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Posts Tagged ‘Healthy Living’

The laughter of a child is associated with happiness, bonding, and connecting. However, laughter in children is more than these things, it is how they learn and grow. A rousing game of peek-a-boo for a little one shows you they understand their loved one is behind those hands, and they enjoy the element of anticipation, and will giggle with relief when their loved one reappears. The child learns that what at first might be scary, can become fun. It also helps the child to predict behaviors in future situations.

As toddlers gain mastery of language, rhyming and nonsensical jumbled sounds or phrases become comedy hour for a 2-year-old. Their laughter tells you they understand that those words, phrases, and sounds are silly, and don’t really belong in the conversation. Children at this age also correlate objects to specific purposes or places. So, putting underwear on their heads is hilarious because they know it doesn’t belong there. They know they are being silly, and this is their way of telling you a joke.

Photo by Hannah Nelson on Pexels.com

With age comes better mastery of verbal skills, development of creativity, and problem-solving. Silly words and games are no longer the knee-slapping, laughter-inducing skits they once were. Their sense of humor has matured, as have they. A child at the mature age of six will flourish in the world of riddles, puns, and jokes. These forms of laughter inducing play help the child build their understanding of logical thought, deepen their understanding of language, and think creatively to problem solve.

When you change your perspective from laughter being a by-product of childhood and re-frame it for what it really is, childhood development, you gain a whole new perspective on peek-a-boo, silly words and noises, or riddles, puns, and jokes. Laughter is learning, growing, exploring, bonding, connecting, and so much more. Find time to laugh, no matter your age.

Written by: Dr. Roseanne Scammahorn, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Darke County, Scammahorn.5@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

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Going on vacation may seem like a great excuse to overindulge, but just because you are going on vacation does not mean you should take a break from your health. A healthy vacation allows you to enjoy your trip and be physically, mentally, and emotionally restored.

Here are a few areas to keep in mind as you plan for a healthy vacation.

Meals/Eating   

Healthy meal of salmon and vegetables

Try to stick to your normal routine, including normal number of meals and snacks. Try to eat at your usual times; consuming your typical portion. Most restaurants post their menus online so you can plan ahead to find restaurants that have healthier options. Pack or stop at a local store to keep healthy snacks on hand, or even visit a local farmers market for fresh produce. If you are staying at a hotel with breakfast opt for healthier options like eggs, yogurt, and fruit. If your vacation rental or hotel has kitchen appliances, stock with healthy snacks and breakfast items can save both your waistline and your wallet.

Did you know if you are thirsty that your body is already dehydrated? Dehydration can lead to mood changes, headaches, and feelings of fatigue. Stay hydrated during travel and throughout each day, especially when visiting warmer climates, when being more active, or indulging in alcohol. Make accessing water easier and reduce waste by add an empty water bottle to your packing list.

Activity/Exercise

Depending on your vacation style you may need to have a plan to be active. Aim for 30 to 60 minutes of activity each day. Explore the town on foot, rent a bicycle, look up local hikes, or utilize the hotel gym. During your travel days find time to stand up, stretch, and move. Walk the concourse during layovers, stroll around a rest area, or stretch throughout your journey.

Sun safety gear, hat

Sun Safety  

Wherever you are traveling be sure to prioritize sun safety. Pack water-resistant, broad-spectrum sunscreen of at least 30 SPF (Sun Protection Factor). Apply 30 minutes before heading outside and reapply every 2 hours, especially if swimming or sweating. There is no such thing as a safe or base level tan. Avoid tanning beds and long unprotected exposure to the sun. Pack or buy a fun new hat and try renting an umbrella if spending the day at the beach.

Sleep/Rest

Prioritize sleep and rest during your trip, not every second of every day must be filled. Allow for the recommended eight hours of sleep each night and capitalize on being away. Enjoy some down time during your trip to help restore your mind and body.

 When you prioritize your health and include these tips in your vacation plan you will find your mind and body more rested and restored when you return from your healthy vacation.

Written by: Laura Halladay, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Greene County.

Reviewed by: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Miami County.

