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Posts Tagged ‘Nutrition’

Picture of toy teeth eating candy

Although I’m the son of a dentist, I can’t say that I practice the best dental hygiene all of the time. I love sweets, sometimes forget to brush on weekends, and don’t floss every day.

Oral health has been associated with overall health. Gingivitis (inflammation and swelling of gums), for example, has been linked to cardiovascular disease, arthritis, poor diabetes control, and even memory function. Therefore, in addition to preventing cavities and bad breath, there are many other reasons for practicing good oral hygiene.

Have you ever had arguments with others about how often, when and how to brush, floss or visit the dentist? There are many myths about brushing that should be addressed….

  1. If you don’t eat candy, you won’t get cavities.  Cavities form when bacteria in plaque form acids that wear away your enamel. Harmful bacteria like simple sugars, but they also like other carbohydrates such as the starches found in potatoes, pasta and breads. So yes, it’s better if you can cut back on sweets, but don’t think that brushing and flossing still aren’t important. Generally, it’s better for your teeth if you consume sweets during meals and have less sweets and snacks throughout the day.
  2. Diet Sodas won’t hurt my teeth. Diet sodas are better than regular soda because they don’t have the sugar. However, like other carbonated beverages, juices, wine, and coffee, they are acidic, which is harmful to your enamel. In fact, dentists recommend brushing 1 hour after eating or drinking beverages such as coffee in order to avoid brushing away small pieces of enamel.
  3. I should brush and floss after every meal. Actually, experts recommend only brushing in the evening (before bed) and one other time during the day, for at least 2 minutes. The evenings are important because saliva production decreases during the night, leaving the teeth more at risk for decay. Rather than brushing after each meal, chewing gum throughout the day can increase saliva production which can be helpful, as long as the gum is sugar-free. If you do brush after a meal, wait an hour to do so, and remember to floss once a day.
  4. Natural tooth pastes are better for you and better for the environment. There are many products marketed as eco-friendly or natural. If you choose these products, make sure they contain fluoride; otherwise, they won’t be as effective at preventing cavities. There are toothpaste tablets with fluoride that you can also purchase, so that you don’t have to use the disposable plastic tubes. Biodegradable bamboo toothbrushes are also available. Speaking of fluoride, it’s better just to spit, rather than rinse, so the fluoride stays in your mouth longer.
  5. I don’t need to visit the dentist if I don’t have any problems. See your dentist regularly. Cavities don’t always cause toothaches, and dentists can remove plaque which will prevent cavities. Most adults need a check-up and cleaning twice a year. A dentist or hygienist can discuss and demonstrate the best ways to brush and floss.

Author: Dan Remley, Associate Professor, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, OSU Extension

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Sources:

WebMD. The Mouth-Body Connection: 6 Ways Oral Hygiene Helps Keep You Well. 2017. https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/gum-disease-health#2

WebMD. Myths and Facts about Cavities. 2016. https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/cavities-myths#3

Oral Health Foundation. Diet and My Teeth. 2019. https://www.dentalhealth.org/diet-and-my-teeth

American Dental Association- Mouth Healthy. Your Top 9 Questions About Going to the Dentist—Answered! 2019. https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/dental-care-concerns/questions-about-going-to-the-dentist

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We have all heard the saying “breakfast is the most important meal of the day”. When I was younger, I did not eat breakfast before going off to school. Like all families, we were busy in the mornings and my mom did not make it a priority for us to eat breakfast. Several years ago, I started taking medicine in the morning. I realized quickly that if I did not eat breakfast with it I would get sick. I still struggle with eating breakfast each morning.

Next year my daughter will be starting college. So I have stressed to her about how important it is to eat breakfast each morning. To meet our needs I have been looking for quick and easy ideas. I have discovered there are many great web sites out there to help in getting ideas for healthy breakfasts.

The American Dietetic Association states that children who eat a healthy breakfast are more apt to have better concentration, alertness, creativity, miss fewer days of school, and be more active.

Here are some ideas from the Eatright.org web site on how to insure you and your children are getting a healthy breakfast each morning.Yogurt and apple slices

If You Wake Up on Time, Eat …

  • Scrambled Eggs: Serve with turkey bacon, fruit and whole-grain toast.
  • Whole-Grain Waffles: If you have a waffle iron, try a whole-grain waffle mix from the grocery store for a special treat. Serve topped with fresh fruit.

