Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Mindfulness’

Fall is a beautiful time of year to get out and enjoy all the sights, colors, and sounds of nature. All of this can be a treat for our senses. Connecting to your senses can be a simple way to reduce stress. Tapping into all five senses can immediately provide calming and healing powers.  Incorporate one of these sensory experiences into your day and enjoy finding something new about fall to love:

people walking in woods

Vision:

Have a scavenger hunt: look for items found in the woods or at a park, in your neighborhood, or stay in your own backyard.

Create some art: make a nature rubbing with paper and crayons. Collect interesting items such as bark or leaves and place them under the paper and rub them on top with a crayon.  Consider placing interesting leaves in a bowl or vase and enjoying for the season or arranging them in a frame.

Smell:

Pay attention to the new smells that come with the season. Bring your attention to the grass, flowers, and air of fall. Notice the difference between a sunny and rainy day and talk about these with your children or grandchildren noting the differences they perceive.

Taste:

Fall offers a variety of new taste experiences, including pumpkin, cinnamon, and more. Pay attention to how these seasonal flavors make you feel.

Touch:

Fall can provide new and exciting textures to explore. Grasses have different and new textures as the season changes. Acorns, leaves, bark, moss, pinecones, feathers, and more can all have interesting textures to explore.

Sound:

Crunching leaves, new bird sounds, and others can contribute to the exciting sounds of fall. Take some time to simply sit and observe the unique sounds of the season.

Try taking a sensory walk incorporating all these senses and enjoy the multi-sensory benefits of fall. Using all our senses to explore a new season can greatly enhance the experience of fall and provide fall memories that last!

Written by: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Miami County.

Reviewed by: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension.

Resources:

Globokar, L. (2020, November 27). Learn how reconnecting with your senses helps you to manage stress. Forbes. Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.forbes.com/sites/lidijaglobokar/2020/11/30/learn-how-reconnecting-with-your-senses-helps-you-to-manage-stress/?sh=32696bec1544

Whitney-Coulter, A. (2022, January 26). Use your five senses to connect with nature. Mindful. Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.mindful.org/sense-the-benefits-of-nature/

Read Full Post »

I’ve always been curious about the outdoors but never really thought about how or what I do when I’m outside, until recently when a friend asked me, “How do you do nature?”  What a great question! It’s sometimes hard to know what to do when something is new or there is a shift in perspective, so here is a quick guide that will help get you started.

Before you get started here are a few things to keep in mind…first, it does not matter where you live…city country, or in an alleyway…nature IS all around us…if we just stop and notice.  Second, don’t overthink it. Just get out before you change your mind!  Stepping outside into your backyard might be a great place to start and when ready consider going to an Ohio park. Have the courage to turn off the TV and other devices and just go outside. Begin where you feel comfortable…for me it was in my own yard and only took a few minutes, so this does not have to be time consuming unless you want it to be. 

Once outside, you might be asking yourself “What do I do now?” Here are three simple ideas and a place to start:

blue skies, looking up at pine trees
Source: Gallup, S., March 29
  1. LOOK UP. As simple as this sounds…just look up. What do you see? Are you under the trees? Or the clouds?  As you look up, your thoughts begin to slow down, and you may begin to notice things you have not seen before.
  2. LOOK DOWN. What is under your feet? Mud? Grass? Tiny flowers?  Notice how you feel in this moment. Do you feel like sitting? Did you see something you wanted to take a closer look at? It is always amazing to me to see flowers or grass growing out of tiny little cracks in rock or concrete!
  3. LISTEN.  Stop and listen. What do you hear? Birds? Wind? Cars? Is it quiet?  Our senses come alive when we take the time to be still and we notice is amazing.   
Grass with single purple flower

Going into nature might feel a little awkward, but it gets easier the more you go out. For example, I started in my backyard and now this season I have walked the same path each day with my dog. We walk under the pines near the hospital and factories (in the city). I walked that path about 100 times and then one day, suddenly, I noticed that the pine trees I was walking under were all different!! It was a moment of awe and amazement for me!  From there my mind became more curious and found myself in nature more often, craving what few tend to stop and notice.  