Sources:

Brinkman, P. (2016, February 18). Keeping sun safe. Ohioline. Retrieved March 2, 2022, from https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/hsc-7

Harvard Medical School. (n.d.). Consequences of insufficient sleep. Consequences of Insufficient Sleep | Healthy Sleep. Retrieved March 2, 2022, from https://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/healthy/matters/consequences

Moser, M. (2012, May 30). Don’t let vacation go to waist. Chow Line. Retrieved March 2, 2022, from https://u.osu.edu/chowline/2012/05/30/dont-let-vacation-go-to-waist/

Poitras, C. (2012, February 21). Even mild dehydration can alter mood. UConn Today. Retrieved March 2, 2022, from https://today.uconn.edu/2012/02/even-mild-dehydration-can-alter-mood/

Photo Credit:

Marijana1 via Pixabay – Summer-Sun protection items https://pixabay.com/photos/summer-summer-flat-lay-flat-lay-3490611/

YenniVance via Pixabay – Healthy meal with salmon and veggies  https://pixabay.com/photos/salmon-food-healthy-dinner-meal-1312372/

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fresh strawberries and flowers

Join the “Spring Into Wellness” Email Challenge Now!

Challenge Dates: April 4 – May 15, 2022

Topics Covered:

  • Financial Wellness
  • Social Wellness
  • Intellectual Wellness
  • Creative Wellness
  • Environmental Wellness
  • Emotional Wellness
  • Physical Wellness
  • Occupational Wellness
  • Spiritual Wellness
  • Balance

What is the cost? It’s FREE!!

Who can participate? Any adult with an email account.

How do I sign up? Look at this chart and find your county. Go to the link beside your county and register before March 28, 2022.

County Registration Link
Belmont go.osu.edu/LHLWBelmont
Brown go.osu.edu/LHLWclermontbrown
Butler go.osu.edu/LHLWButler
Carroll go.osu.edu/LHLWCarroll
Champaign go.osu.edu/LHLWChampaign
Clark go.osu.edu/LHLWClark
Clermont go.osu.edu/LHLWclermontbrown
Coshocton go.osu.edu/LHLWCoshocton
Darke go.osu.edu/LHLWdarmerpreb
Defiance go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Fairfield go.osu.edu/LHLWFairfield
Franklin go.osu.edu/LHLWFranklin
Fulton go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Hancock go.osu.edu/LHLWHancock
Hardin go.osu.edu/LHLWHardin
Henry go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Hocking go.osu.edu/LHLWFairfield
Holmes go.osu.edu/LHLWHolmtusc
Knox go.osu.edu/LHLWKnox
Licking go.osu.edu/LHLWLicking
Lucas go.osu.edu/LHLWLucas
Mahoning go.osu.edu/LHLWMahoning
Medina go.osu.edu/LHLWMedina
Mercer go.osu.edu/LHLWdarmerpreb
Monroe go.osu.edu/LHLWMonroe
Morrow go.osu.edu/LHLWMorrow
Ottawa go.osu.edu/LHLWOttawaSandusky
Paulding go.osu.edu/LHLWpauputvw
Perry go.osu.edu/LHLWPerry
Pickaway go.osu.edu/LHLWPickaway
Pike go.osu.edu/LHLWPike
Preble go.osu.edu/LHLWdarmerpreb
Putnam go.osu.edu/LHLWPauputvw
Ross go.osu.edu/LHLWRoss
Sandusky go.osu.edu/LHLWOttawaSandusky
Trumbull go.osu.edu/LHLWTrumbull
Van Wert go.osu.edu/LHLWPauputvw
Warren go.osu.edu/LHLWWarren
Washington go.osu.edu/LHLWWashington
Williams go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Wood go.osu.edu/LHLWWood

If your county isn’t listed, you may register with this link:

go.osu.edu/lhlwopen

For more information, contact Lisa Barlage, barlage.7@osu.edu or Roseanne Scammahorn scammahorn.5@osu.edu. 

Spring into Wellness with Extension!

