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Posts Tagged ‘healthy heart’

ginormous

Did you know the body needs only a very small amount of sodium in the diet to function? According to the American Heart Association, that amount is less than 500 mg per day, which in cooking terms is about ¼ of a teaspoon. The reality, unfortunately, is that very few of us come close to keeping our sodium intake that low.   Most people consume a lot more—a whopping 3,400 milligrams per day on average.  What’s even scarier? 97% of Americans do not know, or seriously underestimate, their daily sodium intake. The newly released 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting our daily amount of sodium consumption to 2,300 mg or less per day.

The majority of sodium we consume in the diet is in the form of salt. Where is it hiding, you ask? Approximately 77% of sodium intake comes from restaurant meals, processed foods and prepackaged foods.  To illustrate, fresh broccoli contains a mere 27 mg of sodium. However, if it’s processed into canned cream of broccoli soup, it shifts from 27 mg to 770 mg of sodium!

Which foods are the top sources of sodium? The list includes:

  1. Breads
  2. Lunch Meats
  3. Pizza
  4. Soups
  5. Sandwiches, including burgers
  6. Cheese

Here are five tips to help you limit your sodium intake:

*Read labels and make yourself aware of serving sizes. This can be a real eye opener when looking at the sodium content in many products sold at the grocery stores.  Foods that contain 20% or more of the % Daily Value for sodium are considered high in sodium; 5% or less is considered low.

*At a restaurant, ask the chef or cook to prepare your food without salt.

*When shopping, choose fresh and/or less processed vegetables. If purchasing frozen, try to avoid added salts and sauces.

* Don’t put the salt shaker on the table. Even though salting at the table only accounts for about 6% of our total salt intake, every little bit helps.

* Use herbs and spices to flavor food instead of cooking with salt.

 

Sources: The American Heart Association  http://sodiumbreakup.heart.org/

 

Written by: Susan Zie, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension – Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

 

Reviewed by: Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extesnion- Erie County, Green.308.osu.edu

 

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Hearts Dancing

I like to dance.  I am not even talking about any particular style of dance – just moving around to the music.  I know I am not very good at it, and almost always I think I look out of sorts when I see myself in the living room mirror dancing.  But I don’t care because dancing feels wonderful to me!

One of the huge benefits of dancing is improved condition of your heart and lungs.  According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to maintain good health we should aim for 30 minutes of moderate activity at least five days a week or 150 minutes a week.  Breaking up the 30 minutes into three 10 minute segments helps to get in the 30 minutes each day.  Dancing at home, alone or with others, for one of the three segments will help you easily obtain this daily goal.

We know exercise should be a part of our daily routine so why not choose an activity that we enjoy.  The great thing about dancing on your own, no specific style – no one around, is that no matter your age, size, or physically active level, you move at your own pace and in your own way.  There is no right or wrong way to dance – just move to your favorite music.

February is American Heart Month.  Heart disease, a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart, is the leading cause of death for both men and women.

Reduce your risk of heart disease and dance – dance to your heart’s content!

Writer: Candace J. Heer, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Morrow County, Heart of Ohio EERA, heer.7@osu.edu

Reviewer: Marilyn Rabe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, Heart of Ohio EERA, rabe.9@osu.edu

Resources:

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Dance_health_benefits?open

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/hearttruth/downloads/html/hhh/learn-new-moves.htm

http://newsroom.heart.org/news/heart-disease-and-stroke-continue-to-threaten-u-s-health

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/expert-answers/exercise/faq-20057916

Photo Credits:

http://www.rgbstock.com/photo/mgyrhUE/dancing+hearts+1

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