I hope you find your way into nature.  Remember…don’t overthink it…just go! And remember to slow down, look up, look down, listen and look all around.

References:

Gallup. S.L. (2021). Falling In Love with Nature. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/05/19/falling-in-love-with-nature/

Stanton, L. M. (2021). Get Out! Celebrate Nature on Earth Day and Every Day. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/04/19/get-out-celebrate-nature-on-earth-day-and-every-day

Written by:  Shari Gallup, MS., Assistant Professor, Family and Consumer Science Educator, Licking County, Ohio. Gallup.1@osu.edu.

Reviewed by:  Laura M. Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Warren County, stanton.60.osu.edu

Read Full Post »

Based on the title of my blog, you might think it’s focused on yoga, tai chi, or some other form of gentle movement often associated with mindfulness. While all of these can be beneficial, mindful movement can include much more.

As a runner, I have struggled with an Achilles tendon injury for years. There have been times when I had to forego running altogether for several months at a time. After diligently doing things to heal, I have been able to resume running. When I have had to take breaks, I had to remind myself to start slowly and to gradually increase my distance. This is not and has not been easy. I have re-injured myself from going too far too soon and from not being mindful when moving my body. I have been back to running for a couple years with little trouble, though I must constantly remind myself to be mindful while running.

I recently started training for a marathon, a bucket list item before I reach the ½ century mark later this year. Even though I have a training plan/schedule, I also have to be flexible and listen to my body, particularly my left foot/heel as I am increasing my distance. I am keenly aware of how my usual state feels and when I notice it becoming altered, I must stop running and walk for a bit to give my muscles and my heel a rest from the repetitive running movement. I do this so I do not re-injure myself due to poor body mechanics. By being mindful of my stride length, of how and at what point my foot hits the ground, of the terrain, of my posture, and of my pace, I can continue running injury free.

Another part of mindful movement is paying attention to or noticing what’s happening around you at any given moment. Since I run primarily on the road, paying attention always, is imperative. By staying in the present moment, I am more aware of potential hazards, like holes in the road, icy patches, and speeding or distracted drivers. I also get to take in more of the scenery and beauty of the terrain. There is nothing better than running up a hill and then pausing to take in the view before heading down the other side. I notice different sounds, like cars in the distance or the wind picking up as it blows across the fields or through the trees and finally on me.

You may be thinking, yeah, yeah, yeah, so what does this have to do with mindful movement? Well, mindful movement can be practiced ANYTIME you are moving!

Here are three easy steps to practice moving mindfully:

1.            Notice what is happening in the body.

2.            Recognize what is on your mind – notice troublesome thoughts we cannot stop. Recognize habitual patterns.

3.            Accept that feelings and thoughts are impermanent and just passing through. Allow them to be in the space you are noticing. Allow yourself to feel what you feel.

If you find resistance – just notice how that feels with a sense of kindness to yourself. Breathe into the blockage or difficulty with a sense of softness.

If your mobility is limited, notice what movements you can do with ease. Try to capitalize on movements that are OK for you, even circling your arms, hands, or feet, or flexing the wrists. Allowing, acceptance and kindness are key to any mindfulness practice, still or moving, sitting, laying down or standing.

How do you move mindfully?

Written by Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Perry County

Reviewed by Jami Dellifield, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Hardin County

Sources

Calechman, S., Bradley, C., Graham, L., Staff, M., Pratt, M., & Lagunju, O. (2022, February 4). Getting started with Mindful Movement. Mindful. Retrieved February 18, 2022, from https://www.mindful.org/getting-started-with-mindful-movement

Calechman, S., Bradley, C., Graham, L., Staff, M., Pratt, M., & Lagunju, O. (2022, February 4). Getting started with Mindful Movement. Mindful. Retrieved February 18, 2022, from https://www.mindful.org/getting-started-with-mindful-movement/

