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Posts Tagged ‘New Year’s Resolution’

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Here it is–December 2018. Another year is ending!  It is a wonderful time of year to celebrate with family and friends.  A time to share joy and kindness.

Let’s look back for a moment. Did you reach all your goals this year?  Did you keep those New Year Resolutions?  Every year we resolve to make changes and improve ourselves, yet often end up feeling tired and over-extended.  Challenge yourself to end this year, and begin 2019, with being present and living your best life.

Before the end of the year:

  • Create a list of the 15 best things you accomplished
  • Make a list of 5 things you wish you’d done
  • Extend a heartfelt “Thank You” to the people who helped get you thru the year
  • Forgive
  • Be grateful
  • Donate 10 personal items to a good cause
  • Apologize for all of the mistake you made
  • Visit that person you kept saying you would visit
  • Make a list of 10 items that surprised you
  • Exercise
  • Eat well
  • Create an action plan to define your path for 2019

Enjoy December.

Written by:  Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

Sources: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/stories/ten_tips_for_enjoying_holidays.html

 

 

 

 

 

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2017-loading-pic

While ringing in the New Year, many of us also resolve to make THIS the year that we finally realize our goals. Unfortunately, many of us find ourselves off the resolution wagon before January has ended. Every year people say they are going to exercise more, be healthier, quit smoking, get organized, lose weight, manage money, etc. By the time February rolls around, those ambitions have gone by the wayside. Well, FEAR NOT! Using some scientifically proven steps, lasting change is achievable.

Researchers have identified distinct stages of change that people who are able to achieve success progress through. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) was developed in the late 1970’s by James O. Prochaska, PhD and Carlo C. DiClemente, PhD, when they contrasted the experiences of people who were able to quit smoking on their own, versus those who needed additional treatment. People quit smoking when they were ready to quit. The TTM operates on the assumption that people do not change behaviors quickly and decisively. Rather, change in behavior, especially habitual behavior, occurs continuously through a cyclical process.1

The Transtheoretical Model

  • Pre-contemplation: Someone may realize there is a problem and they may be thinking about changing it, but they have not yet made a commitment to do anything about it. People can be stuck in this phase for many years.
  • Contemplation: Someone plans to make some changes in the relatively near future. They have started to think about the good and bad things associated with making these changes.
  • Preparation: Someone is going to take action soon. They may start taking small steps toward the change.
  • Action: Someone has recently started making some changes in their behavior to make progress toward their goal.
  • Maintenance: Someone has been continuing with the behavior changes for a period of time and they plan to stick with them.
  • Termination: Someone no longer has any desire to revert back to their previous behaviors. Most people don’t get to this point, so it is often not part of many programs.

changePeople do not succeed in achieving their New Year’s resolutions or other goals because they are unaware of these stages. In addition to this, the professionals people seek for help, may also be unaware of what stage of change the someone is actually in. They assume since a person has come to them asking for help, that they are in the action phase, when this may not be accurate. Consider whether the stage of change that you are in right now is appropriate for the expectations you may have set on January 1st. If not, adjust your timeline and your goals accordingly.

So, if achieving your goal weight, exercising more, eating better, quitting smoking, managing finances, or whatever has slipped by the wayside, you can still be successful in 2017!

Author: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

Reviewer: Amanda Bohlen, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University, Washington County.

Sources:

Boston University School of Public Health http://sphweb.bumc.bu.edu/otlt/MPH-Modules/SB/BehavioralChangeTheories/BehavioralChangeTheories6.html

Research Gate https://www.researchgate.net/publication/285796052_Applying_the_Stages_of_Change

SAGE Journals http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.4278/ajhp.140627-QUAL-304

Medline Plus https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162833.html

Medline Plus https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162820.html

Harvard Business School http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/5-new-year-s-resolutions-you-can-keep-with-the-help-of-behavioral-science-research

Case Western Reserve University http://www.centerforebp.case.edu/stories/stages-of-change-co-creator-carlo-diclemente-discusses-practical-applications-of-his-transtheoretical-model-for-health-wellness-and-recovery

University of California, San Francisco https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2016/12/405201/scientific-reasons-keeping-your-new-years-resolutions

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/behavior.htm

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Welcome to 2017! Did you make any New Year’s resolutions? If so, chances are you set at least one goal related to staying fit and healthy. About 45% of Americans usually make New Year’s resolutions, and losing weight is at the top of the list.

myplate_yellowWe all know that healthy eating is important, but sometimes it’s easier said than done when hectic schedules and tight budgets get in the way. To achieve your goal, a little bit of thought and planning can go a long way! One strategy is to use MyPlate as a guide to brainstorm meals that fit your family’s lifestyle and preferences. I find that it can be helpful to consider three main meal components – grains, vegetables and protein – and think about how to combine those components to make fast, nutritious meals throughout the week.

