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Posts Tagged ‘Wellness’

Fall is a beautiful time of year to get out and enjoy all the sights, colors, and sounds of nature. All of this can be a treat for our senses. Connecting to your senses can be a simple way to reduce stress. Tapping into all five senses can immediately provide calming and healing powers.  Incorporate one of these sensory experiences into your day and enjoy finding something new about fall to love:

people walking in woods

Vision:

Have a scavenger hunt: look for items found in the woods or at a park, in your neighborhood, or stay in your own backyard.

Create some art: make a nature rubbing with paper and crayons. Collect interesting items such as bark or leaves and place them under the paper and rub them on top with a crayon.  Consider placing interesting leaves in a bowl or vase and enjoying for the season or arranging them in a frame.

Smell:

Pay attention to the new smells that come with the season. Bring your attention to the grass, flowers, and air of fall. Notice the difference between a sunny and rainy day and talk about these with your children or grandchildren noting the differences they perceive.

Taste:

Fall offers a variety of new taste experiences, including pumpkin, cinnamon, and more. Pay attention to how these seasonal flavors make you feel.

Touch:

Fall can provide new and exciting textures to explore. Grasses have different and new textures as the season changes. Acorns, leaves, bark, moss, pinecones, feathers, and more can all have interesting textures to explore.

Sound:

Crunching leaves, new bird sounds, and others can contribute to the exciting sounds of fall. Take some time to simply sit and observe the unique sounds of the season.

Try taking a sensory walk incorporating all these senses and enjoy the multi-sensory benefits of fall. Using all our senses to explore a new season can greatly enhance the experience of fall and provide fall memories that last!

Written by: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Miami County.

Reviewed by: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness, Ohio State University Extension.

Resources:

Globokar, L. (2020, November 27). Learn how reconnecting with your senses helps you to manage stress. Forbes. Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.forbes.com/sites/lidijaglobokar/2020/11/30/learn-how-reconnecting-with-your-senses-helps-you-to-manage-stress/?sh=32696bec1544

Whitney-Coulter, A. (2022, January 26). Use your five senses to connect with nature. Mindful. Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.mindful.org/sense-the-benefits-of-nature/

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Fall is here!  The mornings are cooler and there is a hint of color on the trees.  Fall is a perfect time to enjoy the beauty of the season.  Cool morning air, beautiful colors  and even some pumpkin spice.   It’s time to pause, reflect and recharge.  With the holiday season around the corner, it’s the season to slow down and assess your health and wellness.

Change is challenging, not only for the trees but for people too.   Ask a friend or colleague to join you in your journey to wellness.  Here are some tips for a healthier fall:

  • Boost your immunity– as colder weather arrives, it’s important to boost your immune system with foods containing Vitamin C (oranges, limes, grapefruit, peppers) to help fight off infections.  Almonds, garlic, ginger, and spinach also aids immunity health. Wash your hands often and drink lots of water.
  • Have dinner with your family.   It’s a perfect time to reconnect with your family.  Families that eat together tend to consume healthier meals and strengthen family relationships.
  • Visit a local farmers market.  Add in-season  fruits and vegetables into your meals.  Apples, turnips, brussels sprouts, and squash are great in-season options to add to your meals for nutrient dense benefits.
  • Watch those tailgate party calories.  Enjoy,  yet consider filling up on vegetables and modify foods to healthier options.
  • As cooler weather arrives, it’s a perfect time to get outdoors and enjoy the beauty of the season. Take a walk-in nature for increased physical activity.
  • Sterilize your most touched items.  Your cell phone, keyboard, remote, and tablet are exposed to bacteria.  Wipe down these surfaces frequently with a sanitizing wipe. 
  • Get enough vitamin D — This essential vitamin helps the body absorb calcium. We get most of our Vitamin D from the sun, so our intake decreases when the weather is colder since we spend most of our time inside during the fall/winter seasons. If you find you are not getting outside much, good sources of  Vitamin D include  salmon, tuna, and mushrooms.  Fortified foods that contain Vitamin D are cow’s milk, orange juice cereal and oatmeal. Vitamin D  can boost your mood and immune system!
  • Prepare your home for possible extreme weather conditions.  Is your snow shovel accessible?  Is your furnace and snow blower serviced and set to go.  Check the batteries in your flashlights and smoke detectors. 

With so many fun activities to do in the fall — apple picking, corn mazes, fall festivals, tail gating, football —  you’ll want to stay healthy to enjoy it all!