Dreskin, M., Smith, S., & Kane, D. (Eds.). (n.d.). The benefits of Mindful Movement. What Is Mindful Movement and What Are Its Benefits? | Mental Health & Wellness | Kaiser Permanente. Retrieved February 18, 2022, from https://healthy.kaiserpermanente.org/health-wellness/mental-health/tools-resources/mind-body-wellness/movement-benefits

Renner, B. (2019, February 13). Mindfulness meditation too boring? try mindful movement to shed stress, anxiety. Study Finds. Retrieved February 18, 2022, from https://www.studyfinds.org/mindfulness-meditation-mindful-movement-stress-anxiety/

Seery, J. (2022, January 31). Mindful movement. Mindfulness Association. Retrieved February 18, 2022, from https://www.mindfulnessassociation.net/weekly-challenge/mindful-movement/

Work Well NYC. (n.d.). Improving Mind-Body Wellness Through Mindful Movement. https://www1.nyc.gov/site/olr/wellness/wellnesshome.page. Retrieved February 17, 2022, from https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/olr/downloads/pdf/wellness/improvingmindbodywellnessthroughmindfulmovement.pdf

Read Full Post »

Three young people standing outside, one looking through binoculars and one pointing

Recently, I met an 11-year-old who likes birds. Since I self-identify as a bird nerd, we started talking and I quickly realized this young person had a genuine curiosity and passion for birds. She told me she had checked out Smithsonian Handbooks: Birds of North America from her school library and had no intention of returning it.

As a parent of teenagers, I struggle to get my kids off screens and out in nature, despite my constant reminders about the health benefits of getting outdoors. Here was a young person who wanted to get outside, so we made plans to go birding together.

And birding we did. The two of us spent 5 hours out in the cold on a gloomy, gray day and we had a blast. She brought (and I carried) the large, heavy Smithsonian library book with her. When we spotted a bird, she knew exactly where to find it in the book.

It was delightful to bird with a young person who was excited and engaged. I look forward to birding with her and other young people in the future. After spending time with a young birder, it became clear to me why we should take young birders under our wing:

  • They are connecting with nature: Our young people are disconnected from the natural world. Studies found that 8- to 12-years-old spend 4 to 6 hours on screens every day, while teens spend up to 9 hours. Time spent on screens almost always equates to time spent indoors, disconnected from nature.
  • They can showcase their strengths: Birdability is a non-profit organization that “ensures that birding truly is for everybody and every body, regardless of disability or other health concerns.” Their blog has stories from birders who are autistic, color-blind, hearing-impaired, and mobility-challenged. One young birder described her ADHD as her birding superpower since she saw and heard so many details around her!
  • They benefit from Vitamin N (Nature): There are decades of research that show the positive impact that spending time outdoors has on our mental and physical health. Nature has unique health benefits to young people, especially when it comes to kids with ADHD, allergies, asthma, weight issues, and mental health challenges.
  • They are becoming environmental stewards: Children who spend time in nature are more likely to feel connected to nature as adults, and therefore, more likely to care for and protect the natural world.

After our birding outing, I purchased my new birding buddy her own copy of the Smithsonian Handbook. I am selfishly hoping the returned library book will inspire another young birder at her school. I also added a Birds of Ohio Field Guide to her collection so the next time we’re out birding, neither of us has to lug a 752-page handbook.

Additional Birding Resources:
To find more information about birds and birding, please visit: go.osu.edu/nature-matters-birds

25th Annual Great Backyard Bird Count photo

Written by Laura M. Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Warren County, stanton.60.osu.edu

Reviewed by Shari Gallup, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Licking County, gallup.1@osu.edu

Photo Credit: Kindel Media from Pexels

References:

Alsop, F. J. (2001). Smithsonian Handbooks: Birds of North America: Eastern Region. New York, NY: DK Publishing.

