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Posts Tagged ‘weight loss’

At the beginning of January, I shared Baby-steps To A Healthier You. I wanted to make smaller weekly goals to help me reach my overall goal. By doing so, I’m able to feel more successful and increase my motivation. For my first weekly goal, I was going to eat a healthy breakfast every morning. I was then going to take my second week to evaluate any triggers or life changes that kept me from reaching my goal and make needed changes in what I’m eating. Here’s my update:

I have found it very important to develop an action plan and to come up with my own personal vision statement. This way, when I start to become discouraged, I can be reminded of the bigger picture and focus on my weekly goals. The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center has a really great handout for healthy living that they use with patients who are working towards losing weight.  You can follow along in the handout to answer questions and create your own personal vision statement. My vision statement is:

I am adopting a healthy lifestyle of eating to nourish my body and exercising to be fit. I will inspire through example and love the life I live. I will achieve it, be it, and live it!

My vision statement is on my desk at work and I have posted it on my refrigerator at home. I see and am reminded of my positive vision multiple times a day.

How did I do with my breakfast goal? Well… I learned that I like to hit the snooze button too many times, which causes me to be in a hurry for breakfast. When I’m in a hurry, I tend to grab something quick to take out the door with me. I found that I really want something hot for breakfast, and I need to make sure it contains protein. If I don’t get enough protein with breakfast, I crave carbohydrates all day!

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has a great article about Breakfast Ideas for Busy Mornings that give you options based on how many times you hit the snooze button. Here are my new quick, hot, PROTEIN-PACKED go-to breakfasts:

  1. Breakfast Burrito– low carb tortilla with either one scrambled egg or two egg whites, a lean meat (like chopped, low-fat ham), and a little sprinkle of shredded cheese. If I’m doing well on time I will add in some veggies like spinach, onions, peppers, or broccoli while I cook my egg.
  2. Protein Packed Pancakes– I blend up old-fashioned oats with low-fat cottage cheese, vanilla, egg whites and baking powder to make a protein packed pancake. I do this the night before and get everything ready so it takes no time to cook in the morning.
  3. Veggie Egg Breakfast Muffins are great to make on the weekend, and they heat up quick on busy mornings.
Veggie Egg Breakfast Muffins

Veggie Egg Breakfast Muffins

I’d love to hear how you’re coming with your goal and what has worked for you!

 

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension,  Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

 

Sources:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (2017). Tips for Better Breakfasts. http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/planning-and-prep/snack-and-meal-ideas/4-tips-for-better-breakfasts

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015). Losing Weight: Getting Started. https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/losing_weight/getting_started.html

Zies, S. (2017). A Great Way to Start your Day. Live Healthy, Live Well. https://livehealthyosu.com/2017/09/14/a-great-way-to-start-your-day/

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The new year is upon us which means everyone has made their New Year’s Resolution. Did you make yours about weight loss? Every year mine revolves around weight loss. Weight loss and I have a love-hate relationship. Some years are good and other years not so much.  I would like to share with you my personal struggles and how we can work together to lead healthier lives.

A few years ago I worked really hard at following a weight loss program and lost 40 pounds. I felt amazing! I had more energy and my self-confidence really improved. However, the next year, work became very stressful. Over the following years, I’ve gained all of it back, plus a little more, through emotional eating and other life changes. I self-sabotage my efforts. I don’t just fall off the “diet” band wagon; I fall off and set it on FIRE! It’s a vicious cycle that I’m putting an end to now.

Maybe you’re like me and have made decisions in the past to crash diet, and you’ve messed up your metabolism. You weigh yourself every week and when the weight isn’t coming off fast enough you feel a sense of failure and give up.

As a professional, I know and have read all the right things to do. There are blog posts on Healthy Habits and articles on how to Start Losing Weight.  But, old habits are hard to break. Personally, I have a major sweet tooth and sugar is very addicting.

Today, I’m asking you to join me in taking baby-steps to a healthier you. It may take longer, but the tortoise beat the hare, remember?

My plan of action is to make small changes over a certain period of time. I want to give myself time to take action and evaluate my success. I also want to identify my unhealthy eating triggers. Therefore, I’m allowing myself two weeks to make each change. This way I can make a small change the first week and then brainstorm ways to avoid unhealthy triggers the second week. I will start by changing my breakfast foods, then I will move onto snacks, dinner, lunch, and finally, beverages.

