Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘retirement’

As we age there are many important things to consider. One of those important considerations is living arrangements. With the aging of America, the retirement living industry has grown exponentially over the past decade providing the seniors of today and tomorrow a vast variety of housing and care options. Understanding the housing choices that are offered can make your selection easier.

The first option is continuing to live at home. As with any other critical decision, you should think about the benefits and challenges of living at home. Some benefits may include being surrounded by friends and family in a familiar setting. Some challenges may include needing outside help with everyday tasks and feeling isolated and lonely.

If you choose to stay at home, think about possible modifications that can be done around your house to make your later years of life easier. This concept of making the home more accessible and safer is called Universal Design. The Virtual Universal Design Tour can show you ideas on modifications that can be made to your home.

The next option is to move to an outside facility. There are various types of settings depending on your desires and needs. Understanding the various options is important to help guide your decisions. Here is a brief overview of housing options for older adults:

Active Adult Communities – offer services and amenities aimed at giving residents a more carefree lifestyle, while also providing social engagement opportunities of all kinds.

Independent Living -refers to a way of life in residential communities designed specifically for those who have reached or are nearing retirement age, but want to remain active and independent.

Assisted Living – is a communal way of life designed for seniors who need help with various daily tasks like grooming, bathing, and medication management, but still wish to remain as independent as possible.

Skilled Nursing Care – provide skilled nursing care, a level of care provided by a registered nurse who monitors a patient’s health and administers treatment around-the-clock.

Residential Care Homes – provide individualized service, often in a standard single-family home. These houses have been modified to accommodate the needs of seniors, and are generally licensed by the state for only two to six beds. Similar to assisted living, residents receive 24-hour care and assistance with activities of daily living, including medication management, housekeeping services, transportation to doctor’s appointments as needed, meals, and social programs.

Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) – offers several different senior living options or care levels all on one campus. It provides a peace-of-mind guarantee of care to residents for the rest of their lives.

Long-Term Care – refers to any community that provides 24-hour care on a long-term basis. Assistance generally includes regular supervision, help with activities of daily living as needed, medication reminders, housekeeping, meals, and social activities.

Memory Care – long-term care that helps those with dementia of Alzheimer’s disease. Memory care is either offered at a stand-alone community, or as an add-on service at some assisted living facilities, Continuing Care Retirement Communities, and nursing homes.

Housing decisions are unique to everyone and will depend on personal preferences, financial resources, and care needs. The National Association of Area Agencies on Aging offers A Guide for Making Housing Decisions that provides more detailed information for housing options for older adults.

Written by: Kathy Tutt, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County

Sources:

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging, Housing Options for Older Adults: A Guide for Making Housing Decisions, retrieved from: https://www.usaging.org/files/HousingOptions.pdf

Prosch, T. (2014). The Other Talk: A Guide to Talking with your Adult Children About the Rest of Your Life. United States: McGraw-Hill Education.

Read Full Post »

Each year I select a word for the upcoming year. It isn’t something I do lightly. I spend time considering what I want to focus my intentions on for the upcoming year. Instead of making numerous New Year resolutions, use this word to set goals or intentions in each area of your life. They can all circle back to your word.

Here are some real-life examples of my journeys this year. One journey this year includes physical wellness. With hip replacement surgery this summer, I truly appreciate the complexities of the body and how important this journey of physical activity and wellness. Physical activity helps all of us. It is a stress reliever and can help you strengthen both your body and mind. If you are new to movement, start slowly and add activity to your day. Not sure you are ready to move more? Check out this website for reasons to get started.  

Another journey for me has been my emotional and mental health. I’m working on emotional wellness by reducing stress, counseling, and practicing mindfulness. Writing in my gratitude journal helps me appreciate life so much more. This simple practice can improve your health and happiness.

The final journey I’ll share is my transition from work life to retirement. I’ve worked since I was 5 years old. My first work memory was my dad asking me to fill the pop cooler at our little grocery store, Treber Grocery. I worked there until we sold the store after my dad’s death when I was 17 years old. This early work experience taught me the value of hard work, customer service and taking care of people. That philosophy has sustained me throughout my work career. I have tried to emulate some of my words of the year: strength, kindness, and balance. As I shift towards retirement or “rewirement” I know that this will be another journey – more free time, fewer work demands and reduced work stress. More time for personal reflection, travel and creative expression to name a few!

The National Institutes of Health has several Wellness Toolkits to help you get started on your Wellness Journey. What are you waiting for?

Your Journey awaits! Feel free to share in our comments about your wellness journey.

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Susan Zies, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County, zies.1@osu.edu

Read Full Post »

Old_WomanIt has been proven that we can, indeed, age gracefully. Let’s look at some of the personal characteristics of healthy people approaching 100 years of age. We all have one thing in common; we grow older every day. Although there is not one specific thing we can do to stop the process, it might be possible to slow down our natural aging and eliminate some age related disorders.

Physically, healthy people are thin. This is achieved by leading a lifestyle that includes a nutritional diet and daily exercise. Consuming low-calorie, nutrient rich foods that consist of lean proteins, plentiful fruits and vegetables gives them a well-rounded diet. Diets of physically healthy people are also typically low in fat, sugars and sodium. In addition, physically healthy people are non-smokers; use only moderate amounts of alcohol; and sleep well. They are rarely ill, use preventative health services, and have a positive outlook about their health.

Intellectually, the healthiest people retired in their seventies and kept active both before and after retirement. They were interested in learning something new every day, had a passion for reading and discussing current events, and often reflected on the good things in life. Regardless of whether their continued education and acquiring of new skills was intentional or not; they benefited greatly from keeping their mind sharp.

Emotionally, those with the longest lifespan were optimistic. They were pleased with their lives, were rarely hostile to others, and adapted well to change in their lives. Having an outlet for relaxation and recreation were also important to them.

Relationships were very important. Most had successful marriages or had always been single. They maintained a large social network, attending social functions whenever possible.

Finally, spiritually, they had many things in their life that provided purpose and meaning for the appreciation of beauty in nature to prayer and meditation each day.

It is never too late to set in motion positive changes in our lives. We are not guaranteed a certain amount of time on earth, but we can surely enhance the quality of the time we are here. It only makes sense to enjoy the company of other people, to learn something new every day, to tell funny stories, and enjoy a good laugh. Cultivating a personal passion after retirement and helping those less fortunate than ourselves will add life to our years.

Source: WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/tc/healthy-aging-topic-overview?page=2.

Written by: Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Butler County, green.1405@osu.edu.

Reviewer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, barlage.7@osu.edu.

Reviewer: Terri Chatfield, Program Assistant, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Butler County, chatfield.25@osu.edu.

Read Full Post »