Sponsored by Ohio State University Extension

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Let’s face it the last couple of years has been a whirlwind of events that have challenged us all!  The pandemic, racial tensions, natural disasters, and now the war in Ukraine. That isn’t even including the daily events in our lives that add stressors.  Talking to our kids about difficult subjects is one of the toughest things a parent has to do.  It’s hard to put the words together to address such big issues.

Communication helps us to process and to make sense of things we don’t understand. Offering guidance, a listening ear, and explaining current events brings comfort and allows children to understand and process subjects that are challenging (even if we don’t know all the answers).

Allow your child to lead the conversation. This helps you learn exactly what they are concerned about, so you can address it. Ask open-ended questions to gauge their understanding, make sure you are not distracted, and take your time. Making eye contact and repeating back what they say without judgment teaches them how to be good listeners and gives them the opportunity to correct any misunderstandings. Be sure to let them know you are there to talk to them when they are comfortable and ready. Lastly, be honest. If you don’t know the answer it is ok to say, “I don’t know, can I get back to you on that?”  Lying can cause damage and may result in the child getting information somewhere else.  It is best that they get information from a trusted adult.

Talking about difficult subjects with children’s guidelines:   

  • Be honest
  • Limit small kids’ exposure to age-appropriate subjects by turning off social media, tv, radio
  • Let them know you are a safe person to share with
  • Listen and ask questions
  • Acknowledge their feelings. Let them know you understand it is OK to have these feelings of uncertainty. 
  • Ask what they would do if they were in a difficult situation
  • Get them to consider solutions
  • Ask them if they ideas to help or change the situation and what they can do

Sources:

Walls, T. (2020.) How to Talk to Your Child About the News. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/news.html

Rocker, L. (2020). Breaking Bad News to Your Children.  https://www.childpsychologist.com.au/resources/breaking-bad-news-to-your-children-quirky-kids-6-top-tips

Children’s Museum Team, (2020). 7 Tips for Talking to Your Kids About Difficult Subjects. https://www.cmosc.org/talking-about-difficult-subjects/

Written by:  Kellie Lemly M.Ed., Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Champaign County, lemly.2@osu.edu

Reviewer: Roseanne Scammahorn, Ph.D. Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Darke County, scammahorn.5@osu.edu

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Three young people standing outside, one looking through binoculars and one pointing

Recently, I met an 11-year-old who likes birds. Since I self-identify as a bird nerd, we started talking and I quickly realized this young person had a genuine curiosity and passion for birds. She told me she had checked out Smithsonian Handbooks: Birds of North America from her school library and had no intention of returning it.

As a parent of teenagers, I struggle to get my kids off screens and out in nature, despite my constant reminders about the health benefits of getting outdoors. Here was a young person who wanted to get outside, so we made plans to go birding together.

And birding we did. The two of us spent 5 hours out in the cold on a gloomy, gray day and we had a blast. She brought (and I carried) the large, heavy Smithsonian library book with her. When we spotted a bird, she knew exactly where to find it in the book.

It was delightful to bird with a young person who was excited and engaged. I look forward to birding with her and other young people in the future. After spending time with a young birder, it became clear to me why we should take young birders under our wing:

  • They are connecting with nature: Our young people are disconnected from the natural world. Studies found that 8- to 12-years-old spend 4 to 6 hours on screens every day, while teens spend up to 9 hours. Time spent on screens almost always equates to time spent indoors, disconnected from nature.
  • They can showcase their strengths: Birdability is a non-profit organization that “ensures that birding truly is for everybody and every body, regardless of disability or other health concerns.” Their blog has stories from birders who are autistic, color-blind, hearing-impaired, and mobility-challenged. One young birder described her ADHD as her birding superpower since she saw and heard so many details around her!
  • They benefit from Vitamin N (Nature): There are decades of research that show the positive impact that spending time outdoors has on our mental and physical health. Nature has unique health benefits to young people, especially when it comes to kids with ADHD, allergies, asthma, weight issues, and mental health challenges.
  • They are becoming environmental stewards: Children who spend time in nature are more likely to feel connected to nature as adults, and therefore, more likely to care for and protect the natural world.

