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Posts Tagged ‘travel safety’

Are you part of the over 90 million people who are hitting the roads in their cars to travel over the upcoming holiday? A little planning can help you to make this trip safe and even enjoyable for your family.

Before you go:Photo of car on snowy road.

  • Have your car maintained – check or change oil, tires, wipers, and fluids.
  • Carry a disaster supply kit – flash light, extra medications, bottled water or juices, cereal bars, blankets, first aid kit, and a fully charged portable cell charger are must haves!
  • Check the weather on your route and let other people know the travel route you plan to travel.
  • Pack healthier for you snacks to avoid drive-thru stops. Try cheese sticks, pretzels, nuts, fresh or dried fruit, veggie sticks, whole grain crackers, squeezable applesauce pouches, yogurt tubes that are pre-frozen, and bottled water or ice tea (not the southern-style variety).

As you roll out:

  • Make sure everyone is properly buckled in car seats or seat belts.
  • Don’t drive distracted, put cell phones away. If you are using it as a navigator – have a helper or pull over if you need to make changes or check routes.
  • Keep fuel tanks at least 25 to 30% full – you never know when weather will turn bad or you will get stuck in a traffic jam. (I admit to having a day when I thought I would fill up on my way back from Columbus instead of before I left, and then I got stuck in traffic. I watched the “Miles left sensor” tick down to less than 10 miles and then I quickly exited as soon as I could! Never again will I do that, it caused me great stress.)
  • Take breaks to change drivers and to keep everyone alert.
  • When you make stops, park in well-lit areas and try to keep valuables out of sight if possible.

Now that you are safely on your travel way – think about how you spend that time in the car. (The average long distance traveler goes 275 miles at Christmas.) I know there are many electronics available to keep everyone entertained – but why not use part of that travel time maintaining your family relationships by talking, singing, or playing travel games. Here are a few ideas that are free:

  • Play the license plate game, “I Spy with My Little Eye”, or the popular “I’m going on a trip and taking (then list items adding them in alphabetical order – apples, boots, change, doll – each person adds a new item and everyone must remember the whole list).
  • As your family ages – change the games to see who can name the most states and capitals, songs by a certain artist, books by an author, soccer/baseball/Olympic athletes on a team or in the Hall of Fame. My family of three includes a college-aged daughter, we often challenge each other to come up with the most songs by an artist, movies with a certain performer in them, or knowing what sports teams our favorite players used to be with.

While admitting that I love to use part of my travel time to read my latest book, spending a portion of trip talking with my family keeps the lines of communication open and strengthens our ties. I realize that electronic devices can keep families from fighting about what they are going to listen to, but those families also miss out on all those fun times we have enjoyed and that captive audience time to just talk about what is going on in your community/school/or with friends. I can’t wait to hear what your favorite travel game is – be creative and comment below!

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County.

 

Sources:

American Red Cross: http://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/highway-safety#Prepare-for-Driving

University of Delaware Extension: http://extension.udel.edu/factsheets/building-strong-family-relationships/

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Summer is a great time to travel with friends and family. Whether traveling domestically or internationally, here are a few tips to keep in mind for safe summer travels. The Center for Disease Control advises the 3 P’s for travelers. Be Proactive, Prepared and Protected.

BE PROACTIVE

Take steps to anticipate any issues that could arise during your trip.

BE PREPARED! (especially when travelling internationally)

No one wants to think about getting sick or hurt during a trip, but sometimes these things happen. You may not be able to prevent every illness or injury, but you can plan ahead to be able to deal with them.

