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Posts Tagged ‘Wellness’

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While scanning the paper recently, an obituary caught my eye:

“After 96 years of vigorous living, Ralph passed peacefully. His enthusiasm for life was contagious. He made friends easily wherever he went.  He made a difference in people’s lives, challenging people to do their best in business, sports, in their families and even in their fun.   He mentored many associates both young and old.  Believing in the rights and dignity of all, he organized an open housing committee at the peak of the civil rights movement in the 1960’s. His family was the most important part of his life, especially his wife with whom everyday was a party. Their life together was fun. Join us to celebrate his life at the 18th green with a reception to follow in the clubhouse.”

After reading this, I wondered.  Are we living our best life? We all want to live better, more fulfilling and happier lives. Are we taking the time and necessary steps to achieve these goals?

Start today:

  • Be grateful
  • Be kind to others
  • Get enough sleep
  • Spend more time with loved ones
  • Smile more
  • Forgive
  • Exercise
  • Eat well
  • Spread positive energy
  • Get more sleep
  • Get fresh air
  • Volunteer
  • Enjoy a part of everyday

We only get one life. Forget about what other people are doing and focus on your life and your path to happiness.  At the end of the day and at the end of your life, that is all that matters.

I wish I had known Ralph.   He has inspired me to live my best life.  Thank you Ralph.

Written by:  Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/choosing-to-be-happy#1

https://www.franklincovey.com/the-7-habits.html

 

 

 

 

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Definition of nudge: to touch or push (someone or something) gently: to encourage (someone) to do something. ~Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Setting health and wellness goals are common when we start a new year. Many of us make New Year Resolutions. For several years, I’ve encouraged people to set a resolution or goal and go for it. We’ve discussed ways to achieve your goal, as well as possible barriers and opportunities. Did you set a New Years’ Resolution? If so, how are you doing with that goal?

We are over the midpoint in the year and I’d like to encourage you to consider taking a small step (or two) to improve your health. If you are like me (and most of us) you are busy and health practices may take a backseat in our lives. I’d like to “nudge” you to get back on track with your wellness goals.

Not sure where to start? Is there an easy habit that you could add or change? Sometimes if we start with a simple change, the next wellness change is easier to make. We gain momentum as we start to feel better and our confidence increases. Here are some suggestions for easy changes to help you get started:

  • Enjoy water at meals – not only will you save money while eating out, this helps you get increase your daily water intake.
  • Add a veggie or fruit snack to your day. Pack a bag of carrots, an apple, banana or mini cucumber to enjoy as a snack break.
  • When ordering a salad, ask for your dressing on the side and dip your fork into your dressing. You will save calories and it may help you slow the pace of eating. When you are finished, look at the amount of dressing left over. Any surprises?
  • Take a walk at lunch. Start with 10 minutes. See if getting a quick walk in helps you feel refocused and energized. Add more time to your walk and see those benefits.
  • Set a timer (phone, watch, or computer) to get up and move every hour. See if this helps you stay energized throughout the day.
  • Pack a low-fat yogurt (watch the amount of sugar in your yogurt) to enjoy as a healthy snack. This will help you get the 3-a-day recommended servings of dairy.
  • Enjoy your pizza with extra veggies. If you love pepperoni on your pizza, make half veggie, half pepperoni and mix it up. We’ve transitioned to a veggie only pizza in our house.
  • Take a day and declare it “soda free”. Enjoy flavored water, tea, or other beverages. A few years ago, I made the decision that I wouldn’t drink pop anymore. It was a tough habit to break but sparkling water and tea helped me make this change.
  • Engage a friend for support. Tell a friend (email, text, in person, or on the phone) about your new health change and gain support. Stating the goal or change that you are making will help you stay accountable. It may even encourage them to make a change, too.

Still not sure where to start? Check out the new on-line tool on MyPlate.

In a few minutes, you will have a MyPlate Plan to help you find a Healthy Eating Style. I like that my plan told me how many cups of fruits and vegetables that I need each day.

Want a few more ideas of small changes you can make? Here are two links to help you get started:

30 MyPlate Steps to a Healthier You

Check out the ChooseMyPlate website and explore the Make Small Changes section.

You will find short video clips, comparisons, recipes and more. Just click on one of these sections:

Are you ready to enjoy a healthier lifestyle? Start with a small change, and “nudge” others to make one simple switch for better health.

