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Posts Tagged ‘hydration’

fruit infused water

Are you getting enough water? The old hard and fast rule was that you were to drink six to eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day. However, the rule was actually just an estimate and the amount you should be drinking can vary based on gender, weight, activity level and other special considerations. You can check out this article to calculate how much water you should be drinking.

According to the CDC water helps your body:

  • Keep your temperature normal
  • Lubricate and cushion joints
  • Protect your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues
  • Get rid of wastes through urination, perspiration, and bowel movements

They also report that your body needs more water when you are:

  • In hot climates
  • More physically active
  • Running a fever
  • Having diarrhea or vomiting

Do you find yourself struggling to get your water intake in? I grew up with a pitcher of sweet tea in the refrigerator at all times so drinking plain water was very difficult for me. I craved flavor. So I started to infuse my water with fruit. If you are new to fruit infused water you may be taken back by the fact that it’s not sweetened. It’s a little hard on the taste buds at first especially if you are used to drinking sweetened beverages. I would recommend starting with fruit that is already really sweet, like pineapple, to help trick your taste buds since there is no added sugar. Then, as you become accustom to things less sweet you can try and experiment with other flavors. Check out this blog post where another extension educator lists the steps to making infused water and different combinations to try. A couple of my favorites are: lemon water

  • Orange Pineapple – 16 oz water, 4-6 inch pineapple spear, 1 small orange sliced
  • Berry Splash – 16 oz water, 4 raspberries, 2 blackberries, 2 strawberries
  • Grape Pineapple – 16 oz water, 6 grapes and a 3-4 inch pineapple spear

Maybe you infuse your water already. I encourage you to think about what fruits and vegetables are in season where you live and try different combinations. Are you feeling a little more adventurous in your selection? Why not try going gourmet with these flavors:

  • Green Apple Raspberry Rosemary – Sliced apple, whole raspberry and 1 sprig of fresh rosemary
  • Orange Chai Spice – Sliced oranges, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, allspice
  • Vanilla Basil Strawberry – Vanilla bean (remove seeds first), handful fresh basil, 1 cup sliced strawberries
  • Mango Pineapple Mint – Slice of firm-ripe mango, slices of pineapple, handful fresh mint

Make sure to prepare your infused water at least 2 to 3 hours before you plan to drink it to allow time for flavors to blend. Refrigerated infused water can be kept for up to 3 days before drinking. What’s your favorite combination of infused water?

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/nutrition/index.html

http://livesmartohio.osu.edu/food/kendle-4osu-edu/water-with-a-twist/

https://www.umsystem.edu/newscentral/totalrewards/2014/06/19/how-to-calculate-how-much-water-you-should-drink/

http://www.washington.edu/wholeu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Drinks-in-a-Jar5.pdf

http://u.osu.edu/powers-barker.1/2015/07/06/ohio-local-foods-infused-water-experiment/

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Lisa Barlage, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, barlage.7@osu.edu

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tired-hikers-249683_1280During the summer months, it can be difficult to stay calm, cool, and collected as the temperature and humidity rise. It is important to be aware of the ways to keep ourselves safe in the heat. By following safety tips and being proactive, we can avoid serious illness such as heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hyperthermia.

  • Plan ahead. Whether you are swimming, having a cook-out, going the zoo or amusement park, canoeing, hiking, camping, going to the beach, or simply lying in a hammock in your backyard, it is important to be prepared as you are planning for the sun-filled days of summer.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water. Not a water fan?  Add some fruit (fresh or frozen) to your bottle and enjoy the refreshing taste.  Did you know that at most public places (including restaurants, zoos, and theme parks) where fountain beverages are sold, you can usually get a free cup of water?
  • Avoid alcoholic and carbonated beveragesAlcoholic and carbonated beverages will actually dehydrate you, rather than hydrate you.
  • Pack a cooler.  By bringing healthier foods with you and taking time to sit and eat or snack, you are more likely to stop, rest, and refuel your body. Fruits and vegetables are naturally high in water content and will help you stay hydrated. A bonus is that you will help stay within your budget by not purchasing higher priced foods and beverages.
  • Choose your clothing wisely. Loose fitting clothes that are lighter in color will help to keep you cool.
  • Exercise early in the morning or later in the evening. Avoid strenuous activities during the midday hours (10 a.m.- 4 p.m.) when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
  • Stay Sun Safe.  Wear a wide-brimmed hat. Wear sun screen that is at least SPF 15.  Choose sunglasses that block 100% of UVA and UVB rays.
  • Seek shade.  Taking time to find the shady spot or by sitting under a sport or pop-up tent can help to lower your body temperature.

Move to a cool location, sit or lie down, apply cold wet cloths to your body, and sip water if you notice any of the following signs of heat exhaustion:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Weakness,
  • Cold, pale, and clammy skin
  • Changes in pulse
  • Nausea or vomiting (please contact a health professional if vomiting does not stop)
  • Fainting

Enjoy your summer.  Stay cool and safe!

Written by: Jami Dellifield, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Hardin County.

Reviewed by: Lisa Barlage, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ross County.