Wells, N. M. & Lekies, K. S. (2006). Nature and the Life Course: Pathways from Childhood Nature Experiences to Adult Environmentalism. Children, Youth and Environments, 16(1), 1–24. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.16.1.0001

Louv, R. (2008). Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

Scripps Health. (2022, January 10). Do Your Kids Spend Too Much Time in Front of a Screen? https://www.scripps.org/news_items/4688-do-your-kids-spend-too-much-time-in-front-of-a-screen

Stanton, L. M. (2021, February 11). Benefits of Being a Bird Nerd. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/02/11/benefits-of-being-a-bird-nerd

Stanton, L. M. (2021, April 19). Get Out! Celebrate Nature on Earth Day and Every Day. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/04/19/get-out-celebrate-nature-on-earth-day-and-every-day

Stanton, L. M. (2021, November 30). Wonder and Wander in Nature this Winter. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/11/30/wonder-and-wander-in-nature-this-winter

Tekiela, S. (2020). Birds of Ohio Field Guide. Cambridge, MN: Adventure Publications.

Read Full Post »

A nice hot cup of tea can be so soothing on a cold winter day. When is the last time you enjoyed some tea? Can you remember a time when you enjoyed tea with a close friend or family member? I have a dear friend who just passed away after a two-year battle with cancer. We would enjoy many a conversation over a soothing cup of tea. Tea also reminds me of my grandmother. I used to watch as she put a little milk in her tea, and I loved to see the milk swirl as it dissipated in the tea.

Did you know tea can help us improve our health and wellness?

Tea has many health benefits. Specifically, it has been associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. The substances in tea we have to thank for these health benefits are a type of nutrient called flavonoids. More specifically, the particular type of flavonoids found in tea are catechins. Catechins can do some amazing things like improve the function of our blood vessels and reduce the initial development of cancerous cells. While all kinds of tea contain catechins, green tea has three times more than oolong or black tea. For more information on how tea can benefit your health, check out this article from North Dakota State University Extension.

In addition to its physical health benefits, you can use the experience of drinking tea to practice mindfulness. Mindfulness can be practiced by paying attention to something in the present moment, and you can bring attention to something as simple as brewing and drinking a cup of tea. Using your senses is a great way to practice mindfulness. For example, with just one sip of tea you could:

Smell the tea before you brew it, whether you use a tea kettle or the microwave.

Watch the steam curl in the air as it rises from the cup.

Feel the warm cup in your hands.

Taste and savor the flavor of the tea as you sip it.

Feel the hot liquid as it travels down your esophagus.

Try that with a few more sips. Then, during your next cup of tea, expand your practice a little more.

For more details on how to practice mindfulness with a cup of tea, this article has great tips.

Whether you drink tea by yourself or with a loved one, take a moment to think about the benefits you are bringing to your mind and body. Maybe this new mindfulness practice could be ‘your cup of tea.’

Written by Shannon Carter, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Fairfield County

Reviewed by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Sources:

Garden-Robinson, J. “Take Time for Tea: For Health and Well-being” (FN1328, Reviewed July 2021). North Dakota State University Extension. https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/publications/food-nutrition/take-time-for-tea-for-health-and-well-being

Halliwell, E. “How to Be Mindful with a Cup of Tea” (Nov 2016) Excerpted from Into the Heart of Mindfulness. https://www.mindful.org/mindful-cup-tea/

Powers-Barker, P. “Introduction to Mindfulness” (HYG-5243, May 2016). Ohio State University Extension. https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/hyg-5243

Read Full Post »

If you choose not to find joy in the snow, you will have less joy in your life but still the same amount of snow. This quote by an unknown author is like the Midwest winter version of Jon Kabat-Zinn’s quote about a beautiful day at the ocean: you can’t stop the waves but you can learn to surf. We cannot control the immediate, outside weather, but as Dr. Roseanne Scammahorn points out, we can control our personal, internal weather of how we think about and react to external situations.  

In Ohio, we might have snow, rain, ice, or we might have a bright, clear day. Across the state, all these different situations might be true right now. You do not have to love snow (or ice or rain), but if you take the time to bring up a favorite memory or a current moment to notice the sparkle or freshness, you can add a note of gratefulness to your day for all the seasons throughout the year.

