencing certain health conditions or allergies, please follow your doctor’s medical advice.

If you’d like to learn more about intuitive eating, I encourage you to read Intuitive Eating: A revolutionary Program That Works by Evelyn Tribole, and Elyse Resch. They also have workbooks and journals to help you along on your journey.

Sources:

Jennings, K.-A. (2019, June 25). A Quick Guide to Intuitive Eating. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/quick-guide-intuitive-eating

Sparks, A. (2021, August 23). What is intuitive eating? Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/intuitive-eating

Sreenivas, S. (2021, March 5). What is intuitive eating? Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/diet/what-is-intuitive-eating

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu

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I absolutely love a great road trip. There is something so precious about being in the car with family or friends with the radio blaring and the country rushing by. And yet, my good intentions for eating healthy on vacation go out the window as we stop to refill the gas tank and the candy bar displays and fast food restaurants seem to be calling out for me to eat.

There are a few tips and tricks I’ve picked up over the years taking both short and long road trips that have helped me to eat healthier on-the-go. With a little bit of preparation and intentionality, it is possible to make healthier choices than the candy bars and fast food options, just by taking a few minutes to pack a small cooler and prep items like fruits, veggies, and cheese sticks.  

MyPlate.gov reminds us to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, protein foods, and dairy or fortified soy alternatives. Remember each day to make your plate colorful and choose nutrient-rich choices to make every bite count. By pulling over to the road side rest stop and having a picnic, you will also be able to stretch your legs and enjoy some fresh air.

There are many options for healthy packing. Here are a few of my family’s favorites:

  • Dairy: cheese sticks, yogurt pouches, travel-sized milk
  • Vegetables: celery sticks, carrot sticks, peppers, salsa
  • Fruits: strawberries, blueberries, grapes, pineapple cups, applesauce pouches, apples
  • Protein: sliced meats, nut butter, hummus, nuts, hard boiled eggs
  • Grains: whole wheat bread or crackers, oatmeal energy bars, air-popped popcorn, rice cakes
  • Hydration: water first for thirst

TO PREPARE FOR SUCCESS

Anything worth doing takes a little more time. This is true for healthier eating on a road trip. Usually the week before a trip is busy, busy, busy and you want to not add one more thing to your schedule.  However, everyone will have a better trip if there is a healthy snack or meal option on the road.

  • Schedule time on your calendar for buying and prepping healthy food options. Don’t forget to purchase take-along storage containers or baggies if you do not have any.
  • Look ahead to the route you will be taking and plan stops where you will be able to stretch your legs and refuel your body (and not just your vehicle). 
  • Clean the kitchen before you head to the grocery so that when you come home you can prep the food right away.  
  • Plan your trip menu using a printable template like the one below, or design one of your own. This will also help you stay within your food budget for the trip.  
  • Give everyone in the family money that they can use for “sometimes foods” when you stop to refuel.  When my kiddos were younger, giving them each $5-10 to use on the whole trip for snacks usually sent them to the cooler instead of purchasing sodas or candy bars.

Just like anything we do, being proactive and planning ahead will help your road trip be more successful and you will arrive at your destination without the bloating and sugar overload that changes in diet can cause.  Best of luck and safe travels!

Written By: Jami Dellifield, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Hardin County

Reviewed By: Jenny Lobb, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Franklin County

RESOURCES:

U.S. Department of Agriculture. What is MyPlate? https://www.myplate.gov/eat-healthy/what-is-myplate 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2021). Healthy snacks: Quick tips for parents. My Healthfinder. https://health.gov/myhealthfinder/topics/everyday-healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-snacks-quick-tips-parents

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Meat substitutes, such as tofu or soy protein, have existed since the 1960s and often resemble the meat they are replacing. However, plant-based meat alternatives have become more common on your grocery store shelves and often do not resemble meat. As they are more widely available, you might be curious about adding them to your menu rotation. Here are a few suggestions for trying a meat substitute:

Consider making your own. Often these plant-based “meats” are made of familiar ingredients such as cauliflower, beans, mushrooms, or tofu. You can make your dishes meatless by substituting things like chicken for chickpeas. Or you can try making your meatless burger by combining vegetables you enjoy with black beans and rice.  This lentil burger from Celebrate Your Plate is easy and full of simple ingredients.

Read the labels on meatless products carefully. Meatless products are often higher in fiber, calcium, and iron compared to traditional meat. Some of these products may also be hiding more sodium than regular meat. Also, some meat alternatives are prepared with coconut oil, which is higher in saturated fat. When looking at the label you will need to consider your personal health goals. Whatever your nutritional goal maybe, be an informed consumer and check the label.

