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Posts Tagged ‘physical activity’

Fall is here!  The mornings are cooler and there is a hint of color on the trees.  Fall is a perfect time to enjoy the beauty of the season.  Cool morning air, beautiful colors  and even some pumpkin spice.   It’s time to pause, reflect and recharge.  With the holiday season around the corner, it’s the season to slow down and assess your health and wellness.

Change is challenging, not only for the trees but for people too.   Ask a friend or colleague to join you in your journey to wellness.  Here are some tips for a healthier fall:

  • Boost your immunity– as colder weather arrives, it’s important to boost your immune system with foods containing Vitamin C (oranges, limes, grapefruit, peppers) to help fight off infections.  Almonds, garlic, ginger, and spinach also aids immunity health. Wash your hands often and drink lots of water.
  • Have dinner with your family.   It’s a perfect time to reconnect with your family.  Families that eat together tend to consume healthier meals and strengthen family relationships.
  • Visit a local farmers market.  Add in-season  fruits and vegetables into your meals.  Apples, turnips, brussels sprouts, and squash are great in-season options to add to your meals for nutrient dense benefits.
  • Watch those tailgate party calories.  Enjoy,  yet consider filling up on vegetables and modify foods to healthier options.
  • As cooler weather arrives, it’s a perfect time to get outdoors and enjoy the beauty of the season. Take a walk-in nature for increased physical activity.
  • Sterilize your most touched items.  Your cell phone, keyboard, remote, and tablet are exposed to bacteria.  Wipe down these surfaces frequently with a sanitizing wipe. 
  • Get enough vitamin D — This essential vitamin helps the body absorb calcium. We get most of our Vitamin D from the sun, so our intake decreases when the weather is colder since we spend most of our time inside during the fall/winter seasons. If you find you are not getting outside much, good sources of  Vitamin D include  salmon, tuna, and mushrooms.  Fortified foods that contain Vitamin D are cow’s milk, orange juice cereal and oatmeal. Vitamin D  can boost your mood and immune system!
  • Prepare your home for possible extreme weather conditions.  Is your snow shovel accessible?  Is your furnace and snow blower serviced and set to go.  Check the batteries in your flashlights and smoke detectors. 

With so many fun activities to do in the fall — apple picking, corn mazes, fall festivals, tail gating, football —  you’ll want to stay healthy to enjoy it all!

Have a happy and healthy fall!

Written by: Beth Stefura, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Shari Gallup, Assistant Professor, Ohio State University Extension, Licking County, gallup.1@osu.edu

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/healthy-fall.htm

https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/tips_for_staying_healthy_in_the_fall

https://www.webmd.com/women/features/8-fall-steps-for-healthy-living

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Senior woman sitting on carpet and touching forehead with hand

Falls are the leading cause of injury, even fatal injury, among older adults, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). More than 1 in 4 Americans experience at least 1 fall every year, resulting in over 800,000 hospitalizations annually. Unfortunately, the numbers of people dying as a result of falling has been increasing, and researchers predict that by 2030, 168 deadly falls will occur each day in the U.S. 

The topic of falls is something to think and talk about. There are many commonly believed misconceptions about falls that may hinder someone from taking appropriate action that may reduce their risk of falling. For instance, some believe that loss of strength and accompanying falls are a normal part of aging and feel that limiting their activity and staying home will help prevent falls. However, the majority of falls (60%) occur in the home, while only 30% occur in public. Getting regular physical activity helps maintain strength and independence. Living spaces can be made safer by keeping floors free of clutter, making sure handrails and adequate lighting are present in all stairways, and securing rugs with double-sided tape or removing them altogether. Bathrooms can be made safer with the installation of grab bars in the tub/shower and toilet areas. 

Another misconception is that use of an assistive device, such as a cane or walker, will make a person more dependent, but these aids help many adults maintain or improve their mobility, allowing them to move about without assistance from others, even helping them to transport or carry items using a walker storage seat. For optimal benefit and safety, however, it is best for a physical or occupational therapist to provide proper fit and instruction on the use of such devices. 