If You Hit the Snooze Button One Time, Eat …

  • English Muffin Sandwich: Toast a whole-grain English muffin. Put low-fat cheese and sliced deli ham on the toasted muffin. Warm the sandwich in the microwave to melt the cheese. Grab a piece of fruit for a complete breakfast.
  • Breakfast Tacos: Scramble and cook one egg (or two egg whites). Serve eggs, salsa and low-fat cheese in corn tortillas.
  • Classic Cereal Gets an Upgrade: Cut up some fresh fruit and add to an unsweetened breakfast cereal.
  • Yogurt Parfait: Layer yogurt with fresh or frozen fruit and granola.

If You Hit the Snooze Button Three (or More) Times, Eat …

  • Instant Oatmeal: Look for varieties without added sugar and just add boiling water.
  • 45-Second Scrambled Eggs: Put eggs and a splash of milk in a bowl, whisk it up and put it in a microwave for 30 seconds. Stir and put back in for another 10 seconds.
  • Peanut Butter Sandwich: Grab a banana while you’re at it.
  • Cream Cheese on Whole-Grain Bread: Try it on a bagel or tortillas.

Sources:

Breakfast Ideas for Busy Mornings, eatright.org
https://www.eatright.org/food/planning-and-prep/snack-and-meal-ideas/breakfast-ideas-for-busy-mornings

September: Breakfast Month
By Lisa Franzen-Castle, PhD, RD Extension Nutrition Specialist UNL Panhandle Research & Extension Center
https://food.unl.edu/documents/Sept_NatlBreakfastMonth_8_26_2010_Web.pdf

 

Written by: Brenda Sandman-Stover, Extension Program Assistant, 4-H and Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Greene County

Reviewed by: Melanie Hart, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension,

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It’s been over thirty years since Chia Pets were all the rage, and today, chia is popular once again! This time around, though, chia seeds are trending in the food world because of their nutritional benefits.

Hailing from a plant in the mint family, chia seeds have long been cultivated and consumed in Central and South America, and they were once a major food source for people in Mexico and Guatemala.

These tiny seeds pack a nutritional punch as they are high in protein and fiber, rich in antioxidants, and a source of omega-3 fatty acids. A 2-tablespoon serving of chia seeds contains 190 calories, 4 grams of protein, 12 grams of carbohydrates, 11 grams of fiber, and 9 grams of fat, along with numerous vitamins and minerals. Chia seeds are thought to help with weight loss because of their fiber and protein content; when added to foods, they can help you feel fuller for longer and eat less. However, nutrition professionals recommend substituting chia seeds for items in your diet rather than adding them to your diet, as even a small serving contains a significant number of calories.

So, what are some ways to incorporate chia into your diet? You could: chia-3297309_1920

For a seemingly indulgent chia-based treat, try this recipe for Mango-Vanilla-Chia pudding:

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup chia seeds
  • 3 cups milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons sweetener of choice, divided
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 cups frozen mango chunks
  • Fresh mint leaves and berries, for garnish (optional)

Instructions:

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together chia seeds, 2 1/2 cups milk, vanilla, 1 teaspoon sweetener and a pinch of salt. Let sit 10 minutes, then whisk again. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 4 hours or overnight.
  2. Place mango,1/2 cup milk and 1 teaspoon sweetener in a blender and puree until smooth.
  3. Scoop chia seed pudding into dessert glasses, then top with mango puree. Garnish with berries and mint if desired.

Do you have a favorite use for chia seeds? Let us know by leaving a comment in the box below!

 

Sources:

Point, C. (2018). Chia Seed Pudding 3 Ways. Food and Nutrition Magazine. https://foodandnutrition.org/blogs/student-scoop/chia-seed-pudding-3-ways/

The Nutrition Source. Chia Seeds. Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/food-features/chia-seeds/ 

The Nutrition Source. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: An Essential Contribution. Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fats-and-cholesterol/types-of-fat/omega-3-fats/

Written by: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu.

Reviewed by: Lisa Barlage, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, barlage.7@osu.edu.

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Meal prepping for your week ahead has become a very popular trend lately. This can help you to stay on track with your nutrition and budget, and save time. Before you can meal prep, however, you need to effectively make a meal plan. This includes your grocery list and deciding on what all your meals will be for the week.

In order to keep within your budget, begin by looking at your local grocery store’s weekly ad. This circular indicates which items in the store are on sale or have special discounts for that week. In addition to  weekly ads, many grocery stores also offer coupons, either in the store or online, that can help you to save even more! By looking at these resources, you can utilize many food items that are on sale, resulting in a diverse yet equally exciting meal plan. In addition, it’s a good idea to be aware of what produce items are in season throughout the year. Those items also tend to be cheaper when they are in season and more abundant.