After our birding outing, I purchased my new birding buddy her own copy of the Smithsonian Handbook. I am selfishly hoping the returned library book will inspire another young birder at her school. I also added a Birds of Ohio Field Guide to her collection so the next time we’re out birding, neither of us has to lug a 752-page handbook.

Additional Birding Resources:
To find more information about birds and birding, please visit: go.osu.edu/nature-matters-birds

25th Annual Great Backyard Bird Count photo

Written by Laura M. Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Warren County, stanton.60.osu.edu

Reviewed by Shari Gallup, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Licking County, gallup.1@osu.edu

Photo Credit: Kindel Media from Pexels

References:

Alsop, F. J. (2001). Smithsonian Handbooks: Birds of North America: Eastern Region. New York, NY: DK Publishing.

Wells, N. M. & Lekies, K. S. (2006). Nature and the Life Course: Pathways from Childhood Nature Experiences to Adult Environmentalism. Children, Youth and Environments, 16(1), 1–24. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.16.1.0001

Louv, R. (2008). Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

Scripps Health. (2022, January 10). Do Your Kids Spend Too Much Time in Front of a Screen? https://www.scripps.org/news_items/4688-do-your-kids-spend-too-much-time-in-front-of-a-screen

Stanton, L. M. (2021, February 11). Benefits of Being a Bird Nerd. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/02/11/benefits-of-being-a-bird-nerd

Stanton, L. M. (2021, April 19). Get Out! Celebrate Nature on Earth Day and Every Day. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/04/19/get-out-celebrate-nature-on-earth-day-and-every-day

Stanton, L. M. (2021, November 30). Wonder and Wander in Nature this Winter. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/11/30/wonder-and-wander-in-nature-this-winter

Tekiela, S. (2020). Birds of Ohio Field Guide. Cambridge, MN: Adventure Publications.

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This time of year, people are reflecting on the previous year and making resolutions. Most of the time, those new resolutions only last a few days or weeks, and they are forgotten by February. The start of a new year is the perfect time for a fresh start and an opportunity to change bad habits, that can help you grow emotionally, socially, physically, or psychologically. 

Take your time planning and choosing your resolution. Creating a detailed plan will assist you in sticking to your goal. Write down the strategies you will implement, the steps you will take, and why you want to do it. This will help keep you on track. 

Remember to be realistic when making your resolution and make one change at a time.  Don’t set yourself up for failure by trying to change everything at once. Take control of one habit and then move to another. For example:  If your resolution is to change an eating habit, take one small simple step at a time. Step one: Drink more water. Step two: Start the day by eating a healthy breakfast. Step three: Add more activity each week. Focusing on one small change instead of big changes will help you accomplish your goal. 

Reward yourself. Set little rewards for meeting your goals or steps along the way to help you stay motivated. Make the reward something that will encourage you to stay on track and motivated to keep moving toward your goal.

Sometimes, changes involve setbacks. Don’t give up on your goal. If you mess up and stray from your plan, think about the reasons you want to change. Get back on track and make it happen. 

Sources:

Clear, J. (2021) How To Start New Habits that Actually Stick.  https://jamesclear.com/three-steps-habit-change

Kliff, S. (2014).  The Science of Actually Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution.  https://www.vox.com/2014/12/29/7434433/new-years-resolutions-psychology

The Ohio State Univeristy. (2021, June 28). Creating Healthy Habits that Last. Retrieved on December 15, 2021, https://recsports.osu.edu/articles/creating-healthy-habits-that-last/

Written by:  Kellie Lemly M.Ed., Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Champaign County, lemly.2@osu.edu

Reviewer: Roseanne Scammahorn, Ph.D. Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Darke County, scammahron.5@osu.edu

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This time of year can be more comfortable than the dog days of summer to work on cleaning projects around your home. There are many reasons that people choose to make their own cleaning mixtures. For some, it is the simple knowledge of what they are using. Unlike food labels, all ingredients on cleaning products are not required to be listed on the packaging.