  1. Grains – Grains are often the base of a meal, especially if you’re fixing a skillet dish or casserole. Foods in the grain group include rice, quinoa, barley, pasta, couscous, bread and tortillas. MyPlate recommends we make at least half our grains whole grains, so look for whole grain varieties as available. When you cook a grain such as rice, quinoa, barley or pasta, you may want to fix a full pot so that you have enough to keep in the refrigerator or freezer and use to create “heat and eat” meals throughout the week.
  1. Vegetables – MyPlate recommends we make half our plate fruits and vegetables, and this can include fresh, frozen and canned items. I like to roast fresh vegetables in large batches and combine them with pre-cooked grains to create quick meals throughout the week. Frozen vegetables are also a fast and convenient way to add nutrition to meals.
  1. Protein – Protein includes meat, poultry, fish and eggs as well as nuts, seeds and beans. As with grains, when cooking meat or poultry, consider cooking enough to last the entire week. You can bake or grill meats, then use them in soups, casseroles or skillet meals in addition to being entrees. Canned beans are great to have on hand to conveniently add protein to your meals.

couscousWhen you take the time to prepare grains, vegetables and protein in advance, it’s easy to throw together a quick weeknight meal. Dairy and fruit can then be added as toppings or side dishes.

Here are a few examples:

  • Whole grain couscous with broccoli, carrots, chickpeas (or chicken), feta cheese and raisins
  • Whole grain pasta with salmon, asparagus, lemon zest and Parmesan cheese, served with a side salad
  • Risotto with Brussels sprouts, bacon, Parmesan cheese and apple slices
  • Hamburger skillet with whole wheat macaroni, bell pepper, onion, tomato and cheese
  • Tuna noodle casserole with peas and mushrooms
  • Quinoa with roasted beets, orange slices, goat cheese and almond slivers served over arugula or spring mix
  • Quinoa with sliced apples or pears, feta cheese and almond slivers served over spring mix
  • Veggie wraps with sliced turkey, avocado and cheese

Do you have any favorite 30-minute MyPlate meals? Look for additional inspiration and share your ideas at MyPlate, MyWins.

 

Author: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewer: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, O.S.U. South Centers, remley.4@osu.edu

 

Sources:

Statistic Brain (2016). New Year’s Resolution Statistics. http://www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statistics/

USDA ChooseMyPlate.gov (2016). MyPlate, MyWins. https://www.choosemyplate.gov/myplate-mywins

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winter exercise

According to Wikipedia, a mulligan is second chance to perform an action, usually after the first chance went wrong through bad luck or a blunder.  Well, I’m taking a mulligan on my exercise routine!  I was pretty faithful to my favorite activity of walking, recording with my Fitbit and using an app on my phone to track my activity.  Then, “life” happened…I got busy with work and family and holidays, etc. and my exercise routine suffered. I failed to keep it a priority.  But, the New Year happened last Thursday, and I decided to “take a Mulligan”.  I’m starting over.  I’ve walked outside everyday this year!

But, walking outside can be pretty cold!  Fortunately, there is a small college in my town and they allow the general public to utilize their fitness facility with a great walking track. I like to go there.  If you’re not in a similar situation, consider other options available to you, such as walking in a large Home Improvement or Warehouse type store.  Think about walking in a hospital, and using the stairs between each floor.  Go to an indoor shopping mall, just pocket your cash for now. Look for other climate controlled opportunities in your area.  Of course, there’s always indoor fitness equipment to purchase, if you want to do that.

If you do walk outside, there can be many wonderful advantages.  The environment varies, you see others who are choosing to be healthy, too, and that is an encouragement. The crisp air can be invigorating and energizing!   Just be sure to dress for the weather and the exercise and follow these simple tips:

  • Always check with your doctor before beginning any exercise program, but especially if you are considering heading outside during these cold winter months and have certain conditions, such as asthma, heart problems or Raynaud’s disease.
  • Check the forecast. The wind can play a major role in staying warm.
  • Avoid the inclination to overdress. Exercise will generate heat, so dress in layers that you can remove as you warm up. Otherwise, you’ll get too hot, then perspiration will begin to evaporate and you will feel too cool. Look for base layer fabrics designed for winter workouts. Fabrics that wick away moisture will keep you dryer and warmer.
  • Protect your head, hands, feet and ears. These extremities get cold because blood flow is concentrated in your core.
  • Be sure to drink plenty of fluids.
  • Call a friend to go with you for support and accountability.

There more details at these sites providing additional, in-depth information:

Sources: Mayo Clinic http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/in-depth/fitness/art-20045626

WebMD http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/how-to-keep-working-out-in-winter

 

Writer: Kathryn K Dodrill, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County.

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County.

 

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