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Posts Tagged ‘Heart healthy’

heart

 

Now is the time to review what you know about women and heart disease. Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States. One out of four women in the United States will die from heart disease, while one woman out of thirty dies of cancer. Four out of five women who are 40-60 years of age have at least one risk factor for heart disease.

Are You At Risk?                                         heart-rate

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Family history of heart disease
  • Over the age of 55
  • Smoking
  • Overweight or obese
  • no regular exercise
  • Diet high in saturated fat

 

Some risk factors like age and family history cannot be changed, but all women have the power to make diet and lifestyle choices that can reduce these risks.

Take Care of Your Heart

  • Reduce the sources of saturated fat in your diet
  • Limit or reduce eating fried foods. You can do this by choosing cooking methods that do not submerge food in oil. Use cooking methods like baking, broiling, and steaming instead.
  • Choose low fat or fat free dairy products
  • Remove and discard the skin from turkey or chicken to reduce the saturated fat in your diet
  • Avoid fats that are solid at room temperature. Change to poly or unsaturated oils like olive oil or canola oil
  • Reduce sodium intake by limiting processed foods

 

Smoking cessation is good for your lungs and your cardiovascular system. The chemicals in tobacco smoke damage cells and the vessels that carry blood throughout the body.A lifestyle that includes many risk factors like smoking,making unhealthful food choices, remaining overweight or obese,and not getting regular exercise all add to your risk of developing heart disease.  Make a great choice for your health and stop smoking, or reduce the number of times that you smoke, starting today!

Signs and Symptoms

Heart attack symptoms for women can easily be dismissed as stress or the flu. Do not brush off symptoms that may be signs or symptoms of a heart attack or stroke. Common signs of heart attack in women include:

  • Sweating, nausea, or feeling faint or lightheaded. Feeling pressure or a feeling of fullness in the chest. This may be consistent, or brief and then returning.
  • Feeling uncomfortable, achy or sore in either or both arms, neck or jaw pain, back pain, or even stomach discomfort.
  • Feeling short of breath, with or without chest pains

Sources:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: The Heart Truth: A Campaign for Women About Heart Disease, HHS, NIH, NHLBI

American Heart Association: Know Your Numbers? | Go Red For Women®

Authors: Laura Brubaker, Dietetic Intern with OSU Extension, Wood County. Graduate Student studying Food and Nutrition at Bowling Green State Universtiy and Susan Zies,  Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Wood County.

 

Reviewer:Dan Remley, Assistant Professor, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, OSU Extension

 

 

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nationalredday

February is American Heart Month sponsored by The American Heart Association. It is no surprise that heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women. What may surprise a few, is that it’s the number one killer in women, claiming nearly 500,000 lives. Most people believed that it affects more men so many women did not pay much attention to the disease. National Wear Red Day was started to raise awareness about heart disease being the number one killer of women. Tomorrow will mark 15 years since the 1st National Wear Red Day was observed. National Wear Red Day is held on the first Friday in February.

Since raising awareness many women have been making changes in their lives to be more heart conscience. Some of the strides they’ve made have included losing weight, increasing their exercise, making a healthy behavior change and checking cholesterol levels. Today, nearly 300 fewer women die from heart disease and stroke each day, and deaths in women have decreased by more than 30 percent over the past 10 years! Even though all of this progress has been made, 1 in 3 women still die of heart disease and stroke each year.

 

So what can you do besides wear RED tomorrow? Know your heart healthy numbers.

  1. Risk factors you can* and cannot control
    1. High blood pressure*
    2. Diabetes*
    3. Lack of regular activity*
    4. Age
    5. Gender
    6. Heredity
  2. Know your numbers
    1. Total cholesterol
    2. HDL cholesterol
    3. Blood Pressure
    4. Blood Sugar
    5. Body Mass Index
  3. Take Action
    1. Manage blood pressure
    2. Control cholesterol
    3. Reduce blood sugar
    4. Get active
    5. Eat better
    6. Lose weight
    7. Stop smoking

If you would like to find out more information on each of the areas above, you can visit GoRedforWomen.org  On their site you can take a risk factors quiz and learn more about the warning signs of a heart attack and stroke.

