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Broth versus Stock

Most soups and stews are made from a base of stock or broth.  Have you ever wondered what the difference is between these two items?  The main differences are:

  • the use of bones or meat
  • length of cooking time
  • the type of seasonings added

Stock is made using bones (unless it’s a vegetable stock), water, and a mixture of aromatic vegetables including onions, carrots and celery. The mixture is simmered on the stove top for at least 2 to 6 hours. Generally, there are no seasonings added to stock. This makes stock a lower sodium option for recipes, and a great base for recipes that already have significant flavor. The use of bones in stock makes it a thicker, more gelatinous consistency. 

Broth, on the other hand, takes less time to make, and contains meat (unless it’s a vegetable broth), vegetables and seasonings. Broth is generally simmered on the stove top for no more than two hours, as cooking meat in liquid for longer periods of time toughens the meat.   

Given these definitions, bone broth – which has become increasingly popular in the last few years – is a bit of a misnomer. Bone broth is technically a stock because it is made using bones, as well as vegetables and herbs. It is simmered on the stove top for 12 to 24 hours.

Determining whether to use stock or broth in a recipe may depend on what you are making.  Typically, stock is used in sauces, gravies, stews and as a braising liquid for meats.  Broth works well as a base for soups, stir-fry dishes, dumplings, stuffing, and for cooking grains and legumes.

Although broths and stocks can be purchased in cans and cartons at the grocery store, it is fairly easy to make your own at home. Making broths and stocks from scratch can be a cost saving activity if you save and utilize meat and vegetable scraps that would otherwise be thrown away. Stock can be made on the stove top, in a slow cooker, or even in an electric pressure cooker! The Kitchn provides instructions for making chicken stock using each of these methods.

Sources:

Foster, K. (2018). What’s the Difference Between Bone Broth, Stock and Broth? The Kitchn. https://www.thekitchn.com/the-difference-between-bone-broth-stock-and-broth-254174

Jones, T. (2017). What are the differences between stock and broth? Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/stock-vs-broth

Rattray, D. (2019). What’s the Difference Between Stock and Broth? The Spruce Eats. https://www.thespruceeats.com/difference-between-stock-and-broth-3057787

Written by: Joyce Riley, MS, RD, LD. Former Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Union County.

Reviewed by: Jenny Lobb, MPH, RD, LD. Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Franklin County.

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Lentil Soup - 2What better way to comfort yourself on a chilly day than with the wonderful aroma of soup simmering on the stove?  From hearty vegetable soups to creamy bisques to refreshing chilled soups; soup can be used for appetizers, main dishes, side dishes or desserts and are an economic staple in many diets.

Soup-based meals can help stretch your food dollar while offering a hearty, nutritious, quick and easy meal option.  Soup can be a tasty way to add healthy beans, legumes, grains and vegetables to your diet and a convenient, yet inexpensive way to add protein, vitamins, minerals and fiber.

And after you’ve enjoyed your delicious “bowl of bountiful comfort,” take care to store leftovers properly. According to the United States Department of Agriculture it would take an 8-inch stock pot of steaming chicken soup 24 HOURS to cool to a safe temperature in your refrigerator.  To be safe:

  • Place the pot of soup into a sink full of ice water. Stir frequently – every 10 minutes to help disperse the heat.  Divide large amounts of hot leftover soup into shallow containers – less than 2 inches deep – for quick cooling in the refrigerator.  Once cooled, refrigerate promptly, covering when chilled.  Use within 2 days.
  • Freeze soup for longer storage. Leave ½-inch space at top of container.  Use within 2-3 months.
  • To reheat soup, heat to steaming hot throughout, at least 165 degrees F.

Here are a couple of my favorite soup recipes for you to enjoy!

Lentil and Brown Rice Soup

1 (2 oz.) envelope of Onion, Beefy Onion, or Beefy Mushroom Recipe Soup Mix

1 (14 ½ oz.) can whole peeled tomatoes, un-drained and coarsely chopped

4 c. water

¾ c. lentils, rinsed and drained

½ c. uncooked brown rice or regular rice

1 medium carrot, coarsely chopped

1 large stalk of celery, coarsely chopped

½ tsp. basil leaves

½ tsp. oregano

¼ tsp. thyme leaves (optional)

1 tablespoon finely chopped parsley

1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

¼ tsp. pepper

In large saucepan or stockpot, combine soup mix, water, lentils, uncooked rice, tomatoes, carrot, celery, basil, oregano and thyme.  Bring to a boil, then simmer covered, stirring occasionally, 45 minutes or until lentils and rice are tender.  Stir in remaining ingredients.  Makes about 3 – 2 c. servings.

Tired of getting your fingers burned when removing a piping hot bowl of soup from the microwave?  Learn how to make a microwave cozy.

Chilled Strawberry Soup

1 (10 oz.) pkg. frozen strawberries in syrup, thawed

1 c. low-fat sour cream

2 T. cornstarch dissolved in ½ c. cold water

2 c. whole milk

2 to 4 T. strawberry liqueur

whipping cream for garnish

Boil strawberries in medium saucepan; stir in cornstarch mixture.  Stir and simmer for 3 minutes.  Transfer to a bowl and cool to room temperature.  Whisk in sour cream, milk, and strawberry liqueur.  Cover and chill.

Resources/References:

The Food Safety Educator, http://www.aamp.com/foodsafety/documents/FSE-Volume6- No2.pdf, Volume 6, No. 2, 2001, retrieved January 21, 2014.

Seven Simple Soups and Stews, Alice Henneman, MS, RD, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension.

Soup: What You Need to Know & Favorite Recipes, Wisconsin Cooperative Extension Service.

Written by:  Cynthia R. Shuster, CFLE, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Perry County, Buckeye Hills EERA

Reviewed by:  Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Erie County, Erie Basin EERA

Reviewed by:  Jennifer Lindimore, Office Associate, OSU Extension, Morgan County, Buckeye Hills EERA

Kimberly Barnhart, Office Associate, OSU Extension, Perry County, Buckeye Hills EERA

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clients on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information: go.osu.edu/cfaesdiversity

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Score a touchdown with friends and family tonight with this Buckeye Bean Soup!  Tonight we will cheer on our Ohio State Buckeye Football team in the first NCAA College Football National Championship in Dallas, Texas.baloon  This soup will make a healthy addition to tonight’s pregame meal.  Canned soups generally have 800-1000 mg of sodium per one cup serving. This soup has less than half that amount and is additionally high in fiber .Therefore Buckeye Bean soup is appropriate for people with diabetes, kidney disease, heart disease, or high blood pressure.  Any type of beans can be used in place of pinto beans in this recipe. In addition, if your football fans prefer a creamier soup, the soup can be pureed in a food processor for a creamier consistency if desired. To save time, the vegetables can be chopped ahead and placed in a zip-top bag. The beans can be drained, rinsed and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator before using.

Finally, if you’re New Year’s resolution was to eat healthier, remember portion control with those peanut butter chocolate buckeyes tonight during the game! GO BUCKS  .. BEAT DUCKS!

Winning Buckeye Bean Soup

Makes approximately ten, one cup servings

130 calories per serving , 1 gram Fat, 6 grams Dietary Fiber, 6 Grams Protein

Ingredients:

2 tsp. olive oil

1 cup each diced onions, red pepper and carrots

2 cloves garlic, minced (or ¼ tsp. garlic powder or 1 tsp. bottled pre-minced garlic)

1 tsp. each dried thyme, oregano and parsley

3 cups reduced-sodium broth (can be beef, chicken or vegetable)

1 cup tomato sauce

2 (19 oz.) cans pinto beans, drained and rinsed

1 tsp. brown sugar

¼ tsp. black pepper

Equipment

Measuring cups and spoons

Large saucepan or stockpot

Strainer

Mixing spoon

Ladle

DWDHeartyBeanSoup (1)

Directions

Step 1.  Heat olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add onions, red pepper, carrots, garlic, thyme, oregano and parsley. Cook and stir for 5 minutes, until vegetables begin to soften. Add all remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil.

Step 2. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, covered for 15-20 minutes until vegetables are tender.

Writer: Susan Zies, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Wood County, Erie Basin EERA, Zies..1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Dan Remley, MSPH, PhD, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, Remley.4@osu.edu

Recipe Source: Dining with Diabetes, WVUES 2000-present, original recipe Hearty Vegetable Bean Soup

 

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Sunshine, warm weather and spring rain usher in a new growing season for our local farmers. It won’t be long until we see the products of their efforts at a local farmer’s market.

Early markets will be opening up in the next few weeks. You can expect to see early crops such as asparagus, rhubarb aRedLentilRhubarbSoupnd maple syrup. As we get into May, there will be more of the greens showing up – kale, collards, and mustard greens. Check out the Ohio Farm Bureau’s OUR OHIO website for more information about fruits and vegetables in season, http://ourohio.org/food/whats-in-season. And, try this recipe for Red Lentil and Rhubarb Soup, http://ourohio.org/food/recipes/532/red-lentil-and-rhubarb-soup.

Written by: Linnette Goard, Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection and Management, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, goard.1@osu.edu.

Reviewed by: Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Butler County, Miami Valley EERA.

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As the temperatures have cooled down the last few weeks what foods did you feel like making? I know many of my friends and co-workers have shared that they made traditional or white bean chili, vegetable soup, or chicken noodle soup. Comfort foods like soup just sounded good to them. The good thing to hear about those comfort foods is that they can also be “superfoods”. WebMD lists 14 superfoods that we should eat to protect us from heart disease, cancer, and other health conditions. Many of these foods are high in anti-oxidants, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Seven of the 14 superfoods are also great soup ingredients:

  • Beans – because beans will often take on the flavor of the foods you combine them with, and can be added to almost any soup. If you use canned beans, look at the sodium content on the nutrition facts label and rinse them to cut that level.
  • Tomatoes – the base for many soups, look for no-salt added on the label if you are using canned.
  • Turkey – a perfect food for this time of year, stores already have them on sale and in a couple weeks we will have left-overs to use.
  • Spinach – rinse fresh spinach, chop into smaller pieces, and add to soup shortly before serving.
  • Broccoli – if you want to make a healthier version of broccoli soup be sure to use low fat and low sodium chicken broth, and low fat milk.
  • Soy – soy milk can be used in cream based soups, small cubes of tofu added to almost any soup, and soy “meat replacement” crumbles can be used in place of ground beef or sausage.
  • Pumpkin – another seasonal favorite which can be served as a hot or cold soup.

The wonderful thing about soups is many of them can also be made quickly. Often the ingredients can be kept on hand or left-overs can be used. One of our Ohio Extension co-workers had put together a great chart with a “Basic Homemade Soup Recipe”. The neat thing about it is you select an ingredient from each column – vegetables, grains, protein, seasoning, and liquid. Here is a link to that site http://go.osu.edu/soup.

If you have left-over soup you want to get it in the refrigerator or freezer in less than 2 hours after serving. If there are large quantities, divide it into small or shallow containers for quicker cooling. Soup can be stored in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days and freezer for 2 to 3 months. Frozen soups should be stored in sealed containers and labeled with the date. Frozen soups should be thawed in the refrigerator or can be reheated from a frozen state. You may choose to add additional liquid if you reheat from frozen. Always make sure left-overs soups are brought to a boil and heated to 165 degrees for at least 15 seconds for food safety. If you use your microwave for thawing or heating soups, using a glass or ceramic container is recommended. Microwave thawed foods should be cooked right after thawing because they may start to partially cook during the thawing process.

What super soup can you make this week and how many superfood ingredients can you include?

Sources:

WebMD, Superfoods Everyone Needs, http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/superfoods-everyone-needs.

Ohio State University Extension, Wayne County, Basic Homemade Soup Recipe, D Becker,  http://go.osu.edu/soup.

USDA, Food Safety and Inspection Service, Freezer Storage Chart,  http://www.fsis.usda.gov/fact_sheets/Focus_On_Freezing/index.asp#19.

Written by:

Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ross & Vinton Counties, Ohio State University Extension, barlage.7@osu.edu.

Reviewers:

Jenny Even, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences/EFNEP, Hamilton County, Ohio State University Extension, even.2@osu.edu.

Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Butler County, green.1405@osu.edu.

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