Amber spray bottles with homemade cleaners

Some people are very sensitive to chemical compounds found in commercial cleaning products. According to University of Arkansas Extension Specialist Margaret Harris, about 16 percent of individuals are extremely sensitive to chemicals, easily breaking out in rashes or with other chronic ailments.

People may also be interested in making their own cleaners because of environmental concerns. There are certainly more “green” labeled products than there used to be. Unfortunately, they can also come with a hefty price tag. Therefore, another reason to make your own household cleaners is that the ingredients are relatively inexpensive.

There are several characteristics of different cleaner ingredients. One category is base or alkali, which are good for removing dirt, fat, and grease. In homemade cleaners, these ingredients are baking soda (mild), borax (moderate), and washing soda (strong).

Cleaners and ingredients including castille soap, hydrogen peroxide, salt, baking soda, borax, washing soda and a spray bottle

Acids are used to break down rust, mineral deposits, and hard water stains. They can also be good for glass, windows, and mold. Vinegar and lemon juice are common acids that can be used. Detergents loosen dirt and lift it up and out of the way. Washing soda and borax, as well as vegetable and coconut oils, act as detergents.

Just like they sound, abrasives wear off dirt by rubbing. Baking soda or salt can be used for this purpose. Bleaches and sanitizers can involve more than chlorine bleach. Milder sources that can whiten, remove stains, as well as reduce numbers of bacteria include sunlight, hydrogen peroxide, and tea tree oil.

One thing to remember with most homemade recipes is that they may take more contact time or elbow grease than some commercial cleaners. Patience and persistence are key. The University of Arkansas has several recipes available for a variety of cleaning purposes.

I appreciate that they have a mild, stronger, and strongest version for every situation. They recommend starting with the mildest formulation and increasing the strength of ingredients only when needed. Here is an example of all-purpose cleaners:

Mild All-Purpose Cleaner

½ cup white vinegar, ¼ cup baking soda, ½ gallon hot water. Mix ingredients and pour into a spray bottle.

Strong All-Purpose Cleaner

2 tablespoons borax, ¼ cup white vinegar, 2 cups hot water. Mix all ingredients in a spray bottle.

Our house is clean enough to be healthy, and dirty enough to be happy.”

Unknown

Extra Strength All-Purpose Cleaner

3 tablespoons white vinegar, ½ teaspoon washing soap, ½ teaspoon castile soap, 2 cups hot water. Mix all ingredients in a spray bottle.

A few drops of essential oils could be added to any of these.

It is also helpful to know where to purchase some of these ingredients that we may not be as familiar with. Washing soda and borax are powders and are both located in the laundry section of the grocery store. Castile soap comes in liquid and bar form and can be found either with shampoos and hand soaps or in natural/organic sections of supermarkets. Happy cleaning!

Written by: Emily Marrison, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Coshocton County

Reviewed by: Melissa J. Rupp, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Fulton County

Sources:

Harris, M. Clean and Green: Healthy Homes, Healthy People. University of Arkansas Extension Publication MP 492. https://www.uaex.edu/publications/pdf/MP492.pdf

Keel, M. and Hinds, B. (2015) Make Your Home Healthy – Keep It Clean. University of Tennessee Extension Publication W318-A. https://extension.tennessee.edu/publications/Documents/W318-A.pdf

Rabe, M. (2015). Fall Cleaning. Live Healthy, Live Well. https://livehealthyosu.com/2015/08/17/fall-cleaning/

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Recently, at girls’ night, a discussion was held about the challenges many faced this past year during the pandemic.  Isolation, fear, contact restrictions, financial, illness, loss and food insecurities were discussed.  The conversation quickly changed to activities that began during the pandemic  we have enjoyed and wish to continue.   Quality time spent with family and friends was a common theme.  Many shared their own rituals which include:

  • Curbside pickup.  Ordering from the drugstore to the grocery store allows more time to spend at home and shop less.  This eliminates impulse shopping!
  • Started a group text with our three adult children and their spouses to keep in touch and check in with each other.
  • Monthly family “Zoom chats”.  This started when we could not get together for the holidays and has continued monthly.  We all look forward to these monthly family sessions and catch up on the comings and goings.
  • Shared photos of recipes we prepared and included the recipes. This has expanded our cooking techniques and improved our meals!
  • Started to play the piano again. Each night before bedtime we sing our favorite songs together.  We find it very calming and have continued the practice.
  • My teenage daughter comes into my home office daily and we have a quick chat.
  • Zooming with my sisters located in Las Vegas, London, and New York City.  We spend every Saturday together for the first time in our adult lives.
  • During the month of October, we watched one scary movie each night.   On Halloween we held an awards show called The Scaries.  Movies are a family favorite and a great way to connect and celebrate during the quarantine.
  • We started taking weekend walks in the woods.  With playgrounds and indoor activities closed, we tried to visit all the nearby forest preserves and state parks.  We have enjoyed our walks immensely.
  • My two daughters came home for a few months last fall.  They both enjoy cooking and the show Chopped.  We created our own version of the show.  I collected ingredients to use and made-up baskets for each daughter to create an entrée and dessert.  My husband and I judged the results and we all had tons of fun!
  • Two weeks before Christmas, my musical family shared an outside concert with our neighborhood.  With a trumpet, flute, keyboard, and violin we played several songs to a social-distanced crowd.  It was magical!
  • We started taking daily long walks-rain or shine.  We look forward to these daily walks and enjoy the quality time together and the beauty of nature.
  • We love playing pickleball and purchased a portable sturdy pickleball net online.  Using sidewalk chalk, we measured a regulation court on our cul-de-sac and started playing family tournaments.  This summer we have expanded and invited friends and neighbors to join us.
  • On Christmas Eve, we scheduled a Zoom sing along of our favorite Christmas songs and everyone in our family across the country sang together and enjoyed our time together.

We all learned the importance of being creative with limited resources and space at home.  We appreciate these small acts of kindness and are grateful to family and friends that help boost our emotional wellbeing.  What family activity did you create during the pandemic you hope to continue?

Please share below on comments your favorite family activity.

Written by:  Beth Stefura, OSU Extension Educator, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Michelle Treber, OSU Extension Educator, Pickaway County, Treber.1@osu.edu

References:

Rituals in the Time of COVID-19: Imagination, Responsiveness, and the Human Spirit – PubMed (nih.gov)

A Crowd-Sourced Database of Coronamusic: Documenting Online Making and Sharing of Music During the COVID-19 Pandemic – PubMed (nih.gov)

Hope During COVID-19 Lockdown – PubMed (nih.gov)

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White, round pills with a blue background

If you have ever had leftover medication that you no longer needed, did you store it in your medicine cabinet in case you get the same illness in the future and want to have it readily available? Maybe you kept the medication in case you need it again for pain?  If yes, that is NOT OKAY!

Everyday more than 4,300 Americans misuse a prescription pain reliever for the first time. Prescription drug misuse is a public health concern in the United States. Prescription drug abuse is using prescription medication in a way not intended by the prescriber. It includes taking a friends prescription painkiller for your nagging backache or someone’s anti-anxiety pills to help one become calm. The prescription drugs most abused include opioid pain killers, anti- anxiety medications, sedatives and stimulants. Every day, more than 128 people die from an opioid overdose, and this includes both prescription medications and heroin.

Where do most people who misuse prescription pain relievers get them? From their doctors, the internet, or from family and friends? If you said family and friends, you are correct. Since most individuals who misuse prescription pain relievers get them from family or friends, it is very important to dispose of leftover medications properly when you are done using them.

a white box with locks on them and it says medication disposal in writing on it.

How to dispose of medications

 Once finished with a prescription, you have three options for disposal:

  1. Safely dispose of medications by putting them in a drug drop box.
  2. Find a drug take back program. Many communities offer programs that allow the public to bring unused medications to a central location for proper disposal. Take advantage of the drug take back programs in your community.
  3. If you do not have a drop box or take back program near you, dispose of medication safely at home by following these steps: 
  • Remove pills from their original container and mix them with undesirable substances such as kitty litter, coffee grounds or dirt.
  • Place the mixture in something you can close, such as a re-sealable storage bag, empty can or another container to prevent the drug from leaking or spilling out.
  • Throw the sealed mixture into the trash.
  • Scratch out all your personal information on the empty medicine package to protect your identity and privacy. Throw the medicine container away.