Trying a variety of brands and products may help you find a meat substitute you enjoy. Brands will have different tastes and textures.

Don’t forget other meatless options. Foods such as eggs, lentils, beans, tofu, nut butters, cottage cheese, edamame, noodles made from legume flour, and some mushrooms can also be a good substitute in dishes for meat.

Start with recipes you like and consider small swaps. Try lentils instead of meat in your favorite chili.  A meatless crumble that resembles the look and feel of ground beef could be used in a taco recipe. Trying a new substitute for a familiar food may help make the transition to meatless alternatives easier.

Written by: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Miami County. Barton.345@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Amanda Bennett, Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Ohio State University Miami County. Bennet.709@osu.edu

Sources:

Curtain, F., & Amp; Grafenauer, S. (2019, October 30). Plant-based meat substitutes in the Flexitarian age: An audit of products on supermarket shelves. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved April 27, 2022, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6893642/

Is meatless meat worth a try?  (2022). Strive, Spring 2022, 4.

Lentil burgers. Celebrate your plate.  Retrieved April 27, 2022, from https://celebrateyourplate.org/recipes/lentil-burgers

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MyPlate icon

Are you looking for easy, budget-friendly meal ideas? Check out the Shop Simple with MyPlate App! As you explore the App – which can be done from a phone, tablet or computer – you have the opportunity to discover budget-friendly recipes, farmer’s markets in your area, local savings opportunities, and specific information on different food items.

Want to find different ways to save money while eating healthily? This App has you covered! When browsing recipes in the App, the cost per serving is displayed, and recipes can be sorted by total cost on a scale from 1-4 in dollar signs. In the savings tab, you will find tips on how to make meal plans, shop smart, understand price tags to get more bang for your buck, and prepare healthy meals with the low-cost ingredients you find from the different MyPlate food groups.

National Nutrition Month 2022 graphic. Celebrate a World of Flavors.

This year, try using the App to find and create a new recipe for National Nutrition Month. The theme of this year’s National Nutrition Month is Celebrate a World of Flavors, so it’s a perfect time to try new flavors from around the world that honor different cultural foods and traditions. The App provides many different cultural recipes including Caribbean Casserole, Chicken Mole, Eggs Foo Young, Simple Mexican Salad and Spicy Southern Barbeque Chicken, just to name a few!

If you’re ready to take things a step further, check out the Start Simple with MyPlate App to set personalized healthy eating goals and track your progress and achievements. Although this App is designed for Smart phones, anyone can take the MyPlate quiz available online to set healthy eating goals and find resources to achieve those goals. With all these helpful tools available from MyPlate, you can be on your way to “making every bite count” in no time!     

Sources:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (2022). National Nutrition Month. https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month

USDA MyPlate. Shop Simple with MyPlate. https://www.myplate.gov/app/shopsimple

USDA MyPlate. Start Simple with MyPlate App. https://www.myplate.gov/resources/tools/startsimple-myplate-app

Written by Lillian Miller, Dietetics Student, Middle Tennessee State University and Jenny Lobb, MPH, RDN, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

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an Alexa echo device

Do you have an Alexa in your home? If you do, you’re one of nearly 40 million Americans who utilize this helpful virtual assistant! Now, in addition to playing music and podcasts and sharing the weather forecast, Alexa can also provide food and nutrition advice and science-based tips from the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The Dietary Guidelines are our nation’s leading science-based nutrition advice, and they are updated every five years to help people of all ages meet their nutrient needs, promote health, and prevent disease. For the first time, the 2020-2025 edition of the Dietary Guidelines is organized by life stage, and they contain nutrition guidance for infants and toddlers. In 2021, the MyPlate on Alexa skill was introduced to complement the guidelines and provide easily accessible, science-based food and nutrition information for people in all stages of life in a new and fun way.

MyPlate

For caregivers of children as young as 4 months of age to older adults, the MyPlate Alexa skill can help almost anyone incorporate more flavorful, nutritious foods into their diets with just a few words. The new skill is an integral part of MyPlate’s aim to help Americans reach their healthiest selves, achieving their nutrition and wellness goals based on preference and budget. In helping families introduce more nutritious meals into their homes, the development and continuation of healthy eating habits may be more easily achieved!