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Once you have determined which food items match your taste and budget from grocery store ads and coupons, it’s time to put those food items together to create complete meals. In order to achieve a healthy, balanced diet, start with including at least three food groups in every meal. Here is an example of typical meal prep menu that my husband and I really like to eat in a day:

Breakfast: Overnight oats – old fashioned oats (grains), non-fat milk/Greek yogurt (dairy), topped with fruit (fruit)

Lunch: Turkey taco salad – mixed greens and pico de gallo (non-starchy vegetables), ground turkey seasoned with taco seasoning (protein), and low-fat shredded cheese (dairy), with lime juice

Dinner: Baked garlic lemon chicken (protein) over rice (grains) with asparagus (non-starchy vegetable)

An interactive plate tool is a great way to check how many food groups you are including at your meal: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/create-your-plate/?referrer=https://www.google.com/ You can be as creative as you want to be, and this tool will help to ensure that you are getting nutrient variety at every meal. Give meal planning a try, and share with us some of your favorite meal prep ideas!

Written By: Amy Meehan, MPH, Healthy People Program Specialist, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences

Reviewed By: Shannon Carter, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County

References:

http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/create-your-plate/?referrer=https://www.google.com/

http://www.choosemyplate.gov

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Spaghetti squash is a vegetable that can be used in place of traditional spaghetti pasta with your favorite sauce. It is full of folic acid, potassium, beta carotene, fiber, and Vitamins A and C – with a one cup serving coming in at 42 calories, versus the almost 200 calories a traditional cup of pasta contains. Photo of spaghetti squash

Spaghetti squash is an oblong winter squash that is ivory-yellow in color and weighs 2 to 3 pounds. A mature squash will be 4 to 5 inches in diameter and about 8 to 9 inches long with rounded ends. When selecting squash, look for a hard rind, free of bruises, and heavy in comparison to others. Squash can be stored at a mild temperature (50 – 60 degrees) for up to 6 months.

To prepare spaghetti squash, cut the squash in half lengthwise, and scrape out seeds. Place cut side down on a roasting pan in a 375 degree F oven for 45 to 60 minutes. Hull will be soft to the touch and beginning to brown when ready. Let cool about 30 minutes and spoon squash strands out, separating to form spaghetti like strands. Microwaving is also an option – place cut squash in a glass dish (cut side down) with ½ inch of water and microwave for 10 to 12 minutes. Cool and remove squash strands.

Try serving your spaghetti squash with a Roma tomato sauce or your favorite jar sauce for a quicker meal. Ohio State University Heart Hospital has a wonderful Oven Roasted Spaghetti Squash with Roma Tomato Marinara if you are looking for an option. To see a video of how to prepare spaghetti squash go to http://go.osu.edu/spaghettisquash.

Let us know your favorite way to eat spaghetti squash!

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County.

Sources:

The Ohio State University Heart Hospital, https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/

University of Illinois Extension, http://web.extension.illinois.edu/ccdms/facts/140218.html

Michigan State University Extension, http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/spaghetti_squash_also_called_vegetable_spaghetti

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Many people forget how important it is to start your day with a fueling breakfast. We often forget to include this meal due to lack of time and planning around hectic schedules. One versatile breakfast item that my family and I enjoy is a veggie egg muffin. This simple dish has fresh ingredients, is easy to make with only a few ingredients, and is packed with protein from the eggs and fiber from its veggies. One large egg has 6 grams of protein, including essential amino acids and only 70 calories. Eggs also provide a rich source of vitamin D, phosphorus, riboflavin and selenium. Additionally, eggs are very economical to make; one egg has an average cost of approximately 8.5 cents in today’s market.    .

Vegetable Egg Muffin on a Plate

Veggie Egg Muffins

I like to make many versions of this recipe, depending on what I have available in my refrigerator. I always start with 10-12 eggs, and add milk and various veggies on hand. I also add additional spices to enhance the flavor. Spices include fresh garlic (or garlic powder), onion powder, parsley flakes, and sometimes fresh or dried basil.

Here is an egg muffin recipe that I would to share to get started. This can be modified based on your veggie preferences and items you have on hand.