Sources:

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/what-are-myplate-mywins

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/make-small-changes

https://food.unl.edu/30-myplate-steps-healthier-you

 

Written by: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Shannon Carter, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County, carter.413@osu.edu

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The last couple of weeks have been spent moving from a home with 20 years accumulation of “stuff” to a new home. While it has been exciting, it has also been exhausting.  I realized a few days ago that I was staying up later than usual to unpack and rearrange items and then not falling asleep when I did go to bed. My mind kept racing thinking about everything I needed – or wanted – to do the next day. The result was a tired, somewhat grumpy version of me!

Eating well and being physically active are two basic activities that we think of when we discuss being healthy.  Something that is often overlooked is the importance that a good night’s sleep plays in our overall health. Research has shown that insufficient sleep increases the risk of disorders, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, stroke and depression. It’s also associated with cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.

Most of us have heard that all adults need 7 – 8 hours of sleep each night. That generally holds true but it is important to remember that the quality of your sleep is just as, if not more, important than the quantity!  You should feel rested when you wake up in the morning. It is important to listen to your body’s biological clock which is set by the hours of daylight where you live. This should make it easier for you to stay awake during the day and sleep at night.

There will be times that you find it more difficult to fall asleep than others. If you are under stress, experiencing pain from an injury or illness, consuming excess caffeine or alcohol, you may find that falling and staying asleep are difficult. In that case, recognizing the reasons and making some adjustments to your daytime activities should help you sleep more soundly.

Some suggestions for improving your sleep:

  • Create a comfortable, calming sleep environment. This could include room darkening window coverings.
  • Avoid electronic devices in your bedroom – computers, tablets, games, etc. should be shut down before bedtime.
  • Establish a routine that you follow each evening to help you fall asleep and stay asleep.
  • Have a consistent bed time – even on the weekends.

There are small changes you can make to your daytime activities that may lead to better sleep.

  • Try to spend some time outdoors every day.
  • Exercise earlier in the day instead of later in the evening.
  • If you nap, limit yourself to 20 minutes or less.
  • Avoid both caffeine and alcohol close to your chosen bed time. Do some experimenting to find the cut off time for you – everyone will be a little different!
  • If you smoke, quit! Nicotine in cigarettes can make sleep more difficult.

If you continue to have sleep problems, it might be wise to visit your doctor to be sure you don’t have a more serious sleep disorder.

While sleep is not a guaranteed cure all for you, it doesn’t hurt anyone to establish sleep habits that help you consistently get a good night’s sleep!

 

WRITTEN BY: Marilyn Rabe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

REVIEWED BY: Michelle Treber, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, treber.1@osu.edu

Sources:

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2017/10/cover-sleep.aspx

https://healthfinder.gov/healthtopics/population/men/mental-health-and-relationships/get-enough-sleep#the-basics_2

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/ask-the-doctor-right-amount-of-sleep

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How did you start your day? I started mine with a visit to the dermatologist. Several months ago (you must plan at least 2-4 months in advance to see a specialist), I decided since it had been 10+ years since my first and only one, I should get an overall skin check. I called the doctor’s office. Since my insurance had changed, I had to verify the doctor was an approved provider. Sure enough he was, so long as the office bills the visit a certain way. As if trying to find a day and time that worked for the visit wasn’t hard enough, I also had to figure out how the office bills! I persisted and was able to confirm that they bill the way the insurance requires. At last, my visit was set! calendar-1763587_1280

You may be wondering why I decided I should go to the dermatologist. I admit, I have a few spots that were of slight concern, but I mainly wanted to get a complete skin check to make sure there were no suspicious areas. My grandpa and my dad both had pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions removed from the ears and the nose. I have always enjoyed being outside and I have not always been diligent about wearing sunscreen or protective clothing. I also have lots of small moles. These all put me at an increased risk for skin cancer.

