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Posts Tagged ‘Healthy Tailgate’

In Buckeye land it is time for football games, tailgating or viewing parties. With those parties often comes heavy snacking. Why not start the season off right by making the switch to healthier food choices for future parties?  We are each responsible for making a few food or drink choices for the next party that we host or attend to help everyone maintain a healthier (not heavier) diet. 

When you plan your party keep in mind that a few healthy options can go a long way in contributing to the health of all Buckeyes (or Bobcats, Bengals, Browns, Bearcats, Cavaliers, Flyers, Monsters, Zips, Falcons, Flashes, or your home town team).

  • Start your party prep by purchasing a medium size plate, I know those tray size plates seem like they should be wonderful, but often contribute to over-eating or waste (you take something, but don’t eat it).
  • Plan beverages so you can serve infused water rather than soda. Make ice cubes or rings out of fruit in your team colors.
  • Switch burgers to leaner meats and serve them on whole grain slider buns. The bun switch alone can save you 180 calories.
  • Always serve fresh veggies and fruits with a low-fat dip.
  • Serve pizza with vegetable or fruit toppings; limit the extra meats and cheeses. If you are making your own consider a whole grain crust.chili-2
  • Modify your chili to include 2 types of beans, turkey sausage, diced sweet potatoes, and chopped peppers.
  • Serve quesadillas on whole grain tortillas, filled with chopped vegetables and low fat cheese.
  • Serve grilled chicken breasts or lean pork loins.
  • Switch your chips or pretzels to baked, veggie, or whole grain.

Don’t forget to be food safe at your tailgate or party too! Use coolers or tubs of ice to keep cold food cold on those first warm fall games. Ensure that grilled meats reach safe temperatures by using a meat thermometer: ground beef or ground pork should reach 160 degrees, all poultry 165 degrees, and steaks or chops 145 degrees.

We can’t wait to hear what you will be serving at your next tailgate. If you are looking for ideas here are a few http://go.osu.edu/healthtailgate. Comment with your healthy tailgate tip or recipe.

Sources:

Alabama A & M, Auburn University: http://news.aces.edu/blog/2016/10/05/host-healthy-tailgate-season/

University of Washington, https://www.washington.edu/wholeu/2014/09/30/healthytailgatefoods/

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, https://news.vanderbilt.edu/2014/10/09/vanderbilt-health-educator-offers-tips-for-healthy-tailgating/

Army HEALTH, http://blog.armyhealth.pbrc.edu/post/Healthy-Tailgating

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer:  Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fayette County.

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Buckeye Fans

Football season is here, which means tailgating and parties. Having delicious snacks and appetizers is a must when gathering to watch your favorite football teams, but most of the time what’s offered is laden with excessive calories, saturated fat, sodium, and sugar. You know the culprits–loaded nachos, dips, chips, burgers, wings, and sodas; not to mention alcohol. The list goes on. But party food does not have to be unhealthy. Being smart with your choices can help you avoid unnecessary calorie intake.

Hosting a “watching” party of your own is a perfect opportunity to take control of the food environment. Nachos are a perennial fan favorite, but instead of using tortilla chips as the base, why not use fresh leafy greens and convert them into a taco salad? Add a protein option such as shredded chicken, pork, or black beans and additional fresh ingredients such as diced tomato, lime, cilantro, and sliced avocado with just a sprinkle of cheese. By having the salad portion as a base and the chips as a garnish or side, you are less likely to over-indulge on the chips while still feeling satisfied taste-wise.

Instead of giant bowls of chips and crackers scattered all over the table, replace them with baked chips made from sliced zucchini or sweet potato. Add platters of fresh cut vegetables and fruit. Use reduced-fat, fat-free dairy ingredients or Greek yogurt in veggie dips. If you plan on making burgers and are using beef, try to look for the leanest choice. Be sure to provide plenty of fresh toppings such as the classic lettuce, tomato, and onion. When making wings, skip the breading and replace with a delicious marinade. Hot sauce is generally very low in calories and packs a punch of flavor and heat. Additional herbs and spices will help cut back on sodium.

If you plan on attending someone else’s tailgate party, keep in mind the following tips:

  • Eat a solid breakfast. Having a balanced meal (lean protein, fiber-rich carb, healthy fat, and even some vegetables) will make you less likely to munch on empty snacks all day.
  • When you arrive, skim the buffet table visually to see what’s there. Plan what to grab. Try to make your plate resemble the MyPlate guide. Go sit somewhere away from the table to enjoy your food. Lingering around the food table makes it more likely you’ll eat more than you should.
  • Drink plenty of water. Steer clear of sodas or juices/punches. Make a water infusion by adding fresh fruit or vegetables such as lemon, oranges, berries, cucumber, and/or mint.
  • As for alcohol, keep your intake limited. There is nothing wrong with enjoying a couple drinks before or during the game, but having more than that exceeds the limit recommended by the Dietary Guidelines (one drink for women, two drinks for men). More can really tack on empty calories.

