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Posts Tagged ‘Living Well’

When was the last time you paid attention to something you ate?

That might seem like a silly question, but all too often, we rush through our meals and snacks without stopping to think about what we’re doing: how our food looks, smells and tastes. I have to admit, even as a dietitian and food educator, I am just as guilty as the next person! I often eat lunch at my desk while working, since my office does not have a formal break room or lunch hour. Consequently, because my mind is focused on tasks other than eating, I consume my lunch without noticing its taste, appearance or texture.

pasta-salad-1967501_1920One day while eating lunch at my desk, though, I was struck by the saltiness of an olive in a bite that I took of Mediterranean pasta salad. The taste caused me to pause, eat my lunch one bite at a time, and pay more attention to the dish. In this instance, I was practicing mindful eating.

Mindful eating is a form of mindfulness, which is the practice of paying attention in the present moment without judgement. Mindful eating is the practice of being more aware of your eating habits, the sensations you experience as you eat (tastes, smells, textures, etc.) and the thoughts and emotions you have about your food. When you eat mindfully, you:

  • Use all your senses
  • Acknowledge your responses to food (i.e. like, dislike or neutral) without judgement
  • Become aware of hunger and satiety (fullness) cues

When you practice mindful eating, you allow yourself to choose to eat food that is both satisfying and nourishing to your body. And, not only do mindful eaters tend to enjoy their food more than distracted eaters; research suggests that mindful eating can help with weight control and also steer people away from processed food and other less-healthful food choices. The underlying premise here is that it takes approximately 20 minutes for the brain to catch up with the stomach and register fullness after eating, so slowing down your eating may help you to realize when you’re full before you overeat.

If you tend to eat too quickly and need some strategies to slow down, try: cutlery-908480_1280

  • Eating with your non-dominant hand
  • Putting your fork down between bites
  • Taking a sip of water between each bite
  • Using chopsticks if you don’t normally use them
  • Putting away cell phones and other electronic devices
  • Practicing gratitude for your food as you think about where it came from and all the people who worked to bring it to you
  • Eating with others and having a conversation over your meal

 

Sources:

Carter, S. (2013). Mindful Eating. Live Healthy, Live Well blog. https://livehealthyosu.com/2013/10/21/mindful-eating/

Harvard Health Letter (2011). Mindful Eating. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/mindful-eating

University of New Hampshire, Office of Health Education and Promotion. Mindful Eating. https://www.unh.edu/health/ohep/nutrition/mindful-eating

 

Written by: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Shannon Carter, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County

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“Raising Kids, Eating Right, Spending Smart, Living Well” is the theme of a national Living Well campaign being promoted by Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators, both at the national level and here in Ohio. The goal of the Living Well Campaign is to provide people with the education and information they need in order to “Live Well.”

In Ohio Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators work through Ohio State University Extension to offer all kinds of information that will help families achieve a positive, healthy lifestyle. Whether you are working to improve your health through eating heart healthy meals, saving money for a vacation or nest egg, or looking for a babysitter class for your teen – Extension can likely help you. March is National Extension Living Well Month and 2014 is the 100th Year of Extension – so it’s a great time to get better acquainted with Ohio State University Extension. Visit OSU Extension online at http://extension.osu.edu/ or National Extension information is gathered at http://www.extension.org/. This site is an interactive home for research based information from Universities across the nation.

100 yr logoCooperative Extension is the partnership that began in 1914 with the United States Congress passing of The Smith Lever Act. County, state and federal governments agreed that by joining together they could provide citizens with access to the wealth of knowledge generated by public universities. Many outstanding Universities across the country house Extension including: Rutgers, Clemson, Purdue, Nebraska, our beloved Ohio State University, and many more. If you enjoy Facebook, the Extension 100 Years page has interesting information about the history of Extension and programming offered today as well https://www.facebook.com/Extension100Years.

In recognition of the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (NEAFCS), the Ohio Live Healthy Live Well team is sponsoring a “blog” contest.  Please share your “personal story” as to how you have benefited from the Cooperative Extension Service.  By sharing your story, you will be entered into a drawing to win your own personal copy of our NEAFCS Living Well™ More Than a Cookbook.  Please send your personal story to barlage.7@osu.edu by March 24, 2014.  The entrant of the winning entry will be notified via email.