Well, after meeting the new-to-me doctor, and getting my skin check, I am happy to report that I have no areas of concern. He did point out a few areas for me to be aware and to note if they start to change in color, size or shape. Overall, he confirmed what I already know. I have some spots that are most likely a combination of sun exposure and time. I need to wear sunscreen and protective clothing whenever I go outside. When I am near water, which I am as much as possible in the summer, reflective rays from the sun hit the water and bounce back up, increasing my sun exposure. I had not given much thought to this in the past, but I will definitely pay attention to it now. Overall, the visit was pleasant, informative and reassuring.sun

If you are someone who dreads going to the doctor for any reason, you may want to reconsider. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), regular health exams and tests can help find problems before they start. They can also catch issues earlier when they are easier to treat. The National Institute for Health (NIH) provides a list of screenings based on your age and gender. The list tells you what kinds of tests or exams you should have and how often. You should work with your physician(s) to decide how often you need to schedule a visit.

I know that after my experience, I will not wait 10+ years before I schedule my next appointment. I am relieved that I have no areas of concern right now. I feel empowered to take steps to care for my skin and to try to prevent further damage. I know which areas that I especially need to watch. So, if you have been putting off making an appointment for a routine visit, call your doctor’s office today. It may take several months before you can be seen.

Written by: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County.

Reviewed by: Shannon Carter, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County.

Sources:

cdc.gov/cancer/skin/

 

medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002125.htm

References:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (November 13, 2017). Skin Cancer, cdc.gov

 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. (February 6, 2018). Physical exam frequency. . U.S. National Library of Medicine, medline.gov

Photo Credit:

https://pixabay.com/en/calendar-date-month-day-week-1763587/

https://pixabay.com/en/sun-sunbeam-sky-clouds-light-1651316/

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chaos2We all experience chaos in our lives, some of us more so than others.  Examples include the car breaking down, refrigerator going on the fritz, accidently overdrawing your checking account, and receiving unexpected visitors.  The list goes on.

However, for the past five weeks I have been experiencing an abnormal amount of disorder in my life.  I sold my home six months ago and bought a new home a few months later.  I moved in right when the holidays were starting (moving + holiday stress), and had just started getting situated when the extreme cold weather moved in.  Just normal Ohio January weather, right?

Well, let’s just say that sometimes Mother Nature can be very vindictive.  It started with a water pipe bursting above my ceiling.  Water was running down the walls of my home onto my furniture, carpeting, and personal effects.  Then problems with the furnace and refrigerator followed.  Those issues led to almost daily phone calls and emails to resolve damage issues, and ultimately having to take lots of vacation time to get those problems resolved (or close to being resolved).

Situations that disrupt our lives – even positive occasions – can be stressful.  The major constant distressing factors in our lives include:

  • Death of a loved one
  • Birth of a child
  • New job and loss of a job
  • Marriage and divorce
  • Major illness and caring for a sick family member
  • Moving

So how do we get through those times when it keeps raining, so to speak, and just won’t quit?

During this chaotic time my back seized up on me (stress related) and I was told to “keep moving.”  I also coped by getting a few back massages and did some “Yoga for Your Back.”   Prayer, remembering to breath in and out, exercise, and talking with others helped.

But what is really helping me get through this more-than-usual chaotic time is living one moment at a time, one hour at a time, and one day at a time.  You and I know that sometimes that is all we are able to do.

Written by:  Candace J. Heer, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Morrow County

Reviewed by:  Donna Green, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County

Resources:

References:

 

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TomPuppy2

My brother-in-law and sister had to put their beloved dog to sleep a few months ago. Needless to say, this was a sad time for them. Tom (my brother-in-law) recently shared an observation about his weight during this time. When . they had to put their dog, Chippy to sleep, his average weight was 199. He noticed a weight gain of 9-10 pounds after this time. Since they brought home a new puppy, Chummy, his weight has dropped by 5 pounds!

What does this have to do with your health? According to the American Heart Association, owning a pet – a dog, in particular, can be good for your heart health.  This article supports the findings that my brother-in-law recently shared with me. The CDC also reports that having a pet can decrease your blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides levels and decrease your feelings of loneliness.

These factors may contribute to his recent weight loss:

  • Taking a walk at least twice a day with Chummy
  • Enjoying the social interaction with the new puppy
  • Spending time with the puppy which makes it easier to avoid snacking

If you can’t have or don’t want a pet, what can you do to improve your heart health? Go back to the basics:

Enjoy physical activity most days of the week for at least 30 minutes. It is fine to break up the 30 minutes into three 10-minute sessions. Adults should aim for 150 minutes per week.