Remember to do YOUR part and do not leave unused or expired drugs around. Properly dispose of medications to help combat the prescription drug misuse epidemic.

Sources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/prescription-drug-abuse/symptoms-causes/syc-20376813

https://www.fda.gov/consumers/consumer-updates/where-and-how-dispose-unused-medicines

http://www.generationrx.org

Written by Susan Zies, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator Wood County

Reviewed by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

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Psychologist Carl Rogers believed that each of us have one basic motive in life: to self-actualize, meaning that our “ideal self” (who we would like to be) is congruent with our “self -image” (how we see ourselves). To achieve this balance, we must be living an authentic life.

What does it mean to live an authentic life?

According to Rogers’ theory, to live an authentic life, you must first understand what your beliefs and values are. Once you understand those core values, you maintain a balance by living according to those beliefs and values.

Authentic life = beliefs and values + actions and behaviors

It isn’t always about making waves, standing out in a crowd, or making sure you are unique or different; it is about being comfortable in your skin without worrying about how you compare to the rest of society.

There are health implications when we are living an authentic life. Those whose actions and behaviors are typically in line with their beliefs and values reap the benefits of feeling optimistic about life and tend to have positive self-esteem and an overall healthy psychological wellbeing. When we are out of sync, that is when life can become stressful, overwhelming, and discouraging.

To nurture self-authenticity, strive for the following:

  1. Awareness. The knowledge and acceptance that you are not just “one” thing (ex. extroverted versus introverted); rather you are multi-faceted with an understanding of your motives, emotions, strengths, weaknesses, dreams, goals, and aspirations.
  2. Unbiased Processing of Self-relevant Information. Objectively looking at our own positive and negative self-aspects, feelings, internal experiences, and private knowledge without denying the truth, distorting reality, or exaggerating (to create a more positive or favorable self-image).
  3. Behavior. Behaving according to our beliefs, values, preferences, and perceived needs rather than acting suitably to please society, obtain recognition or rewards, or to avoid punishment.
  4. Relational Orientation. Being yourself, open and honest in your actions and motives, in your relationships with others.

Further, you can practice these five things to help you live an authentic life:

  1. Openness to new experiences. Allow for ambiguity in situations and a willingness to view events without defensively distorting or censoring so that you can be on a path of growth.
  2. Mindful living. Living fully in the moment, being flexible and adaptable as you view life as fluid and ever changing.
  3. Going with your gut. Trust your inner experiences to guide your behaviors.
  4. Freedom. The choice about how to respond and feel about experiences is up to you.
  5. Creativity. Use creativity in your approach to living, rather than reverting to an established set of rules of behavior that might be restrictive.

If you really want to make a positive impact on your world, be you! Walk your own path, stay true to yourself, and embrace the differences in others. What a wonderful world to be authentically you!  

Sources:

Goldman, B. M., & Kernis, M. H. (2002). The role of authenticity in healthy psychological functioning and subjective well-being. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, 5(6), 18-20. https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2002-11420-003

Kernis, M. H. & Goldman, B. M. (2006). A multicomponent conceptualization of authenticity: Theory and Research. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 38.  https://depts.washington.edu/uwcssc/sites/default/files/hw00/d40/uwcssc/sites/default/files/The%20Authenticity%20Inventory.pdf

McLeod, S. (2008). Self-Concept. Simply Psychology. https://www.simplypsychology.org/self-concept.html#image

McLeod, S. (2014). Carl Rogers Theory. Simply Psychology. https://www.simplypsychology.org/carl-rogers.html

Wood, A. M., Linley, P. A., Maltby, J., Baliousis, M., & Joseph, S. (2008). The authentic personality: A theoretical and empirical conceptualization and the development of the Authenticity Scale. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55, 385–399. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0167.55.3.385

Written by: Dr. Roseanne E. Scammahorn, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Darke County

Reviewed by: Jennifer Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

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