The NEAFCS Living Well™ More Than a Cookbook answers your questions with research-based information for Living Well with practical tips.

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Cindy Shuster, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County.

Source: Live Healthy Live Well Blog, C. Shuster, March 8, 2012, http://wp.me/p1cmn2-nM.

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We all love a cold refreshing drink with a meal, after physical activity or as a snack.  Sodas, sweet tea, energy drinks and other sugary drinks taste great; yet contain a lot of calories and no nutrients.  What you drink makes an impact on your health.  Do we stop and think about how much sugar we drink daily?  Do we really want to drink these extra calories daily?

Americans consume 200 to 300 more calories each day than we did 20 years ago.  Nearly 50% of this increased calorie consumption is from sugar-sweetened beverages, Drinking one soda a day can equal an extra 25 pounds per year.

Sodas are getting bigger.  Super-sized sodas can be as large as 4-5 regular cans.

  • 20 oz. soda contains 17 teaspoons of sugar
  • 16 oz. Iced Mocha contains 14 teaspoons of sugar
  • 16 oz. Apple Juice contains 13 teaspoons of sugar
  • 20 oz. Sports Drink contains 12 teaspoons of sugar
  • Water contains 0 teaspoons of sugar

Next time you pour yourself a drink, don’t pour on the pounds!  Drink plenty of water and add cut up fresh fruit for added flavor.  If you drink juice, add some water or seltzer to cut calories and sugars.  Skip sports or energy drinks and choose water.  This will quench your thirst.  Read labels and menu boards to learn how many calories and sugars are in your favorite drinks.

Written by:  Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension

Sources:  nyc.gov/health

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Raising kids, eating right, spending smart, living well – that’s the theme of a national Living Well campaign being promoted by Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators, both at the national level and here in Ohio. The goal of the Living Well Campaign is to provide people with the education and information they need in order to “live well.”

OSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences Educators work through Ohio State University Extension to offer all kinds of information that will help families achieve a positive, healthy lifestyle. Whether you are trying to lose weight through meal planning and exercise, save money for retirement, or balance work and family responsibilities, Extension probably has the answer.

March 11-17 is National Extension Living Well Week, and it’s a good time to get better acquainted with your local Extension office. Visit OSU Extension online at http://extension.osu.edu/ to learn more.

In recognition of the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (NEAFCS), the Ohio Live Healthy, Live Well team is sponsoring a “blog” contest.  Please share your “personal story” as to how you have benefitted from the Cooperative Extension Service.  By sharing your story, you will be entered into a drawing to win your own personal copy of our NEAFCS Living Well More Than a Cookbook.  Please send your personal story to shuster.24@osu.edu by 12 a.m. EST, March 18th.  The entrant of the winning entry will be notified via email during the week of March 19.

The NEAFCS Living Well More Than a Cookbook answers your questions with research-based information for Living Well with practical tips. The first section, Recipes for Living, includes the following:

  • Healthy Lifestyles
  • Living Green
  • Home Safety
  • Financial Management
  • Care of Textiles
  • Etiquette

Living Well offers you a world of adventure in food from across the United States including recipes for planning a party or feeding the family.

— Thinking of a Western barbeque – check out Montana’s Big Sky Elk Roast or Nebraska’s Cucumber Ranch Steak with Alabama’s Fried Green Tomatoes and Missouri’s Blackberry Cobbler.

— Enjoy a Seafood Feast with Maryland’s Crab Cakes or Connecticut’s Clam Chowder topped off with Maine’s Wild Blueberry Gingerbread or Indiana’s Sugar Cream Pie.

— Summer Picnics won’t be the same once you serve Hawaii’s Chicken Lu’au, Nevada’s Pine Nut Salad, Mississippi’s Grilled Sweet Potatoes, or Georgia’s Peach Crumble.

You’ll find recipes from all 50 states and family favorites from Family and Consumer Science Educators. Members of the National Association of Family and Consumer Sciences deliver nutritional information, food safety tips, preparation suggestions and recipes for Living Well.

Writer: Cindy Shuster, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension.

OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability, religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status.

Keith L. Smith, Associate Vice President for Agricultural Administration and Director, OSU Extension TDD No. 800-589-8292 (Ohio only) or 614-292-1868

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