While loss of balance and decreasing eyesight carry obvious risks for falls, there are other health concerns that require regular attention as well. Older adults should have their hearing and feet checked regularly;  according to John’s Hopkins Medicine, people with even mild hearing loss are 3 times more likely to fall than those with normal hearing. Certain disease states can affect the shape and sensitivity of our feet, possibly requiring special footwear for optimal safety and fit.

The National Council on Aging has set aside September 18th-24th as Falls Prevention Awareness Week, a national campaign to raise awareness of the devastating impact of falls and to increase knowledge of risk factors and actions which can be taken to prevent falls in the first place. They offer an online  “Falls Free CheckUp” tool to help individuals and family members assess fall risk and link them to other resources providing practical ways to help prevent a fall. The first step for most of us is to have a conversation, whether with a loved one we may be worried about or with our own care provider, about fall risks that should be addressed. 

Another practical way to improve mobility and decrease the risk of falling is to take part in Tai Chi for Beginners, a free online class offered Sept 19-Nov 4 through OSU Extension. Register at: https://go.osu.edu/tai-chi-autum2022

Written by Jennifer Little, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Hancock County

Reviewed by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County

Sources:

Debunking the Myths of Older Adult Falls.  NCOA Falls Prevention Week Toolkit.  https://www.ncoa.org/article/falls-prevention-awareness-week-toolkit.  Accessed 8/31/2022. 

Get the Facts on Falls Prevention.  July 21, 2022.  NCOA Center for Healthy Aging.  https://www.ncoa.org/article/get-the-facts-on-falls-prevention.

Falls Prevention Conversation Guide For Caregivers.  June 29, 2021. https://www.ncoa.org/article/falls-prevention-conversation-guide-for-caregivers

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Summer is in full swing! Children are home from school and parents may be on the hunt to keep them engaged and involved this summer. A popular choice that many parents have selected is summer camps. There can be a variety of summer camps to choose from. Some opportunities may be day camps; while others are a week away from mom and dad and full of new adventures to enjoy. There are many benefits to youth attending summer camps. These benefits include meeting new friends, trying new activities, physical activity, and creating memories that will last a lifetime. Studies show camps offering structured programs and physical activity may prevent weight gain in youth and help maintain physical fitness over the summer.

Along with the many memories made, summer camps also teach independence. During the week, participants get themselves up, get dressed, and brush their teeth all before the bell sounds to start breakfast and to begin the day. Summer camps also encourage well-being. Youth get to attend camp, see their friends, meet new ones, and come home with so many stories to share. Camps provide opportunities for practicing self-advocacy and other social skills. Youth may also have opportunities to increase self-esteem in these programs. Campers get to try activities and have experiences they can bring home for the rest of the family to enjoy. Various summer camps offer different activities for all to enjoy; there is something for everyone. I know when I was young, summer camps kept me busy and entertained all summer. My favorite memories as a kid came from the various camps I attended. I also made some of my very best friends at summer camp. I encourage parents to provide an opportunity for their youth to attend a summer camp of some variation. It will get children into the great outdoors and there the opportunities are endless. 

Written by: Kearsten Kirby, Student Intern, Ohio State University Extension Miami County kirby.305@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Miami County barton.345@osu.edu

Sources:

15 benefits of summer camp for your kids. GWRYMCA. (n.d.). Retrieved July 11, 2022, from https://gwrymca.org/blog/15-benefits-summer-camp-your-kids

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education; Board on Children, Youth, and Families; Committee on Summertime Experiences and Child and Adolescent Education, Health, and Safety; Hutton R, Sepúlveda MJ, editors.

Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2019 Sep 26.