I hope to see lots of RED tomorrow.

 

Sources:

https://www.goredforwomen.org/get-involved/national-wear-red-day/national-wear-red-day/

https://www.goredforwomen.org/fight-heart-disease-women-go-red-women-official-site/know-your-risk/

https://healthfinder.gov/NHO/FebruaryToolkit.aspx

 

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

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jackfruit-452532_1920

Jackfruit is a large tree fruit native to Asian countries, and it has long been a staple food in South and Southeast Asia. In America, unripe jack fruit seems to be the next big thing, especially in the vegan cooking world! In 2016, using jackfruit as a healthful stand-in for meat was the most popular food and beverage trend on Pinterest. Jackfruit flesh is starchy and fibrous with a consistency much like cooked meat, allowing it shred easily and stand in as a meat-free taco filling or a meatless pulled “pork” sandwich. Like other starches, jackfruit can be cooked with the flavors you want it to take on, making it a good meat substitute in BBQ, Mexican, teriyaki and curry dishes.

canned-jackfruitCanned jackfruit is easiest to work when preparing recipes such as BBQ Jackfruit. Canned jackfruit is commonly sold in Asian grocery stores, although some chains in the U.S. such as Whole Foods and Wegman’s are starting to carry it, and more will likely follow suit if its trendiness continues! Look for canned jackfruit packed in water or brine (as opposed to syrup), and rinse before using it in recipes.

If you can’t find canned jackfruit and want to try fresh, look for unripe fruit that is not yet fragrant and still firm. Be prepared to deal with stickiness and mess, as jackfruit contains a sap that adheres to knives, cutting boards and hands. Additionally, fresh jackfruit is large and cumbersome: it typically weighs between five and thirty pounds, although a single fruit can weigh up to 100 pounds and grow up to three feet long! Instructions for cutting and handling fresh jackfruit are available here.

jackfruit

Jackfruit has many nutritional benefits: it contains fiber, protein, Vitamins A and C, iron, calcium and other essential minerals such as copper, manganese, magnesium and potassium. Additionally, jackfruit is fat, cholesterol and sodium free, making it a suitable meat alternative for those watching their heart health!

Will you take part in this food trend and try jackfruit in 2017? If so, leave a comment below letting us know what you plan to do!

 

Author: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewer: Marilyn Rabe,  Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

 

Sources:

Bowers, K. (2016). The Ultimate BBQ Jackfruit Pulled Pork Recipe. Organic Authority. http://www.organicauthority.com/how-to-make-the-ultimate-bbq-jackfruit-pulled-pork/.

Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies (2016). BBQ Jackfruit. http://nutritionstudies.org/recipes/meal/bbq-jackfruit/.

Fruits and Veggies More Matters (2010). Jackfruit: Nutrition, Selection, Storage. http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/jackfruit-nutrition-selection-storage.

Progressive Grocer (2016). Jackfruit Replaces Meat, Buddha Bowls Get Big: 2017 Trends. http://www.progressivegrocer.com/research-data/research-analysis/jackfruit-replaces-meat-buddha-bowls-get-big-2017-trends.

Worley, S. (2016). Everything You Need to Know About Jackfruit, the Latest Miracle Food. Epicurious. http://www.epicurious.com/ingredients/facts-tips-recipe-ideas-jackfruit-vegan-miracle-food-article.

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Join me in Going Red this Friday. I wear red to increase awareness about the dangers of heart disease and to honor my parents. Heart disease is very personal to me as I lost both my parents in their 50’s to this disease. Heart disease continues to be the number 1 killer of men and women in the United States.

Did you know that heart disease and stroke kill 1 in 3 women, yet it’s 80% preventable?

At your next meeting, family gathering or social event, look around you and count the number of women in the room. If there are 21 women in the room, 7 women will die from heart disease and stroke. When I think about an office where 6 women work, realizing that 2 women will die from heart disease and stroke is sobering. What about at our family holiday party where there are 15 women in our immediate family? 5 of us will die from heart disease. These numbers bring it home to many of us. 