Since I’m starting with breakfast, I’ve identified a couple of go-to recipes I plan to use to give myself a kick start:

1. For mornings on the run, I’ll grab a low-fat Greek Yogurt, a small piece of fruit, and a piece of Sprouted toast with a small smear of all-fruit jam. Personally, I have found that sprouted bread is more gentle on my blood sugar. However, you could substitute your favorite whole grain bread.

french toast

2. For Saturday morning breakfast with my family, I love to make Cinnamon-French Toast. I’ll again use sprouted bread, and I’ll replace the whole eggs with egg whites. A little light syrup and some fresh berries will make this feel like such a treat!

3. Some days I’m way ahead of the game and have Overnight Oatmeal in the refrigerator ready to go.

What are your favorite go-to breakfasts?

 

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Jenny Lobb, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension,  Franklin County, lobb.3@osu.edu

 

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2015). Losing Weight: Getting Started. https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/losing_weight/getting_started.html

Godman, H. (2017). Are Sprouted Grains More Nutritious than Regular Whole Grains? Harvard Health Publishing. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/sprouted-grains-nutritious-regular-whole-grains-2017110612692

Spires, C. (2016). Diets or Healthy Habits? Live Healthy, Live Well. https://livehealthyosu.com/2016/10/24/diets-or-healthy-habits/

 

 

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Knowwaisting that long-term weight management to maintain good health is important, we should be able to determine whether the guidelines/programs of popular diets are set up to be healthy habits for a lifetime or a fad diet that is all hype and will provide only a short-term fix.

Health Risks Fad Diets, and Yo-Yo Dieting

  • Long term weight gain
  • Eating disorders
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies like anemia
  • Fatigue

Determining a Fad Diet

  • Does the diet promise quick weight loss?
  • Does the diet sound too good to be true?
  • Does the diet help sell a company’s product?
  • Does the diet lack valid scientific research to support its claims?
  • Does the diet give lists of “good” and “bad” foods?

If you can answer “YES” to any or all of these questions, the diet is probably a fad diet.

History of Fad Diets

Women’s Day report on Bizarre Diets in History:

  • 1727 – Avoiding Swamps
  • 1800’s – Starvation or Hysteria
  • 1820 – The Vinegar Diet
  • 1903 – Fletcherizing
  • 1925 – The Cigarette Diet
  • 1928 – The Inuit Meat-and-Fat Diet
  • Early 1930’s – Slimming Soap
  • 1954 – The Tapeworm Diet
  • 1960’s – The Sleeping Beauty Diet
  • 1961 – The Calories Don’t Count Diet
  • 1970s – The Prolinn Diet or the The Last Chance Diet
  • 1980’s – 2000’s – Breatharian Diet
  • 2000’s – The Vision Diet
  • 2000’s – Ear Stapling
  • 2000’s – The Cotton Ball Diet

Other Diets that Have Made the Rounds:

The Dukan Diet

  • Sources say royal members have followed it.
  • It has been a French Best-Seller for several years.
  • A diet with 4 stages, low in calories and high in protein.
  • Promotes lean protein, oat bran and water intake along with a daily 20-minute walk.

HCG Diet

  • Uses a hormone, (human chorionic gonadotropin) found during pregnancy, to help people lose weight & maintain weight loss.
  • 26 day treatment with 23 days of injections of HcG AND cut calorie intake to 500 Calories/day.
  • FDA-approved only for – fertility!!
  • Most report no fewer hunger pangs than those receiving a placebo and calories must continue to be low in order to lose more and maintain weight loss.

Low Carbohydrate Diets

  • Atkins Diet
  • Sugar-Busters Diet
  • South Beach Diet

soup

Cabbage Soup Diet

  • 7-day plan
  • Very few, specific foods allowed each day
  • Will lose 10-12 pounds in the week
  • Have not changed any lifestyle habits, and have lost mostly fluid
  • Soup and other allowed foods will cause gas

The Recommendations:

Assessment of weight and health risk involves using three key measures under the care of a physician or dietitian:

  • Body mass index (BMI)
  • Waist circumference
  • Risk factors for diseases and conditions associated with obesity

A Healthy Weight Is Needed to:

  • Reduce your risk of disease and health problems.
  • Help you feel better physically and mentally
  • Helps you enjoy life

Choosing a Safe, Reliable Weight-Loss Plan and/or Choosing Good Health at Any Size

  • Healthy eating
    plans that reduce calories but do not forbid specific foods or food groups.
  • Tips to increase moderate-intensity physical activity.
  • Tips on healthy habits that also keep your cultural needs in mind, such as lower-fat versions of your favorite foods.
  • Slow and steady weight loss. Depending on your starting weight, experts recommend losing weight at a rate of 1/2 to 2 pounds per week. Weight loss may be faster at the start of a program.
  • Medical care if you are planning to lose weight by following a special formula diet, such as a very low-calorie diet (a program that requires careful monitoring frompeople-1230872_1280-1 a doctor).
  • A plan to keep the weight off after you have lost it.
  • Perhaps, weight loss is not the correct choice for you. Good health can be found at many sizes and choosing to live healthfully at a higher or lower weight may be the best decision.  Check out more at the University of New Hampshire.