Following these simple tips during game days will help set you up with the tools you need to stay healthy, while still having fun!

Photo Credit: http://ohiostate.247sports.com/Board/120/Contents/OT-Famous-Ohio-State-Fans-22870480?Page=2#M22881826

Writer: Shannon Erskine, Graduate Student, Bowling Green State University, serskin@bgsu.edu

Reviewers: Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

 

 

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Veggie Snack Ideas

Healthy Veggie Snacks

Fall is a great time to enjoy picnics, pot luck dinners or tailgating parties with friends and family.  Instead of fixing a traditional high fat food items, look for a healthy and tasty alternative. Here are some healthy ideas to try.

  • Start with fresh vegetables and fruits.  Serve cut up veggies with low-fat dips.
  • Fruit kabob (fresh fruit cut up and put on a skewer) with a yogurt dip make a pretty and tasty treat.
  • Serve Chili with extra beans for additional fiber and use extra lean ground beef or lean ground turkey to reduce fat content.

Love your traditional recipe?  Make your favorite tailgate recipe a little healthier with these simple changes: substitute reduced-fat cheese, fat-free sour cream, less meat in your dip, or serve them with whole grain chips or crackers.

Three recipes are included for your eating pleasure:

  • Try Hummus and pita chips or whole grain crackers.
  • Make a Marinated Broccoli salad for a high vitamin, lower calorie treat.
  • Try Cowboy (or Cowgirl) Caviar for a delicious dip with whole grain tortilla chips or crackers.

 Hummus

 Ingredients:

  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 2  tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 (15 ounce) can garbanzo beans, drained, liquid reserved
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, 2 tablespoons Tahini, or 2 tablespoons peanut butter
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional – 1/8 teaspoon red pepper or ½ teaspoon cumin (to taste)

Directions:

Place garbanzo beans in a blender or food processor with approximately 1 tablespoon reserved liquid. Process until smooth. Mix in the garlic, olive oil, sesame seeds, salt and pepper. Blend to desired consistency, increasing the amount of reserved garbanzo bean liquid as desired.  Chill in refrigerator until served; serve with whole wheat pita chips, whole wheat tortillas, or fresh veggies.

Keeps for 5 days refrigerated.

Marinated Broccoli Salad

Ingredients:                                             

4 cups broccoli florets

4 medium carrots, thinly sliced

2 small onions, sliced and separated in rings

1 can (2 ¼ oz.) sliced ripe olives, drained

1 jar (2 oz.) diced pimentos, drained

1 bottle (8 oz.) light Italian Salad Dressing

¾ cups chopped walnuts

Directions:

1.  Wash hands and assemble clean equipment.

2.  In a bowl, combine the broccoli, carrots, onions, olives and pimentos.  Add dressing and toss to coat.

3.  Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours.  Just before serving stir in walnuts.

Makes 8 servings.

Nutrient Analysis, per serving: 145 calories, 10 g. carbohydrates, 4 g. protein, 11 g. fat, Cholesterol 2 mg., 4 g. fiber, Sodium 321 mg.

Bean Salad

Cowboy Caviar

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15-ounce) can kidney beans, drained
  • 1 (15-ounce) can black beans, drained
  • 1 (15-ounce) can corn, drained
  • 1 (15-ounce) can crushed tomatoes or 2 medium tomatoes chopped
  • 1 (4-ounce) can chopped green chiles, drained or small green pepper chopped
  • ¼ cup onion, finely chopped
  • 3 limes juiced (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil or ¼ cup low-fat Italian Dressing
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

1. Mix kidney beans, black beans, corn, tomatoes, chilies, and onion in a large bowl.

2. Add lime juice, oil, salt, and pepper; toss gently to combine.

3. Serve alone or with tortilla chips

Makes: 16 (½ cup) servings

Nutrient Analysis per ½ cup serving: 90 calories, 1.5 grams of fat, 0 Cholesterol, 260 mg of sodium, 17 grams of Carbohydrate, 5 grams Dietary Fiber, 4 grams of Protein.

Sources:

Eating Smart – Being Active, Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, Ohio State University Extension.

Cooking for a Life Time, The University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, Cooperative Extension, http://www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/food/

Adapted from – SHS Wellness Programs, Utah Valley University, http://www.uvu.edu/wellnessed/nutrition/healthy_options_recipes.html

Broccoli salad photo credit- http://blog.preventcancer.org

Writer:  Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Pickaway County, Heart of Ohio EERA, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewers:  Dana Brown, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Morrow County, Heart of Ohio EERA, brown.4643@osu.edu
Lisa Barlage, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ross and Vinton Counties, Ohio Valley EERA, barlage.7@osu.edu

 

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