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Think about all the things we do when our eyes and hands work together: cooking, driving, gardening, opening a door, tying our shoes. etc. Such mundane activities actually take a lot of neurological coordination between our eyes, brain, and hands. As we age, eye-hand coordination can weaken due to cognitive decline and as a result, we can lose our independence. Fortunately, healthy eating and physical activity can prevent or delay this decline. Certain low impact physical activities can help maintain eye-hand coordination such as racquet sports (tennis, pickleball, badminton), swimming, volleyball, non-contact boxing and Tai Chi.

Other less intense but fun activities to improve or maintain eye-hand coordination include:

  • play catch with a friend
  • ping pong
  • golf
  • bounce a ball against a wall
  • cornhole (a beanbag game)
  • juggling
  • play darts (magnetic darts are a safe choice)
  • sew or knit
  • painting, drawing
  • video games
  • frisbee

All of these activities can be modified to accommodate different skill levels. For example, a ball can be blown up into a balloon and tossed between friends, or pickleball can be played instead of tennis, which has a slower, lighter ball and smaller court.

We should get about 150 minutes of physical activity every week for the health benefits. Many of the activities that promote eye hand coordination can also be counted as physical activity. Set a SMART goal for eye hand activities in order to maintain your eye hand coordination and possibly your independence as you age. With SMART goals, you’ll want to find activities that work for you, that are appropriate for your skill level, are fun, and hopeful social too. Check with your YMCA or local Recreation centers for leagues. Pickleball leagues are starting up everywhere. So…

Play Ball!…..or Badminton!…..or Darts!….

Author: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness. OSU Extension

Reviewer: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Wood County

Sources:

Harvard Health Publishing. Activities to Sharpen your Hand-Eye Coordination. Retrieved on 5/11/2022 at https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/activities-to-sharpen-your-eyehand-coordination?msclkid=a207204ed14d11ec811f2a8feff8715a

US Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Retrieved on 5/11/2022 at https://health.gov/our-work/nutrition-physical-activity/physical-activity-guidelines

Lobb, J. Start your Year with a Smart Goal. Retrieved on 5/11/22 at https://livehealthyosu.com/2020/01/17/start-2020-with-a-smart-goal/

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The holiday season is here!  Holiday celebrations often center around food.  We plan to manage our healthy meal plan during the holidays and avoid weight gain yet find ourselves in the office breakroom with a tray of cookies, opening the door to your neighbors’ famous peanut butter fudge or get an invite to go out with friends.   Here are some tips to help maintain weight over the holidays:

  • Eat your fruits and vegetables.  Fill half your plate with vegetables and fruits.  They will satisfy your appetite and induce fullness.
  • Keep moving.  Manage your daily physical activity.  Be active daily!
  • Treat yourself just once a day!  Enjoy that one item daily.  Take a smaller serving.  Cut out an extra 100 calories later in the day.
  • Control the risk of temptation.  Clear your home and office of tempting holiday goodies. Share any gifts of foods.
  • Balance protein intake.  Holiday meals tend to be higher in carbohydrates and low in protein. Include protein with every meal.
  • Never go to a party hungry.  Eat a serving of fruit, yogurt, or raw nuts before you leave for the party. Don’t linger over the buffet table.
  • Get plenty of sleep.  Those who do not sleep adequately tend to be hungrier, consume more calories and exercise less. 
  • Manage stress.  Holidays are often stressful and stressed individuals have higher cortisol levels which is linked to increased hunger and weight gain.

Socialize with friends and family at holiday gatherings and limit access to buffet and dessert tables.  Choose from the crudities tray. Happy Holidays!

Written by Beth Stefura, OSU Extension Educator, Mahoning County stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:Michelle Treber, OSU Extension Educator, Pickaway County  treber.1osu.edu

References:   

Holiday Eating – Today’s Dietitian Magazine (todaysdietitian.com)

https://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/1215p20.shtmlMay Your Holiday Season Be Light: How to Avoid Holiday Weight Gain (todaysdietitian.com)

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Each year I select a word for the upcoming year. It isn’t something I do lightly. I spend time considering what I want to focus my intentions on for the upcoming year. Instead of making numerous New Year resolutions, use this word to set goals or intentions in each area of your life. They can all circle back to your word.