Veggie Egg Breakfast Muffins
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 25 minutes
Yield: 12 muffins

Ingredients

  • 12 large eggs
  • ¼ cup nonfat milkEggs in a bowl. Peppers, onion, spinach, broccoli, and mushrooms on cutting board
  • 1 cup chopped fresh spinach
  • ½ cup shredded cheese
  • ½ cup diced onions
  • 3 medium-size mushrooms
  • ½ cup broccoli
  • 2 peppers, diced
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • Cooking Spray

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease a muffin pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, nonfat milk and ½ teaspoon pepper. Stir in the spinach, broccoli, mushrooms, diced peppers and onions. After vegetables are mixed together, add your cheese to the bowl.Egg mixture with veggies in a bowl

Divide the mixture evenly between the 12 muffin pan cups and bake the muffins for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the egg is fully cooked. Remove the muffins from the oven and let them cool for 5 minutes in the pan then use a knife to loosen the muffins from the cups.
*Adapted from Just a Taste

These healthy egg muffins taste good by themselves, but I often will make it into an egg sandwich to add more fiber. I start with a whole grain sandwich thin, and then add guacamole, taco sauce, 1 slice of cheese, and sometimes a thin slice of deli turkey. After I’ve assembled my sandwich, I warm it up in the microwave for about 30-45 seconds. This is a great sandwich to start the day. They can be made the night before and put in a sandwich bag for a quick grab-and-go breakfast or afternoon snack. My husband likes to have it as a mid-afternoon pick-me-up snack.

If they will not be used in 5 days, plan to put them in the freezer for a later date.

Why not give it a try this week, and leave a reply in the comment box below to share other ideas for a healthy breakfast egg muffin.

Resources:
http://www.eggnutritioncenter.org/egg-nutrition-basics/

http://www.aeb.org/news-trends/incredible-breakfast-trends/new-consumer/millennial-evolution

https://www.justataste.com/healthy-breakfast-egg-muffins-recipe/

 

Written by:  Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu and Shannon Smith, RD, LD, Program Coordinator IGNITE Grant, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, smith.11604@osu.edu

Reviewed by:   Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension,   remley.4@osu.edu

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Watermelon… it is almost synonymous with summer. Juicy, sweet, colorful and versatile, this nutrition-packed fruit is the perfect treat on a hot day. Read on to learn more facts about watermelon…

NationalWatermelonDayHeader

Nutrition

Red watermelon is a good source of lycopene, a phytonutrient that gives watermelon its color. Lycopene may reduce the risk of heart disease and a growing list of cancers.

Watermelon is also rich in vitamin C. In fact, just 1 cup of watermelon provides about 20 percent of our daily vitamin C needs. Vitamin C may reduce the risk of arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and some cancers.

To get the maximum amount of nutrients:

  • Pick melons when they are fully ripe. This prevents losses of vitamin C and carotenoids while waiting to ripen.
  • Consume melons within 5‐7 days of bringing them home.
  • Store melons whole and slightly below room temperature.
    • Once cut, leftover melon needs to be stored in the refrigerator, although storing melons cut‐up decreases vitamin C and carotenoids. Freezing melons preserves vitamin C but causes losses of other vitamins and phytonutrients.

Selection: How do you pick a good one?

Ohio State University Extension offers these tips for Selecting Ohio Melons:

  • “Examine the spot where the melon has been resting on the ground. A yellow-white spot indicates ripeness—white or pale green suggests immaturity.
  • Scratch the surface of the rind with your thumbnail. If the outer layer slips back with little resistance showing the green-white under the rind, the watermelon is ripe. Scratching unripe melons only leaves a darker depressed line.
  • Choose a melon with a smooth surface, dull sheen, and well-rounded ends.
  • Some experts recommend a “hollow” sound when tapped indicates ripeness. Others feel that “thumping” will not necessarily get you a ripe melon.
  • White seeds usually indicate the melon was picked too early.”

Fun Facts from the Watermelon Board:

  • Watermelon is 92% water.
  • Watermelon’s scientific name is Citrullus Lanatus of the botanical family Curcurbitaceae. It is a cousin to cucumbers, pumpkins and squash.
  • According to Guinness World Records, the world’s heaviest watermelon was grown by Chris Kent of Sevierville, Tennessee in 2013, weighing in at 350.5 lbs.
  • The United States currently ranks 6th in worldwide production of watermelon.
  • By weight, watermelon is the most-consumed melon in the U.S., followed by cantaloupe and honeydew.
  • Early explorers used watermelons as canteens.

For more information and tasty recipes using watermelon, check out these websites:

The Watermelon Board

USDA Mixing Bowl

Sources:

Selecting, Storing and Serving Ohio Melons (PDF|342KB). Ohio State University Extension.

Recipes with Watermelon. USDA Mixing Bowl.

The Watermelon Board

 

Written by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County, carter.413@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Jenny Lobb, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

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