Have a happy and healthy fall!

Written by: Beth Stefura, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Shari Gallup, Assistant Professor, Ohio State University Extension, Licking County, gallup.1@osu.edu

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/infographic/healthy-fall.htm

https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/tips_for_staying_healthy_in_the_fall

https://www.webmd.com/women/features/8-fall-steps-for-healthy-living

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As the beginning of the school year quickly approaches, I’m reminded of my family’s rushed mornings out the door where I lack patience and feel frazzled. As those days progressed, I found it difficult to keep myself motivated and to stay focused on tasks on my ever-growing to-do list. At the end of many days, I felt exhausted with very little completed from my list.

Journaling

In preparation to not repeat the rushed and frazzled mornings this coming school year, I’ve started doing some research about how to make the most of my mornings. Research shows that a productive morning routine can have a positive impact on a person’s day. There are lots of different ideas when it comes to creating an energizing morning routine including getting up early, exercising, drinking water, eating a healthy breakfast, and journaling to name a few. I quickly found all the options overwhelming and wanted to find something that made creating a morning routine a little easier.

That’s when I came across a book called The Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod. Hal’s approach to a morning routine made it easier for me to implement. He suggests waking up earlier than you normally would and spending your time doing six personal development habits to transform your morning and your life. The six habits are an acronym SAVERS:

  1. Silence– As you sit in silence, you’re totally present in the now, in the moment. You calm your mind, relax your body, and allow all of your stress to melt away. You develop a deeper sense of peace, purpose, and direction.
  2. Affirmations– Reading over the reminders of how capable you really are, gives you a feeling of confidence. Looking over what you’re committed to, what your purpose is, and what your goals are re-energizes you to take the actions necessary to live the life you truly want, deserve, and now know is possible for you.
  3. Vision– Visualize the change you want to make in your life. Either by creating a vision board or closing your eyes and working through your visualization.
  4. Exercise– Stand up and spend some time getting your heart rate up. Getting energized, waking yourself up and increasing your ability to be alert and to focus.
  5. Reading– Grab a self-help book and read a couple of pages. Learn a new idea, something that you can implement into your day, or discover something new that you can use to be better.
  6. Scribing– Grab a piece of paper and take a minute to write down what you’re grateful for, what you’re proud, or the results you’re committed to creating for today. In doing so, you put yourself in an empowered, an inspired, and a confident state of mind
Quality Wins

The book gives you a base to apply the habits to make them work with your life and I love that I can customize these to fit with my goals. How would you feel if this is how you started your day? How would the quality of your day—your life—improve? I encourage you to wake up each day with more ENERGY, MOTIVATION, and FOCUS to take your day and your life to the next level. 

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

Sources:

Elrod, H. (2012). The Miracle Morning . Hal Elrod International, Inc.

Harvard Professional Development. (2016, September 21). 3 Ways to Boost Productivity with a Morning Ritual. Retrieved from https://professional.dce.harvard.edu/blog/3-ways-to-boost-productivity-with-a-morning-ritual/

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We all love the weekends- it is the time for fun! What did you do this past weekend that was fun? Did it bring a smile to your face? Are you counting the days until next weekend? We need daily fun in our lives. Fun provides many health benefits and makes life interesting. Having daily fun has a huge positive impact on our health and overall well-being. The benefits of laughter and fun include:

  • Reduced stress
  • Improved coping abilities
  • Boosted energy and work performance
  • Improved memory and concentration
  • Improved relationships
  • Improved sleep
  • Increased creativity

Here are ideas to add fun everyday into your life:

  • Get outdoors-take a walk, have a picnic with friends or family
  • Plan a fun night out- mini golf, karaoke, bowling, or dancing
  • Implement a weekly game night with family or friends
  • Visit a park
  • Enjoy an outdoor concert
  • Star gaze

Having fun is important. Start today to reduce stress, boost your energy level, improve productivity, and increase overall happiness by adding more fun into your daily schedule!

Written by:  Beth Stefura,  Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Margaret Jenkins, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Clermont County, jenkins.188@osu.edu

Sources:

Bekoff, M. (2014). The importance of play: having fun must be taken seriously. Psychology Today. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/animal-emotions/201405/the-importance-play-having-fun

Becker-Phelps, L. (2018). Why you need to have more fun. WebMD. https://blogs.webmd.com/relationships/20180620/why-you-need-to-have-more-fun

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Have you ever had a difficult time canceling an online account or subscription service? Maybe the ‘unsubscribe’ or ‘cancel’ button was hard to find, or you had to answer several questions first before being able to finally cancel?