Here are some real-life examples of my journeys this year. One journey this year includes physical wellness. With hip replacement surgery this summer, I truly appreciate the complexities of the body and how important this journey of physical activity and wellness. Physical activity helps all of us. It is a stress reliever and can help you strengthen both your body and mind. If you are new to movement, start slowly and add activity to your day. Not sure you are ready to move more? Check out this website for reasons to get started.  

Another journey for me has been my emotional and mental health. I’m working on emotional wellness by reducing stress, counseling, and practicing mindfulness. Writing in my gratitude journal helps me appreciate life so much more. This simple practice can improve your health and happiness.

The final journey I’ll share is my transition from work life to retirement. I’ve worked since I was 5 years old. My first work memory was my dad asking me to fill the pop cooler at our little grocery store, Treber Grocery. I worked there until we sold the store after my dad’s death when I was 17 years old. This early work experience taught me the value of hard work, customer service and taking care of people. That philosophy has sustained me throughout my work career. I have tried to emulate some of my words of the year: strength, kindness, and balance. As I shift towards retirement or “rewirement” I know that this will be another journey – more free time, fewer work demands and reduced work stress. More time for personal reflection, travel and creative expression to name a few!

The National Institutes of Health has several Wellness Toolkits to help you get started on your Wellness Journey. What are you waiting for?

Your Journey awaits! Feel free to share in our comments about your wellness journey.

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Susan Zies, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

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Two years ago, I wrote an article about how I set a personal goal to return to a fitness routine after the birth of my son and subsequent return to work. I set a SMART goal for myself: I wanted to re-stablish a fitness routine by attending at least one group fitness class every week for a month. My previous fitness routine of attending two classes a week had been disrupted by my pregnancy, and I was eager to return to it.

In the summer and fall months of 2019, I met my initial goal and began to attend classes more frequently, returning to a routine similar to what had been my old normal. I kept that routine until mid-March of 2020 when the global coronavirus pandemic shut down my gym and I found my routine disrupted once again!

In the early months of the pandemic, I adapted by doing at-home workouts in place of group fitness classes, and I continued those for many months. However, I discovered that while those at-home workouts provided me with regular strength-training, my daily step count was depressingly low since I didn’t have much space at home to move around or engage in moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity. I knew this was problematic as the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each week for substantial health benefits, though they do also state that any activity is better than none.

A treadmill desk
My Treadmill Desk

At that point in time, I set a goal for myself to reach at least 7,000 steps each day. My husband and I purchased a treadmill desk which helped tremendously! I began to reach my step goal regularly and increased it to 10,000 steps per day. But then, eventually, I had to start returning to my office for work and did not have the treadmill available for use during the workday. My husband is still working from home and making use of the treadmill desk, and while I tried to order one for my office, it was (and is still) on backorder!

So, what to do now? Despite the challenges and excuses I am tempted to claim, I know it is time once again to reclaim a “normal” fitness routine that meets my needs. My gym is open once again and I am fully vaccinated, so I believe it is time for me to rejoin and start attending group fitness classes to get strength-training AND moderate-intensity exercise on a regular basis. I called my gym to rejoin last week and my SMART goal is the same as it was two years ago: to reestablish a fitness routine by attending at least one group fitness class every week for a month. In some ways it may seem like I have regressed, but when I step back and look at the whole picture, I am reminded that we often grow in fits and spurts, even when we encounter setbacks in our life. The most important lesson is to not give up on our goals and to remember that it’s never too late to start again. We owe it to ourselves and to our health.