If you’re looking for a short break from working on the computer, take one and half minutes to enjoy an online snow globe or a minute to draw and watch your iceberg float at Iceberger. If you’re staying inside, grab some colored pencils and print a copy of winter coloring pages like mittens or winter birds. If coloring is not your cup of tea, make your plans now to slow down and enjoy a warm cup of tea, cocoa, or coffee.

We wish you comfort and joy all through the year, and we also acknowledge that the wintertime can sometimes be difficult. If you need any resources related to SAD (seasonal affective disorder) or other seasonal challenges, please find the best support for your situation. If you find yourself – or a loved one – struggling, please use local support or call the Ohio CareLine at 1-800-720-9616.  Ohio’s CareLine is free, anonymous, open 24/7, and staffed with licensed behavioral health professionals.

What brings you comfort or joy? Jot down a list and then do more of it! This list of Mindfulness Ideas and Activities was collected by the OSU Mindful Wellness team and can be used as an idea-starter for your practice.  If you’d like to follow a recorded mindfulness practice, we recommend the links at the Wexner Medical Center.

Bundle up and head outdoors!  Use all your senses as you walk. Use this Live Healthy Live Well blog on Wonder and Wander in Nature this Winter for ideas. For more information on the value of nature in our lives, including articles and infographics, visit Nature Matters.

If you choose not to find joy in the snow, you will have less joy in your life but still the same amount of snow. How are you finding your joy this winter season?

Written by: Patrice Powers-Barker, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Lucas County

Reviewed by:  Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Franklin County, and Pat Holmes, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Montgomery County

Photo Credit: Melinda Hill, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Wayne County

Sources:

Dellifield, J. (01/12/17). Beating the winter blues. Live Healthy Live Well https://livehealthyosu.com/2017/01/12/beating-the-winter-blues-2/ 

Lobb, J. (01/07/21). Opt outside to beat the winter blues. Live Healthy Live Well. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/01/07/opt-outside-to-beat-the-winter-blues/ 

McCallum, K. (07/14/21). Can weather affect your mood? Houston Methodist. https://www.houstonmethodist.org/blog/articles/2021/jul/can-weather-affect-your-mood/

Scammahorn, R. (01/18/22). You control your own weather. Live Healthy Live Well https://livehealthyosu.com/2022/01/18/you-control-your-own-weather/

Seasonal Affective Disorder. Mayo Clinic https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/seasonal-affective-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20364651

Stanton, L. (11/30/21). Wonder and wander in nature this winter. Live Healthy Live Well https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/11/30/wonder-and-wander-in-nature-this-winter/

Stanton, L. (n.d.). Nature Matters. OSU Extension, Warren County. https://warren.osu.edu/program-areas/family-and-consumer-sciences/healthy-people/nature-matters

Read Full Post »

Each year I select a word for the upcoming year. It isn’t something I do lightly. I spend time considering what I want to focus my intentions on for the upcoming year. Instead of making numerous New Year resolutions, use this word to set goals or intentions in each area of your life. They can all circle back to your word.

Here are some real-life examples of my journeys this year. One journey this year includes physical wellness. With hip replacement surgery this summer, I truly appreciate the complexities of the body and how important this journey of physical activity and wellness. Physical activity helps all of us. It is a stress reliever and can help you strengthen both your body and mind. If you are new to movement, start slowly and add activity to your day. Not sure you are ready to move more? Check out this website for reasons to get started.  

Another journey for me has been my emotional and mental health. I’m working on emotional wellness by reducing stress, counseling, and practicing mindfulness. Writing in my gratitude journal helps me appreciate life so much more. This simple practice can improve your health and happiness.

The final journey I’ll share is my transition from work life to retirement. I’ve worked since I was 5 years old. My first work memory was my dad asking me to fill the pop cooler at our little grocery store, Treber Grocery. I worked there until we sold the store after my dad’s death when I was 17 years old. This early work experience taught me the value of hard work, customer service and taking care of people. That philosophy has sustained me throughout my work career. I have tried to emulate some of my words of the year: strength, kindness, and balance. As I shift towards retirement or “rewirement” I know that this will be another journey – more free time, fewer work demands and reduced work stress. More time for personal reflection, travel and creative expression to name a few!