Sources:

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services https://www.cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning.html

Summer Stress, Safe Tactics for Ag Today, July 2015 Andy Bauer, Ohio AgrAbility Educational Program Coordinator, https://agsafety.osu.edu/newsletter/ag-safety-stat/july-2015/injury-prevention/summer-stress

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services https://www.cdc.gov/media/subtopic/matte/pdf/CDCSummerSafety.pdf

National Institutes of Health, https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/hyperthermia.

Healthy Beverage Guidelines, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-drinks-full-story/

Photo Credits: https://pixabay.com/en/tired-hikers-resting-place-rest-249683/

 

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summer heat

Massive heat waves are hitting parts of the country and breaking records.  June has been a hot month with predictions that the heat will continue throughout the summer.  Summer heat can be dangerous.  The best defense against heat-related illness is prevention.  Staying cool and making simple changes in your fluid intake, activities and clothing during hot weather can help you remain safe and healthy.

Extreme Heat Safety Tips:

  • Never leave a person or a pet in the car in hot conditions while you run to do a quick errand.  People and animals can succumb to heat exposure and death very quickly in a hot car.  Cars can become overheated quickly and when overheated become like ovens.  It’s never safe.
  • Drink more fluids (avoid alcohol and high sugar drinks which can lead to dehydration)
  • Wear light clothing
  • Never leave persons, infants, young children or animals in a closed, parked vehicle
  • During the hottest hours of the day, stay inside.
  • Keep blinds and curtains closed from morning until the late afternoon to block extra direct heat from sunlight.
  • Supervise children during outdoor play, being sure to monitor them closely and frequently.
  • Stay on the lowest level of your home.
  • Use small appliances like slow cookers and tabletop grills instead of ovens and stoves.
  • Verify that seat belts and car seat restraints are not too hot before buckling yourself or anyone else into the car.
  • Go to a cool place.  Air conditioned movie theatres, malls or community centers.
  • Call and check on family, friends and neighbors.
  • Seek medical care right away if you become nauseous, start vomiting or experience cramps.

Protect yourself and your family from exposure to the sun and reduce your risk of sunburn, skin cancer and heat stress.

Source: emergency.cdc.gov

Written by:  Beth Stefura, M Ed, RD,LD.  Ohio State University Extension Educator, Mahoning County, Crossroads EERA, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Joanna Rini, Ohio State University Extension, Medina County, Western Reserve EERA, rini.41@osu.edu. Donna Green, BS, MA, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, Erie Basin EERA, green.308@osu.edu

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As the weather is getting warmer and nicer outside, summer cleaning and yard work are on the to do list. It is exrtremely important to pay attention to your body if you have had a relatively sedentary winter and spring.  Dehydration can occur when as little as 3% body weight is lost in fluids and results in an emergency medical situation. Listen to your body when it says it is tired. Do not push yourself too far and risk injury. To make the most ouf of time, and to treat your body the right way, follow these fluida and food guidelines.

If you are performing strenous activity, regardless if inside or outside, it is important to stay hydrated. With mild hydration, symptoms may include headaches, light headedness, fatigue and of course thirst.  The main way to present deyhydration is to treat it before it even begins. Before you start any yard work, make sure you have a glass of water even if you are not thirsty. This will ensure your body starts with an adequate amount of fluids and can afford to lose some through sweat. If you are in a hot or humid environment, remember to drink fluid at least every 30 minutes or less to maintain your fluid levels.  The longer you are being physically active, the more this is important. You may only neeed one cup per hour, but it depends upon how much you are sweating and how hot/humid it is.  It may be hard to remember to drink something, but make it a priority to stop for a couple seconds and have a sip of your drink. After you finish your cleaning projects, try to have some more fluids to replace any that you lost. Just about any beverage can be used including water, lemonade, or sports drinks. Try to avoid any drinks with caffeine. Caffeine acts as a diuretic and increases fluid loss through the urine.

Beyond fluids, energy is needed to perform work. Try to have a nice meal before you begin working to provide your body with calories. A light meal can be used to prevent any stomach or GI problems. It just needs to have some carbohydrates (your main source of energy) and a little protein to repair your muscles. If you will be physically active for more than one hour, it may be necessary to have a snack while you work. This can be very small and can be as little as 100 calories or less. Some snack ideas are a granola bar, string cheese, yogurt, crackers and peanut butter or a piece of fruit. This snack will give your body some extra calories so you don’t fatigue as fast.

The best way to be prepared for your summer cleaning is to fuel up before you begin. Ensuring you are at adequate fluid levels, and have eaten within the last couple hours will help you to last longer. Also, don’t force yourself too far. It is the beginning of a long summer and you don’t need to start with an injury. By listening to your body, you can prevent dehydration, have more energy for your muscles and prevent injuries.

Writter: Susan Zies, Ohio State Univeristy Extension, Family & Consumer Sciences Educator, Wood County.

Information gathered from:

Mayo Clinic. (August 2, 2011). Dehydration: Symptoms. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dehydration/DS00561/DSECTION=symptoms

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