Sources:

Lobb, J. (2019). Reclaiming fitness. Live Healthy Live Well. https://livehealthyosu.com/2019/08/22/reclaiming-fitness

Stanford BeWell (2021). Achieving your SMART health goal. https://bewell.stanford.edu/achieving-your-smart-health-goal

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2018). Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition. https://health.gov/paguidelines/second-edition/pdf/Physical_Activity_Guidelines_2nd_edition.pdf

Written by: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Laura Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Warren County, stanton.60@osu.edu

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a snow-covered landscape with trees

Winter is my least favorite season. The cold weather and shorter days make me want to hibernate, and I know I am not alone in feeling this way! Sluggishness and sleepiness, decreased energy, feeling less social, and changes in appetite are all symptoms of the “winter blues”. These symptoms can usually be managed through activities such as exercise, time outdoors, socialization and self-care. If you find that the winter blues are interfering with your ability to carry out daily activities, however, you may have a more serious form of the blues called Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD. SAD is a form of depression that follows a seasonal pattern. It usually begins in the fall, continues through the winter, and resolves in the spring. If you suspect that you have SAD, please be proactive and seek professional help.

For those of us who experience SAD or the winter blues, this season will be especially challenging as most of us have experienced or are currently experiencing the pandemic blues as well. In addition, some of the coping strategies we might normally use to beat the blues need to be modified due to the pandemic. For example, one of the strategies that experts recommend for beating the winter blues is interacting with friends and family regularly. If socializing with others is your primary coping strategy, it is important to understand potential risks of going out and what you can do to reduce the spread of COVID-19. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the risk of COVID-19 spread is directly related to how closely we interact with others and the length of those interactions. If you choose to socialize with others in person, you can reduce your risk by wearing a mask, maintaining a distance of at least six feet, and choosing to meet outdoors rather than indoors.

Gathering outdoors in the winter may seem like an unrealistic or unpleasant option, but that is not always the case! This year is the perfect opportunity to shift your mindset and try something new. In a New York Times parenting column on outdoor winter playdates, author Elisabeth Kwak-Heffran quotes British guidebook writer Alfred Wainwright: “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing.” This column provides numerous tips from winter athletes and professionals for bundling up and enjoying the outdoors in cold weather. While this column makes the case for getting outside in the winter to break cabin fever, an added benefit is that outdoor time is another recommend strategy for beating the winter blues.

Do you want additional strategies for beating the winter blues? View our four session webinar series on beating the winter blues at https://livehealthyosu.com/webinars/.

Written by Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Franklin County

Reviewed by Lorrissa Dunfee, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Belmont County

Sources:

Carter, S. (2014). Beating the Winter Blues. Live Healthy, Live Well blog. https://livehealthyosu.com/2014/02/19/beating-the-winter-blues/

Carter, S. (2020). Beating the Pandemic Blues. Live Healthy, Live Well blog. https://livehealthyosu.com/2020/08/31/beating-the-pandemic-blues/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2020). Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Deciding to go out. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/deciding-to-go-out.html

Harmon, M. (2019). Fall: A SAD Time of Year. Live Healthy, Live Well blog. https://livehealthyosu.com/2019/10/21/fall-a-sad-time-of-year/

Kwak-Heffran, E. (2020). Yes, your kids can play outside all winter. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/04/parenting/kids-winter-play-outside.html

Mayo Clinic (2017). Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/seasonal-affective-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20364651

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There are a lot of things going on in this world right now that can make us feel anxious, worrisome, sad, upset, angry, and even defeated. I would be lying if I said I hadn’t felt any of those feelings in the last several months. Maybe you’ve experienced one of the following scenarios.

Pepperoni pizza in takeout box
  1. Showered a few minutes extra to cry so no one would see or hear you.
  2. Locked yourself in the bathroom to get a few extra minutes of tranquility.
  3. Felt like you can’t continue and just want to feel like yourself again.
  4. Cried in your room for a quick minute when everyone left just to let go.
  5. Ordered pizza for dinner because time escaped and you’re just too tired and emotionally drained to cook anything.
  6. Felt alone, even with others around you.
  7. Felt upset that something you were looking forward to was canceled.