Eat a diet rich in vegetables and fruits. Enjoy a wide variety of nutrient rich veggies & fruits. Be creative with the way you add them to your day. Start the day with a fruit or veggie for breakfast (think smoothie, veggies added to eggs, or a piece of fresh fruit).

Need more help? Visit MyPlate’s SuperTracker to customize your food and activity plan. It is free and easy and will help you on your wellness journey.

While you are enjoying the health benefits from you new (or old) pet, don’t forget basic cleanliness habits to keep you and your family from becoming ill. One reminder from CDC is to wash your hands after handling your pet, pet food or treats or if you pick up their stools.  Not sure how to wash your hands? Here are the basics on handwashing from CDC:

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water (warm or cold), turn off the tap, and apply soap.
  • Lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Do you need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel or air dry them

Are these good reasons to get a pet? Yes! Remember that if you are ready for a new furry family member, it just might help your health!

Sources:

http://heartinsight.heart.org/Fall-2017/Is-Owning-a-Pet-Good-for-You/

https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/health-benefits/

https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/pets/dogs.html

https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/when-how-handwashing.html

https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/resources/pet-food-tips_8x11_508.pdf

https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/myplan.aspx

Writer: Michelle Treber, OSU Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Pickaway County, Heart of Ohio EERA, treber.1@osu.edu

Reviewer: Marilyn Rabe, OSU Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Franklin County, Heart of Ohio EERA, rabe.9@osu.edu

 

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all-is-wellWhat comes to mind when you hear the terms well or wellness? For most people, these words bring thoughts of physical health. Some of you will think about mental health. Most people, when given time, realize that there is more to being well than just physical and mental health. Some may even be able to name several areas of wellness. Many people may not realize that there are actually eight dimensions of wellness, though.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the eight dimensions of wellness are:

  1. Emotional—Coping effectively with life and creating satisfying relationships
  2. Environmental—Good health by occupying pleasant, stimulating environments that support well-being
  3. Financial—Satisfaction with current and future financial situations
  4. Intellectual—Recognizing creative abilities and finding ways to expand knowledge and skills
  5. Occupational—Personal satisfaction and enrichment from one’s work
  6. Physical—Recognizing the need for physical activity, healthy foods, and sleep
  7. Social—Developing a sense of connection, belonging, and a well-developed support system
  8. Spiritual—Expanding a sense of purpose and meaning in life

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For about a month, I have been participating in a program offered through my employer/health insurance to help increase my emotional well-being. There are up to five areas that anyone who participates can choose to complete. Each area has suggestions for things you can do. For example, one challenge is to find. Some things listed include: going to the library to check out a book or DVD, attending a live event or stopping by a new coffee shop. It is fun trying to complete each challenge. It also helps remind me that even on those hectic days, I need to take some time to take care of myself.

There are small and simple things you can do to help become more well in each area. Here are some examples:

  • Emotional—unplug from phone, social media and your computer for 10 minutes each day, light your favorite candle and make time for friends and family
  • Environmental—keep your office and home clean and organized, find a favorite place or spot to visit and get involved in cleaning up your community or neighborhood
  • Financial—shop at thrift stores, limit unnecessary spending and develop a budget
  • Intellectual—read for pleasure, choose creative hobbies and participate in local/community events
  • Occupational—attend conferences to stay current in your profession and explore opportunities for growth and advancement
  • Physical—participate in regular exercise/physical activity that you enjoy, eat balanced, nutritious meals and snacks and get adequate sleep
  • Social—be genuine with others, join a club or organization and use good communication skills
  • Spiritual—volunteer, pray, meditate or find a quiet place for self-reflection

You may be wondering how well you really are. Take this assessment to get a better idea. After completing it, you can figure out which areas you need to work on and in which ones you are already strong. Click here for additional information and resources on how to strengthen your dimensions of wellness.

Author:  Misty Harmon, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Perry County

Reviewer:  Michelle Treber, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, Pickaway County

References:

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2016). The Eight Dimensions of Wellness. Available at https://www.samhsa.gov/wellness-initiative/eight-dimensions-wellness

http://umatter.princeton.edu/sites/umatter/files/media/wellness-self-assessment.pdf

Roddick, M. (2016). The 8 Dimensions of Wellness:  Where Do You Fit In? Available at https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/8-dimensions-of-wellness-where-do-you-fit-in-0527164

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