The National Institutes of Health has several Wellness Toolkits to help you get started on your Wellness Journey. What are you waiting for?

Your Journey awaits! Feel free to share in our comments about your wellness journey.

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Susan Zies, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

Read Full Post »

October is emotional wellness month!  What exactly is emotional wellness?  Emotional wellness encompasses the feeling of happiness and success. It is learning how to deal with the ups and down of life, coping with challenges and having control of your life and a sense of purpose.  When you are emotionally well you function more effectively in your workplace, community, and in relationships. 

Mental Health America (MHA) reports that over 40 million Americans suffer from at least one mental health problem.  Prolonged untreated mental health problems may lead to more severe psychological and physical health conditions such as: insomnia, hypertension, headaches, shortness of breath, impulsivity, and muscle aches.  Mindfulness, along with a healthy lifestyle, and stress management can help you deal with mental health problems.  Treatment can include medication along with healthy habits, yoga, meditation, and counseling.

Make your life better by establishing healthy habits. To encourage holistic health, focus on healthy habits which make you feel good!

  • Mindfulness:  Be mindful, focus on the specific moment you are in.
  • Journaling:  Write down your joys.
  • Meditate/Yoga
  • Laugh!  Laughing releases, the happy juice — endorphins. With endorphins surging through our bloodstream, we’re more apt to feel happy and relaxed. With each laugh, therefore, we’re relieving stress, reducing anxiety, and increasing our stores of personal energy.
  • Say “NO” without guilt.  Learning to set boundaries and spending time for yourself is imperative for self-care.
  • Read Books
  • Seek therapy
  • Communicate with others your feelings and needs.
  • Focus on the good.

American Psychological Association, (2018) Stress Effects on the Body. https://www.apa.org/topics/stress/body

Miller, K. (2020). 14 Health Benefits of Practicing Gratitude According to Science.  Positive Psychology. https://positivepsychology.com/benefits-of-gratitude/

Powers-Barker, P., (2016).  Introduction to Mindfulness.  Ohioline: Ohio State University Extension. https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/hyg-5243

Written by:  Kellie Lemly M.Ed., Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Champaign County, lemly.2@osu.edu

Reviewer: Roseanne Scammahorn, Ph.D. Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Darke County, scammahron.5@osu.edu

Read Full Post »

On Saturday, I rushed through the kitchen and announced to my household: “Don’t follow my example. I’m trying to do too many things at once but here’s what I need you to do ….”  Some of the tasks I was trying to accomplish were putting groceries away in the refrigerator, reminding the kiddos what to get ready so we could leave for an event, and I needed to return a text with timely information. I thought I might have pulled it off until the next morning. Three food items that should have gone in the refrigerator were still sitting in the grocery bag on the counter. Ugh! I hate that I wasted time and money on food that was planned for the week.

Before I blame this pressure to multitask on modern expectations, the following quote is attributed to Mozart (1756 – 1791): The shorter way to do many things is to only do one thing at a time. The temptation to multitask is strong but the hidden costs of multitasking can build up. While we might feel like we are getting a few things done at once, research has shown that our brain is switching between the tasks and has to constantly re-focus on each new task. The challenge is “even though multitasking is wildly inefficient, it feels productive”.

“I’m trying to do too many things at once”. The next time that thought pops into my brain, or the words come out of my mouth, what can I do? I can take a mindful pause. It will not “waste” any time to pause, take a few deep breaths or even do a one-to-three-minute mindfulness practice. The immediate, rushed pressure of the moment will diminish. It will be easier for my brain to determine the order of the tasks or if I can delegate a task or if I can save a task until another time. Don’t follow my example when I’m trying to rush and multitask. Go ahead and follow my example when I take a pause, decide what needs to be done first and then do one thing at a time. 