Where to Look for Help:

  • Registered Dietitians
  • Primary Care Physicians
  • choosemyplate.gov
  • eatright.org

Author:  Cheryl Barber Spires, R.D., L.D., Ohio State University Extension, spires.53@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Daniel T. Remley, MSPH, PhD, Ohio State University Extension, remley.4@osu.edu

Sources:

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Four year olds can be frustrating at times especially when it comes to eating. I can remember when my four year old daughter would simply refuse to eat at the dinner time. “I’m not hungry daddy” she quipped as she would play with her food. As a parent I would have a few options a.) make her stay at the table until she finishes her plate, b.) send her to bed without supper, or c.) put her food in the refrigerator for later. The correct answer is “c.”

In most cases, children, toddlers and infants are actually better “intuitive eaters” than adults. In other words, they respond better to hunger and fullness cues. Unfortunately for adults, our eating habits have been corrupted by our environments. How so?

  • We grew up in the “clean plate club.” Our moms and dads made us finish everything on our plates. Today, portion sizes keep getting bigger (in 2050 a regular soda at the movies will fill a water cooler jug if current trend continues) and these values, although helpful during times of hardship, might contribute to eating too much.

Picture1

  • We eat to cope with emotions. When food is plentiful, we eat when we are stressed or bored. Although this behavior is normal in moderation, it is problematic if it happens too much.
  • We eat too quickly. This was a problem in my family growing up- my dad and I would finish before my mom sat down at the table. Today, our environment promotes fast eating. We have only so much time at work for lunch and our children, in some cases, have only ten to fifteen minutes to eat at school. Eating quickly does not allow us to respond to our fullness cues and again we might eat too much.
  • We skip meals all together. Many skip breakfast and lunch and eat only one meal a day. By the time dinner arrives, well let’s just say horses better hide! Sometimes, people can eat more in one meal than eating smaller meals throughout the day.
  • We go on extreme weight loss diets. In a culture of “thinness” the temptation is to go on diets where food is restricted and hunger cues are ignored. For many this promotes obesity because the body may become more efficient at converting food to fat when normal eating patterns return after the diet.
  • We practice “distracted” eating. We eat when we drive; we eat in front of the T.V.  and at events. In these situations, we are distracted from our hunger and fullness.

According to the CDC, obesity and associated chronic diseases such as diabetes are growing problems in all demographic groups. Although the etiology of problem is complex, our environment that discourages intuitive eating is a factor. We eat way too much and do not get enough physical activity. According to “Health for Every Body” developed by University of Missouri Extension, there are several things that families can do to promote intuitive eating for health and wellness:

  • Avoid distracted eating by encouraging family meals. According to Thriving Newsletter by University of Missouri Extension, several studies have demonstrated that families that eat together at the table actually are healthier.
  • Avoid extreme weight loss diets. Rather, set behavior goals rather than weight goals. For example try to set a weekly walking goal than a goal to lose 10 pounds in a week. In addition, your children will not model your dieting which could potentially lead to an eating disorder.
  • Eat breakfast. Research clearly shows that those who eat breakfast have better health outcomes.
  • Slow down. Put your utensils down between bites. Pay attention to your hunger and fullness.
  • Pay attention to emotional eating. Find other healthy behaviors such as walking to replace food. Snack on healthy food such as fruits or vegetables.

Dan Remley, MSPH, PhD

Assistant Professor, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness

OSU Extension

 

Reviewed by Susan Zies, Extension Educator

OSU Extension, Wood County

Sources: A New You: Health for Every Body, University of Missouri Extension

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The Dietary Guidelines encourage you to enjoy your food, but eat less and avoid oversized portions. We all know how tempting it is to finish your large sandwich, beverage, or large bagel. These oversized portions can contribute to weight gain.

If you want to maintain or lose weight, try some of these strategies:

• Eat smaller portions – can you split a breakfast or dinner entrée?
• Fill half your plate with vegetables – summertime is here; fill up on local vegetables and fruits.

Caprese Sandwich• Offer smaller portions for your sandwiches. These Caprese sandwiches were offered at a bridal shower. Fresh tomatoes and mozzarella cheese with balsamic vinegar made these small sandwiches a hit. They were wrapped in parchment paper and tied with jute so that they were easy to pick up.

• Fill up on salads! Eat darker lettuce varieties or use a Spring Mix Salad. Add fresh strawberries or berries and nuts for a nice crunch. Encourage guests to “drizzle” a little dressing on the salad for added flavor. When you have a variety of flavors in a salad, you may use less dressing. Spring Mix Salad

• Enjoying dessert? Split your dessert or eat a smaller portion. Take your time to savor the taste of your treat.