To access the MyPlate Alexa skill, you need either an Alexa device (Echo, Dot, etc.) or the free Amazon Alexa app downloaded onto your smartphone. To enable the skill, say “Alexa, enable the MyPlate skill!” to your device or app. This will open the MyPlate skill and you will be prompted to get started. Once enabled, say “Alexa, open MyPlate” to your device or app when you want to use the skill.

If you don’t have an Alexa device and you can’t or don’t want to download the Alexa app, you can still access food and nutrition advice based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans using other MyPlate tools, such as the Start Simple with MyPlate app and MyPlate quiz using a mobile device or web browser.

Written by Ellie Lennon, Undergraduate Student, Didactic Program in Dietetics, Middle Tennessee State University

Reviewed by Jenny Lobb, MPH, RDN, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Franklin County

Sources:

Dietary Guidelines for Americans: https://www.dietaryguidelines.gov/

MyPlate on Alexa: https://www.myplate.gov/myplateassistant

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Do you have a favorite Super Bowl snack? Many individuals and families have go-to foods for their Super Bowl watching parties and festivities. Unfortunately, many of those go-to foods are high in saturated fat and sodium. According to a survey from Statista, the most popular Super Bowl foods in 2021 were chips and dip, chicken wings, pizza and nachos. The good news is that there are healthier ways to prepare those items! The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend we:

  • Follow a healthy dietary pattern at every life stage
  • Customize and enjoy nutrient-dense food and beverage choices to reflect personal preferences, cultural traditions and budgetary considerations
  • Focus on meeting food group needs with nutrient-dense foods and beverages
  • Stay within calorie limits
  • Limit foods and beverages higher in added sugars, saturated fat and sodium
  • Limit alcohol consumption

If you want to prepare, serve, or enjoy a favorite Super Bowl snack that aligns with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, try one of the following methods or recipes:

guacamole and crackers

Chips and Dip – Make a veggie-based dip such as guacamole or spinach dip and serve with whole-grain crackers or tortilla chips.

Chicken wings – Instead of ordering out, buy frozen chicken wings and prepare them in an oven or air fryer.

English muffin pizzas topped with olives

Pizza – Whether you order or make your pizza, load it up with veggies! If cooking at home, try a herbed garden pizza or English muffin bite-sized pizzas.

Nachos – Swap out the chips for veggies in this unique Bell Pepper Nacho recipe. Not a fan of bell peppers? Try these loaded potato skins with buffalo chicken and/or your favorite nacho toppings.

If you have a favorite Super Bowl recipe that features fruits and veggies, please share using the comment box below!

Written by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Reviewed by Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Miami County

Sources:

Dietary Guidelines for Americans. https://www.dietaryguidelines.gov/

Celebrate Your Plate. https://celebrateyourplate.org/

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As a Registered Dietitian, I love when February rolls around! I break out my wardrobe of red and heart themes to raise awareness of heart disease and best practices to take care of your heart in honor of American Heart Month

In January of this year, we learned of a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health revealing people who consume higher amounts of olive oil may lower their risk of premature death overall from specific causes including cardiovascular disease.  According to this study, swapping out the butter or other artery-clogging fats in your diet may add years to your life. 

This study revealed that individuals consuming more than a ½ tablespoon of olive oil daily are less likely to die from heart disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s or lung disease when compared to people who consume less of this healthy fat.

Researchers encourage individuals to pay attention to their overall diet quality and lifestyle. A key factor is to add olive oil into the diet as a substitution for other, unhealthier fats. Olive oil is rich in healthy antioxidants, polyphenols, and vitamins and is a good source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats.

After this study was revealed, a great discussion was held with my colleagues.  We were encouraged by the results of this new information and began examining how to add more olive oil into our diets.

We determined that replacing a fat is different from adding one to your diet, and one of the easiest ways to replace butter and other animal fats is with olive oil. To make an easy transition and introduce olive oil into our diets, if a recipe contains butter, cut out half the butter and replace it with olive oil. Introducing more olive oil into our diets can also be accomplished with using infused olive oil to flavor whole grains, vegetables, and proteins, or by  dipping bread into olive oil bread dip. This easy and healthy dip is made by combining high quality extra virgin olive oil (richer in flavor and intended for dipping) with spices such as garlic powder, oregano, rosemary, basil, or crushed red pepper flakes. Use a crusty bread or Artisan loaf for dipping.

Living heart-healthy involves understanding your risk, making choices, and taking steps to reduce your chances of getting heart disease. By taking these preventive measures, you can lower your risk of developing heart disease and improve your overall health and well-being.