What can you do to reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke? These suggestions are not just for women, they are for men, too. The American Heart Association website shares tips to encourage all of us to be heart healthy:
Be Active – aim for 150 minutes of physical activity each week. This can help you lose weight as well as lowering your risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and other health problems. Talk with your health care professional about your activity level before beginning a program. Get their advice and get moving!
Manage your Weight – if you need to lose weight, set goals and begin this journey by adding more vegetables and fruits to your diet. Eating a diet high in fresh vegetables and fruits may help you achieve a healthy weight. Drink water, move more and eat those veggies.
Stop Smoking – if you are a smoker, make this your year! It is never too late to quit. Gather your support and make the change.
Know Your Numbers but Manage Your Risk – According to the American Heart Association, these are the ideal numbers for the general adult population:

Total Cholesterol – less than or equal to 180 mg/dL
Body Mass Index (BMI) of less than or equal to 25 kg/m2
Blood Pressure of less than 120/80 mm/Hg
Fasting Blood Sugar of less than or equal to 100 mg/dL

Show your commitment to living a healthier lifestyle by wearing Red this Friday. Visit  https://www.goredforwomen.org for more information on how you can begin to make positive lifestyle changes.

Do you like to cook? Want some new heart healthy recipes? Check out these heart healthy snacks: https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/heart-healhty-snacks-and-eating-on-thego/heart-healthy-snacks-for-kids/
For fast family dinners, visit: https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/cooking-heart-healthy-for-the-family/fast-family-weeknight-meals/

This is why I will Go Red on Friday.

IMG_0413

Family Photo: Debbie Klinger, sister of author, Brandy Harris, niece of author, and Michelle Treber, author.  Monument photo: my parents monument.

Author: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, Heart of Ohio EERA, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Beth Stefura, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, Crossroads EERA, stefura.2@osu.edu

 

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heart attack

Heart disease is an epidemic as the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports around 715,000 Americans suffer a heart attack each year. While chest pain is recognized as a major heart attack symptom, there are other major symptoms that need to be recognized.

Heart Attack Defined

A heart attack usually occurs when a blood clot blocks the flow of blood through an artery that feeds blood to the heart. This may cause permanent damage to the heart muscle if not treated quickly. The most common cause of heart attacks is atherosclerosis or the buildup of plaque in the arteries. Less commonly, heart attacks can also occur as a result of very low blood pressure, drug use, a tear in the heart artery and small blood clots that travel to the heart from other parts of the body. Understanding the typical and not so obvious symptoms when a heart attack is occurring can be a matter of life and death.

Symptoms of a Heart Attack

• Severe chest pain, pressure or tightness in the middle of the chest that lasts for
more than a few minutes or goes away and then comes back; sometimes mistaken for
heartburn
• Shortness of breath
• Pain that spreads to shoulders, neck, arms or jaw
• Cold sweat or sweating
• Feeling of indigestion, choking or heartburn
• Nausea or vomiting
• Feeling dizzy, light-headed or extremely weak
• Rapid or irregular heart beats

Warning signs for Women

• Sudden onset of weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting,
indigestion, body aches or overall feeling of illness
• Unusual feeling or mild discomfort in the back, chest, arm, neck or jaw without chest
pain
• Sleep disturbance

Always call 911 when you begin to have any symptoms of a heart attack. The key is to listen to your body and seek immediate medical treatment.

Written by: Beth Stefura, M Ed, RD, LD. Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, Crossroads EERA, stefura.2@osu.
Reviewed by: Cynthia R. Shuster, CFLE, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, Buckeye Hills EERA, shuster.24@osu.edu
Reviewed by: Jennifer Lindimore, Office Associate, Ohio State University Extension, Morgan County, Buckeye Hills EERA, lindimore.1@osu.edu

Resources: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/911-Warnings-Signs-of-a-Heart-Attack_UCM_305346_SubHomePage.jsp

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