Want to learn more? Take the Portion Distortion Quiz from US Department of Health and Human Services, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. You will see pictures of food and how portion sizes have expanded over the past 20 years.

Make a decision to eat more veggies and fruits and watch your portion sizes!

Writer: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Marilyn Rabe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

Sources:

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/wecan/eat-right/portion-distortion.htm

http://www.choosemyplate.gov/weight-management-calories/weight-management/better-choices/decrease-portions.html

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Do you ever find yourself eating and realize that you don’t even feel hungry or don’t know why you started eating in the first place? If so, don’t feel guilty, you are not alone. Recent studies suggest that over 75% of overeating is caused by our emotions. Instead of eating due to physical cues from our bodies, such as a growling stomach, emotional eating is when our feelings trigger us to indulge and typically cause us to eat unhealthy foods. Studies show that we turn to comfort foods that are sweet, high-fat foods in response to emotional stress. Many of us are programmed to turn to food for comfort at an early age. As an infant we are held in the security of a loved one’s arms while eating, this begins the emotional phase of eating. As a young child, our family doctor gives a lollipop as a reward at the end of a visit, and some teacher’s celebrate classroom success with pizza or ice cream parties. It’s no wonder we learn to eat to satisfy emotions and not our body’s physical need for nourishment.
Emotional eating is one of the largest weight loss obstacles. Depression, boredom, loneliness, chronic anger, anxiety, frustration, stress, problems with interpersonal relationships, and low self-esteem can result in overeating and weight gain. When we ignore our body’s physical cues and eat anytime we feel bored, emotional, or stressed, our body receives unwanted extra calories which are then stored as excess fat leading to increased weight gain and health risks. Even when you feel full, if you are eating to fulfill an emotional need, you are more likely to continue eating. If you eat because you are physically hungry, you are more likely to stop when you are full.
Rather than reaching for those comfort foods, we must develop new skills for dealing with boredom, stress, and self-esteem issues. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has some suggestions to help you battle emotional eating:

sweeets
1. Create a list of your eating habits. Keeping a food diary for a few days, in which you write down everything you eat and the time of day you ate it, will help you uncover your habits. Use this diary to help: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/pdf/food_diary_cdc.pdf It’s good to note how you were feeling when you decided to eat, especially if you were eating when not hungry. Were you tired? Stressed out?

2. Highlight the habits on your list that may be leading you to overeat. Look at the unhealthy eating habits you’ve highlighted. Be sure you’ve identified all the triggers that cause you to engage in those habits. Identify a few you’d like to work on improving first.

3. Replace unhealthy habits with new, healthy ones. For example, in reflecting on your eating habits, you may realize that you eat too fast when you eat alone. So, make a commitment to share a lunch each week with a colleague, or have a neighbor over for dinner one night a week. If you find yourself eating when you are experiencing an emotion besides hunger, such as boredom or anxiety, try to find a non-eating activity to do instead. Take a walk, enjoy a book or spend time on a hobby.

4. Reinforce your new, healthy habits and be patient with yourself. Habits take time to develop. It doesn’t happen overnight. When you do find yourself engaging in an unhealthy habit, stop as quickly as possible and ask yourself: Why do I do this? When did I start doing this?
Lastly, don’t deny yourself all treats. This can lead to cravings and binge eating. Instead, allow yourself to have your favorite foods occasionally and in smaller portions. Limit the amount of chips or candy by putting a few in a small bowl instead of mindlessly eating them out of the bag.


Sources:
Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2013). Healthy Weight-it’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/losing_weight/eating_habits.html
Oliver, G., Wardle, J., & Gibson, E.L. (2000). Stress and food choice: A laboratory study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 62, 853-865.

Writer: Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Butler County, Miami Valley EERA, green.1405@osu.edu
Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, Heart of Ohio EERA, treber.1@osu.edu

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One of the hardest issues to deal with when you’re trying to lose weight is achieving satiety (how “full” you feel after eating). It has been a problem for me for decades because I am a very fast eater. Anyone else out there like that?? I can inhale a meal in literally five minutes. This is problematic because it takes 15-20 minutes for your stomach to signal your brain that you have had enough food. Because I eat so fast, I used to still feel hungry after one plate of food. Then I would go back to the kitchen for seconds. Unfortunately, after a second round of food, I didn’t feel very good. I felt stuffed the way most of us do on Thanksgiving Day. I finally hit rock bottom a couple of years ago. I knew I was probably not going to eat more slowly, so I had to learn to control the amount of food I ate.

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