Here are some ideas for a travel health kit:

Special note about prescription medicines

  • Pack your prescription medications in your carry-on luggage.
  • Pack copies of all prescriptions, including the generic names for medications.
  • Pack a note on letterhead stationery from the prescribing physician for controlled substances and injectable medications.
  • Leave a copy of your prescriptions at home with a friend or relative.
  • Check with the American Embassy or Consulate to make sure that your medicines will be allowed into the country you are visiting. Some countries do not let visitors bring certain medicines into the country.
  • Special prescriptions for the trip
    • Medicines to prevent malaria, if needed
    • Antibiotic prescribed by your doctor for self-treatment of moderate to severe diarrhea
  • Over the counter medicines
    • Antidiarrheal medication (for example, bismuth subsalicylate, loperamide)
    • Antihistamine
    • Decongestant, alone or in combination with antihistamine                                                                           moutains
    • Anti-motion sickness medication
    • Medicine for pain or fever (such as acetaminophen, aspirin, or ibuprofen)
    • Mild laxative
    • Cough suppressant/expectorant
    • Cough drops
    • Antacid
    • Antifungal and antibacterial ointments or creams
    • 1% hydrocortisone cream
  • Supplies to prevent illness or injury
    • Insect repellent containing DEET (30%-50%) or picaridin (up to 15%)
    • Sunscreen (preferably SPF 15 or greater) that has both UVA and UVB protection
    • Antibacterial hand wipes or alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol
    • Lubricating eye drops
  • First-aid supplies
    • First aid quick reference card
    • Basic first-aid items (bandages, gauze, ace bandage, antiseptic, tweezers, scissors, cotton-tipped applicators)
    • Moleskin for blisters
    • Aloe gel for sunburns
    • Digital thermometer
    • Oral rehydration solution packets
  • Health insurance card (either your regular plan or supplemental travel health insurance plan) and copies of claim forms
Other important items

Plan ahead for illnesses or injuries during your trip and know what to do if you become sick or injured

BE PROTECTED!

It is important to practice healthy behaviors during your trip

  • Use sunscreen and insect repellent as directed.
  • Be careful about food and water. Be mindful of foods that are rinsed with water
  • Try not to take risks with your health and safety.
  • Limit alcohol intake, and do not drink alcohol and drive.
  • Wear a seatbelt.
  • Wear protective gear when doing adventure activities.

For more information on safe travel information, check out the Center for Disease Control website: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/common-travel-health-topics

Source: Center for Disease Control

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/survival-guide

Prepared by: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, FCS, Wood County

Reviewed by: Daniel T. Remley, MSPH, PhD, Assistant Professor, Field Specialist.Food, Nutrition, and Wellness

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Beautiful Winter Snow Scene

Wintertime…….. Snow, Skiing, Sledding, Ice and Survival
It is a new year and now is a good time to plan for an emergency. It is better to be ready for the winter or an emergency BEFORE it happens.  What should you include in your emergency kit?
According to www.ready.gov, a basic emergency supply kit should include the following items:
Water – one gallon of water per person per day for at least 3 days, for drinking and sanitation
Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
Battery-powered or and crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
Flashlight and extra batteries
First aid kit
Whistle to signal for help
Dust masks to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
Manual can opener for food
Local maps
Cell phone with chargers, inverters or solar energy
Additional items may be needed if you have an infant or family member who is on a medication. Think about your family when planning your kit. Go to http://www.ready.gov/winter for more information. You will find additional ideas for your emergency kit.

Prepare for Winter    What about your car? 

If you live in an area where winter visits you, there are basic supplies that you need to put in your car.  In an emergency, it may just save your life.  Take a few minutes to gather these items and put them in a tote in your car.

  Winter Storm Survival Kit for Cars

Keep the following items in your car during the winter. Make sure you do not leave without them:

  • blankets/sleeping bags
  • high-calorie, non-perishable food (granola, nuts, candy bar)
  • flashlight with extra batteries
  • first aid kit
  • knife
  • extra clothing to keep dry
  • a large empty can and plastic cover with tissues and paper towels for sanitary purposes
  • a smaller can and water-proof matches to melt snow for drinking water;
  • sack of sand (or cat litter)
  • shovel
  • windshield scraper and brush
  • tool kit
  • tow rope
  • booster cables
  • water container
  • compass
  • road maps

Take these simple steps to Resolve to be Ready.  In an emergency, you will be glad you did!

Writer:  Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension.

Sources: http://www.ready.gov/winter

http://www.fema.gov/

http://web.extension.illinois.edu/disaster/winter/ws_surv.html

Emergency Kit

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