Written by:       Beth Stefura, RD,LD, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Mahoning County,                The Ohio State University, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:     Jenny Lobb, RD,LD, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Franklin County, The Ohio State University, lobb.3@osu.edu

References

American College of Cardiology (2022). Higher olive oil intake associated with lower risk of CVD mortality. Science Daily. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/01/220110145249.htm

American Heart Association (2021). Saturated Fat. https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/fats/saturated-fats

Gordon, B. (2021). Choose Healthy Fats. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/choose-healthy-fats

Palmer, S. (2011). Olive Oil California Style! This Golden-Green Liquid Is Fragrant, Flavorful, and Bursting With Heart Health Benefits. Today’s Dietitian. https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/100111p30.shtml

Webb, D. (2013). Phytochemicals’ Role in Good Health. Today’s Dietitian. https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/090313p70.shtml.

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Are You Stuck in a Cooking Rut?

I usually like to cook. In fact, I would cook more often if someone else always did the cleanup. At times I can feel like I get stuck in a rut with lack of inspiration leading to the redundancy of the same few recipes. This boredom leads to ordering more takeout and delivery, which often costs more time and money and increases the consumption of less healthy food. If you are finding yourself “stuck in a rut” and lacking inspiration here are a few ideas to shake up your everyday food routine.

A bowl of cereal with berries and nuts

Breakfast
Let’s start with breakfast, do you always eat the same thing? I like having cereal but after a few days it can become monotonous, and I find myself skipping this important meal or grabbing something unhealthy on the way to work. Try adding hot or cold cereal to the routine; include berries or other fruit in your meal or even on your cereal. Did you know adding more protein to breakfast will help you feel fuller longer? Easy sources of protein include eggs, yogurt, or milk. If you are looking for vegetarian or vegan friendly options, you can add a dairy alternative milk, seeds or nuts to your cereal or breakfast smoothie, or beans to a breakfast burrito.

Lunch
Lunch time meal shake ups may depend on your situation and if you have access to kitchen equipment, including a microwave. Salads can be a great way to incorporate more vegetables into your diet and shake up your meal ideas. Check out this recipe for Mason jar burrito bowl salads, another idea is to plan for leftovers. For example, you can, cook a little more of a main dish at dinner to ensure leftovers for lunch. For changes to your sandwiches try a new ingredient, make it a wrap, or turn your sandwich into a salad. One of my favorite lunchtime meals is to utilize healthy snack items as my lunch, such as hummus with veggies and pita chips, a yogurt parfait with granola and fruit, or crackers with cheese and nuts.

A tablet with recipe

Dinner
One the best ways to change up your dinner routine is to find new recipes. If you search recipes online, you can quickly become overwhelmed with all the possibilities. To reduce the fatigue of shifting through millions of recipes look for certain main ingredients or protein or, try to stick to staple ingredients that you already have in your pantry. The Ohio State University SNAP-Ed team has a great recipe website with many easy, low-cost recipes, check them out at CelebrateYourPlate.org

Still need inspiration? You can also try these ideas:

  • Have a recipe swap with friends.
  • Refresh a traditional family recipe.
  • Try cooking once and eating twice.
  • Pick one or two new recipes to try per week and have your family vote on their favorites.
  • Involve the rest of the family by having them choose a new recipe (this is a great way to involve your kids in learning to cook).
  • Explore a cuisine from another culture.

Whatever you decide to do, remember making small changes can benefit both your health and your wallet.

Written By: Laura Halladay, NDTR, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Greene County

Reviewed By: Laura Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Warren County

Sources:

Harvard Health. (2018, December 1). Extra protein at breakfast helps control hunger. Retrieved January 3, 2022, from https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/extra-protein-at-breakfast-helps-control-hunger

Healthy meals: Low cost recipes. Celebrateyourplate. (n.d.). Retrieved January 3, 2022, from https://celebrateyourplate.org/

Henneman, A. (2019, October 14). How to cook once and eat twice. UNL Food. Retrieved January 3, 2022, from https://food.unl.edu/how-cook-once-and-eat-twice

Oliver, V. (2020, December 8). Make a week’s worth of lunches with Burrito Bowl Mason jar salads. Make a week’s worth of lunches with Burrito Bowl Mason Jar Salads | UK Human Resources. Retrieved January 3, 2022, from https://www.uky.edu/hr/thrive/12-08-2020/make-week%E2%80%99s-worth-lunches-with-burrito-bowl-mason-jar-salads

Photo Credit:
Sarah Cervera via Unsplash – Breakfast bowl with berries, nuts, and grains.
Jeff Sheldon via Unsplash – Recipe displayed on tablet.

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