The truth; I have done/felt all of those things over the last several months and I am here to tell you that you can find joy and even build hope. Once I wiped my tears away I began to use positive self-talk to tell myself that I am enough and that I can overcome any obstacle in my way. I wasn’t going to let my stress control me. The Mayo Clinic reports that if we continue to not deal with our stress then it can contribute to many health problems like high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and diabetes.

Some of the strategies I have used to help me has been to:

Letter blocks spelling “rest”
  • Take a walk
  • Listen to a mediation
  • Take some deep breaths
  • Laugh- a lot
  • Talk with friends and family
  • Read a book
  • Listen to positive, uplifting songs
  • Get plenty of sleep
  • Eat healthier foods
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Practice yoga

Please know that if your symptoms continue then you need to seek professional help. A healthcare provider may want to look into other causes or refer you to a counselor who can help you identify your stress and offer new coping tools. Several years ago I was in a very stressful job situation.  I let this stress go untreated. My personality changed and I needed to seek medical help. I felt defeated but my healthcare provider was very supportive and encouraging. She was able to prescribe me a medication to help me through that situation. It’s okay to ask for help, and pizza for dinner again is okay too.

You have worth.

You are important.

You are wonderful.

You are enough.

Bohlen, A. (2019, July 22). Finding joy Retrieved from https://livehealthyosu.com/2019/07/22/finding-joy/

Mayo Clinic . (2019, April 4). Stress symptoms: Effects on your body and behavior. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress-symptoms/art-20050987

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Miami County, barton.345@osu.edu

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A group of people doing stretching exercises

When did you last take time to stretch? If you practice yoga or Pilates regularly, perhaps it was sometime this past week. If you’re like me, you might take a few minutes to stretch at the end of a cardiovascular workout.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans state that stretching exercises can increase flexibility and are an appropriate component of a physical activity program. However, because the health benefits of stretching exercises alone are not known, and it is unclear whether they can reduce the risk of activity-related injuries, time spent doing stretching exercises does not count toward meeting the key guidelines for aerobic or muscle strengthening activities.

Nevertheless, maintaining flexibility through regular stretching promotes mobility, independence, and a healthy range of motion in your joints. Inflexible muscles can shorten, weaken and become tight, which can put you at risk for joint pain, strain, and muscle damage.

If you don’t currently have a stretching routine and are not sure where to start, select a few stretches to do three to four days per week. You might choose to focus on muscles that are critical for mobility, such as your calves, hamstrings, hip flexors and quadriceps. Or, you might choose to focus on areas of your body where you carry tension, such as your shoulders, neck, and lower back.

A woman stretching her leg

Warm up your muscles prior to stretching with five to ten minutes of light activity, such as walking. Then, hold each stretch for 30 seconds and do not bounce, as this can cause injury. You should feel tension during a stretch, but not pain.

If you feel pain while stretching, stop your routine and talk with a doctor. You should also talk with a doctor or physical therapist prior to beginning a stretching routine if you have an injury or chronic condition, such as Parkinson’s or arthritis.

You may find it beneficial to work with a physical therapist or personal trainer when starting a stretching routine, even if you don’t have injuries or conditions of concern. I recently tried a total body stretch session at a local massage clinic, in which a therapist spent an hour coaching me through a variety of stretches. With the help and coaching of a professional, I stretched my body in a more purposeful and deeper way than I typically would, and I held the stretches longer than I typically do.

If working with a professional seems daunting but you still want to try more than a few simple stretches at home, you might consider myofascial release or other self-massage techniques to help loosen your muscles. And, as mentioned previously, yoga and Pilates are also nice ways to work regular stretching into your physical activity routine.

Sources:

Harvard Health Publishing (2019). The importance of stretching. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-importance-of-stretching

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2018). Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition. https://health.gov/paguidelines/second-edition/pdf/Physical_Activity_Guidelines_2nd_edition.pdf

Written by: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

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