Sources:

Carter, C. (2020). Three ways to help your kids succeed at distance learning: How can parents support their children at the start of an uncertain school year?. Greater Good Science Center. Berkeley University of California. https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/three_ways_to_help_your_kids_succeed_at_distance_learning

Guided Meditations. UCLA Health. https://www.uclahealth.org/marc/mindful-meditations#english

Harmon, M. (2019). Accomplish MORE in LESS Time. Live Healthy Live Well Blog. Found at:  https://livehealthyosu.com/2019/03/28/accomplish-more-in-less-time/

Levy, D., Wobbrock, J., Kaszniak, A., & Ostergren, M. (2012). The effects of mindfulness meditation training on multitasking in a high-stress information environment. Graphics Interface Conference.  

Powell S. K. (2016). Mindfulness, Multitasking, and You. Professional case management21(2), 61–62. https://doi.org/10.1097/NCM.0000000000000141     https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26844712/

Wang, Z., & Tchernev, J. (2012). The “myth” of media multitasking: Reciprocal dynamics of media multitasking, personal needs, and gratifications. Journal of Communication 62 (2012) 493–513 © 2012 International Communication Association

Written by: Patrice Powers-Barker, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Lucas County

Reviewed by: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Perry County

Photo by Maria Lin Kim on Unsplash

Read Full Post »

Celebrating the 4th of July reminds us that we are amid the middle of Summer.   The warm weather and sunny days are a perfect time to think about improving our self-care.  Take a little extra care of yourself and change up your routine to enjoy all this season has to offer.  Here are some suggestions to help you get started, get outside, and enjoy the sunshine:

  • Abandon the couch and relax outdoors.  Take a blanket or lawn chair and something to read and set up a retreat to enjoy being outdoors on a beautiful sunny day!
  • Take a walk. A walk is a great way to clear your head and enjoy a warm summer afternoon.  Invite a friend and get your exercise while catching up.
  • Visit your local farmer’s market. Take advantage of seasonal produce and local vendors. A trip to the farmer’s market can be a great opportunity to try new foods,  incorporate healthier options into your diet and enjoy local produce.
  • Gardening is a great way to meditate, enjoy the outdoors and get some sunshine.   It is an opportunity to spend time with your family and make new friends.
  • Tidy one small space in your home or office.    Organize a drawer or your desktop– even having one space clean and free of clutter helps you feel calmer.
  • Make a summer playlist. There are many great summer tunes to enjoy.   Music is an easy way to improve your mood and motivate you to get moving.
  • Have a picnic. Enjoying a meal outside is an easy way to get fresh air and sunshine. 
  • Try a new exercise.  Try a new outdoor activity.  Hiking, pickle ball or swimming are frequent outdoor activities.  Remember to use sunscreen and bug spray!   
  • Participate in community events.  Search online or in the newspaper for events going on around town. Consider outdoor movies, yard sales, festivals, farmer’s markets, or concerts.  Making fun plans is exciting and gives you something to look forward to.
  • Start a journal. Writing can be a great way to express how you feel and check-in with your emotions. Or create a drawing or doodle journal.  Document summer1
  • Reconnect with someone. Call an old friend – family member or grandparent.
  • Go exploring.  Look into areas you have not visited in your community.  Find a new part of town you have never visited and visit. 
  • Practice mindfulness. Try meditation or create a list of 10 things you are thankful for daily.
  • Complete a needs assessment.   How was last week?  How can you make next week better?  Do you need more sleep?  Prepare some healthy meals in advance and freeze.  Take a moment to reflect and decide what is needed to take better care of yourself. 

Use these ideas to complete your own self-care checklist this summer.  Small changes to your routine can improve your self-care practice and overall mood. Focus on new ways you can be active, get outside and get involved with your community. Have a great summer!

Written by:  Beth Stefura, OSU Extension Educator, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Margaret Jenkins, OSU Extension Educator, Clermont County, jenkins.188@osu.edu

References

https://extension.illinois.edu/global/summer-self-care-series

Self-care: 4 ways to nourish body and soul – Harvard Health

Self Care 101 | Psychology Today

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »