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Posts Tagged ‘Tooth Decay’

I love any type of juice in the morning- grape, orange, apple, cranberry, punch. It gives me that quick energy that I need to jump start my day. Juice is naturally high in carbohydrates and calories, and also some antioxidant vitamins such as C and A which help the immune system, promote heart health, and prevent cancers. Citrus juice has B vitamins and minerals such as potassium which promote nerve and muscle health. Some juice products are fortified with calcium and vitamin D which are helpful to bones and teeth. Juices such as grape juice have other antioxidants and phytochemicals which are anti-inflammatory and can also promote healthy cardiovascular systems and prevent some cancers.

As someone who lives with type 1 diabetes, juice can also be helpful to have around in case I have a low blood sugar. With that in mind, I have to be especially mindful of serving sizes when I drink juice because it could also cause a spike in my blood sugar if I don’t take enough insulin. Most juice has about 30-40 grams of carbohydrate per 8 oz serving. 8 oz doesn’t look like much in today’s mega-glasses, many of which can easily hold 32 ounces! I normally will try to use an 8 oz glass when pouring juice. In addition to being high in carbohydrates, juice is also acidic, which is especially problematic for tooth decay. Experts recommend not brushing teeth until at least an hour after consuming acidic products.

Not all juice is created equal. Most experts recommend drinking 100% juice because vitamins and minerals are higher. However 100% juice is also high in fructose, naturally found in fruit. Many juice cocktails on the market have fewer carbohydrates since they contain added sweeteners and are still fortified with vitamins. Be sure to read labels when shopping for juice.

Fruit juice lacks an important nutrient found in whole fruit- fiber. Fiber helps the digestive system, lowers cholesterol, promotes a healthy colon, lowers blood sugar spikes, just to name a few benefits. Eating an orange or an apple will give you the fiber and also the juice!

Parents should be careful not to introduce juice too early to their children. The sugar in juice can be harmful to teeth, and too much can contribute to childhood obesity. Kids should get used to drinking water, low-fat milk, and other low-calorie products. Parents can also look for lower calories juice products.

Consider other alternatives to juice such as:

Fruit infused water or herbs

A splash of juice in a spritzer

Lemon infused water, with some honey or sweetner

Tea

Author:  Dan Remley, MSPH, PhD, Associate Professor and Field Specialist, OSU Extension

Reviewer: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Miami County, barton.345@osu.edu

Sources:

WebMD: Juices, the Best and Worst for Your Health. Retrieved on 9/8/20 from https://www.webmd.com/diet/ss/slideshow-juice-wars

WebMD: Choose Fruit Wisely. Retrieved on 9/8/20 from https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/features/fruit-diabetes-sugar

Remley, D. Nutrition and Dental Hygiene: Myths versus Facts. Retrieved on 9/8/20 from https://livehealthyosu.wordpress.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=12050&action=edit

Photo by PhotoMIX Company on Pexels.com

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cinnamonMany of us today are trying to find health tips for lowering cholesterol, lowering blood sugars, reducing arthritis pain and yes boosting our memory.  Many households in North America or Europe have cinnamon in their their cupboards.

 Cinnamon is the brown bark from  the cinnamon tree, which when dried, rolls into a tubular form known as a quill. Cinnamon is available in either its whole quill form (cinnamon sticks) or as ground powder.

Are all Cinnamon’s the same? What is the Best?

Cinnamon is one of the oldest spices and most popular spices, and has been used for a millennia both for its flavoring and medicinal qualities. The two major types of cinnamon used are Cassia and Ceylon cinnamon. Ceylon cinnamon is known as “true cinnamon”. Ceylon Cinnamon is NOT the kind of cinnamon that is normally sold in the spice section at your local supermarket.  Cassia is the one seen most often.   Cassia cinnamon contains coumarin, the parent compound of warfarin, a medication used to keep blood from clotting. Due to concerns about the possible effects of coumarin, in 2006, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment warned against consuming large amounts of cassia cinnamon.

Let’s Get to Using the Cinnamon!

Studies have shown that just ½ teaspoon Ceylon cinnamon added to cereal, oatmeal, toast, tomato sauces or on an apple can have many health benefits. These are just a few of the many ways you can add cinnamon to your meals. You might have your own special recipes!

  • Lowers Cholesterol: Studies have shown cinnamon may significantly lower LDL “bad” cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol.
  • Reduces blood sugar levels thus improving those with Type 2 Diabetes.
  • Heart Disease: Reducing blood pressure.
  • Fights Cancer: A study released by researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Maryland showed that cinnamon reduced the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells. Besides, the combination of calcium and fiber, Cinnamon can help to remove bile, which prevents damage to colon cells, thus prevents colon cancer.
  • Tooth decay and mouth freshener:  Treat toothache and fight bad breath.
  • Brain Tonic: Cinnamon boosts the activity of the brain and hence acts as a good brain tonic. It helps in removing nervous tension and memory loss. Also, studies have shown that smelling cinnamon may boost cognitive function, memory; performance of certain tasks and increases one’s alertness and concentration.
  • Reduces Arthritis Pain: Cinnamon spice contains anti-inflammatory compounds, which can be useful in reducing pain and inflammation associated with arthritis. A study conducted at Copenhagen University, where patients were given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week and could walk without pain within one month.
  • Itching: Paste of honey and cinnamon is often used to treat insect bites.

Share with us how you enjoy cinnamon! Enjoy the benefits of cinnamon today!

Resources:

http://nccam.nih.gov/sites/nccam.nih.gov/files/Herbs_At_A_Glance_Cinnamon_06-13-2012_0.pdf?nav=gsa

http://www.naturalfoodbenefits.com/display.asp?CAT=6&ID=113

http://naturalfamilytoday.com/nutrition/what-is-the-best-cinnamon-ceylon-vs-cassia-cinnamon/#ixzz2sfWvjw5w

http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/26/12/3215Alam Khan, MS, PHD, Mahpara Safdar, MS, Mohammad Muzaffar Ali Khan, MS, PHD, Khan Nawaz Khattak, MS and Richard A. Anderson, PHD. “Cinnamon Improves Glucose and Lipids of People With Type 2 Diabetes”. Diabetes Care. December 2003 vol. 26 no. 12 3215-3218. Accessed October 14th 2013.

Source: George RC, Lew J, Graves DJ. Interaction of Cinnamaldehyde and Epicatechin with Tau: Implications of Beneficial Effects in Modulating Alzheimer’s disease Pathogenesis. The Journal of Alzheimer’s disease. 2013.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center website: “About Herbs: Cinnamon.” Reviewed by Kimball Johnson, MD on October 13, 2012

Author: Marie Economos, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Trumbull County, Western Reserve, economos.2@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Liz Smith, M.S. R.D. L.D. NE Regional Program Specialist SNAP-ED, Ohio State University Extension

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Did you brush your teeth this morning?  Did you floss? brushing teeth

Most of us know we need to brush and floss, but we get in a rush. So, why is brushing our teeth so important.  We all know that brushing our teeth can prevent tooth decay.  What about other diseases?

Having good oral health can help prevent or lessen the chance of these diseases or problems:

  • Cardiovascular Disease – Gum disease (periodontitis) from oral bacteria may be a link to heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke according to some research.
  • Endocarditis – Gum disease may cause this infection to the inner lining of the heart
  • Premature birth and low birth weight has been linked to gum disease.
  • Alzheimer’s disease – Losing teeth before age 35 puts you at risk.
  • Osteoporosis may be associated with tooth loss and periodontal bone loss.
  • Having Diabetes increases your risk of gum disease.

So, we all need to work into our schedules brushing our teeth at least twice a day. Try to make one of those times be before you go to bed.  Use good technique taking time to do a thorough job.  (See tips below.)  You can use an electric/battery or manual toothbrush, whatever works best for you.  Foods that are acidic or contain sugar or starch can produce acids in your mouth that can harm tooth enamel for 20 minutes or more.  After consuming these foods avoid brushing your teeth for at least 30 minutes.

Floss your teeth at least once a day, as flossing helps decrease your risk of having gum disease and tooth decay.  Use whatever kind of floss or flossing tool works best for you.

Did you know your toothbrush could make you sick?  Here are a few tips to help you prevent that:

  • Wash your hands.  Be sure to wash your hands before and after to avoid spreading germs into your mouth and to others after brushing. toothbrush
  • Use a new toothbrush very four months.  Toothbrushes can wear out.  Replace your toothbrush after an illness..
  • After brushing rinse your toothbrush with water and store upright allowing it to air-dry. Don’t cover it until completely dry.  Store your toothbrush so that it doesn’t touch other toothbrushes.   Airborne bacteria grow well in the warm, moist environment like a bathroom.
  • Don’t share your toothbrush with others.  .
  • It is not necessary to sanitize your toothbrush using a mouthwash, sanitizer, dishwasher or microwave oven.
  • When someone is sick have them use a different  tube of  toothpaste, such as a travel size.  Sharing tubes of toothpaste can result in cross-contamination of germs.

Author:  Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Miami Valley EERA

Reviewed by:  Liz Smith, M.S., R.D., L.D. NE Regional Program Specialist, SNAP-ED, Ohio State University Extension.

References:

Delta Dental, [2012]. Can Your Toothbrush Make You Sick,  Downloaded from http://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/toothbrush.html on February 19, 2013.

Mayo Clinic Staff, [2011].  Electric Toothbrush:  Better than a Manual Toothbrush?  Answered by Alan Carr, D.M.D.,  Downloaded from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/electric-toothbrush/AN01705   on February 18, 2013.

Mayo Clinic Staff, [2011].  Oral health:  A Window to Your Overall Health, Downloaded from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001 on February 18, 2013.

Mayo Clinic Staff, [2011].  Oral Health:  Brush up on Dental Care Basics, Downloaded from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00003  on February 18, 2013.

Mayo Clinic Staff, [2010].  When to brush Your Teeth, Answered by Alan Carr, D.M.D., Downloaded from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/brushing-your-teeth/AN02098 on February 18, 2013

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