Computer screen

These practices are known as “dark patterns” and they are becoming increasingly common on a variety of websites. Dark patterns are deceptive strategies used by businesses to manipulate the decisions made by their online customers. This may result in consumers spending more money than they had anticipated, signing up for services they do not want, or spending more time and attention on a website than they intended. Several groups are advocating for the removal of dark patterns since they can make navigating the internet more difficult for individuals who speak English as a second language as well as individuals who have less experience using online commerce. Unfortunately, dark patterns sit on the edge of legality, making it difficult for lawmakers to pass legislation against these practices.

Several different types of dark patterns have been identified since 2010, such as:

  • Friend Spam – A website will ask you for permission to access your contact list (usually under good pretenses) but will then send messages to your friends claiming to be from you.
  • Trick Questions – Questions that trick you into giving an answer you did not mean to give, or a question that is worded in a confusing way.
  • Disguised Ads – Advertisements that look like a part of the website content or navigation, in order to get you to accidentally click on them.
  • Confirm Shaming – Websites that make a user feel guilt or shame when selecting an option other than what the company desires.
  • Roach Motel – Websites that allow you to sign up for their services easily, but are then very difficult to unsubscribe from.

How can you avoid falling into these traps? The best way to avoid dark patterns is to slow down and read carefully before signing up for a subscription or purchasing a product. Federal and state governments are slowly addressing dark patterns as well – California recently added regulations to the “California Consumer Privacy Act” that prohibit companies from using some misleading means. 

Consumer Reports has also created the “Dark Patterns Tip Line,” where consumers can submit screen shots of dark patterns they have encountered on the web. Launched in 2021, the tip line now contains a multitude of real-life examples others have encountered.

What are some dark patterns you have experienced?

Sources:

Reicin, E. (2021). Understanding Dark Patterns: How to Stay Out of the Gray Areas. BBB National Programs. https://bbbprograms.org/media-center/blog-details/insights/2021/05/19/dark-patterns

Deceptive Design. Types of Deceptive Design.  https://www.deceptive.design/types

Dark Patterns Tip Line.  https://darkpatternstipline.org/

Germain, T. (2021). New Dark Patterns Tip Line Lets You Report Manipulative Online Practices. Consumer Reports. https://www.consumerreports.org/digital-rights/dark-patterns-tip-line-report-manipulative-practices-a1196931056/

Author: Jessica Lowe, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County, lowe.495@osu.edu

Reviewer:  Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

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Group of diverse volunteers

And I think to myself…. what a wonderful world.
~ Louis Armstrong

Being environmentally well means “recognizing the responsibility to preserve, protect, and improve the environment and appreciating your connection to nature.” In other words, environmental wellness happens when the different surroundings in your life enhance your health and wellbeing. This includes your home, your workplace, your local community, your natural surroundings, and the planet.

Three aspects of environmental wellness include: paying attention to the different environments that you spend time in, making an effort to spend time outdoors, and being more sustainable (AKA “going green”).

Health Benefits of Environmental Wellness Across the Lifespan

No matter what your age, research demonstrates the far-ranging health benefits of environmental wellness. For example:

  • Children who play outside in nature develop superior motor skills, balance, and coordination compared to children who play on traditional playgrounds.
  • Teens and young adults report feeling calmer, less stressed, and lower anxiety after spending time in nature.
  • Adults reduce their risk of chronic diseases including asthma, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke when they spend time in green space.
  • Senior adults who garden reduce their risk of dementia by 36%, even more than those who walk every day.

How can you start improving your environmental wellness? Commit to spending more time outdoors, being more green in your purchasing decisions, and actively caring for the environment. You can also try these simple activities:

  • Write nature into your schedule. Grab a bag and pick up litter while you are out.
  • Bike or walk rather than drive. If you drive, carpool when possible.
  • Use reusable water bottles, mugs, and shopping bags to limit waste.
  • Add houseplants to your home and work environments to improve indoor air quality and to psychologically link us to nature.
  • Learn about recycling in your community and recycle as much as possible.
  • Avoid purchasing single-use plastic and pack waste-free lunches.
  • Plan your food purchases to avoid food waste and compost food scraps.
  • Encourage local schools to recycle, compost, and host community gardens.
  • Decrease your use of energy and water.
  • Grow native plants to provide shelter and food for wildlife and support pollinators.
  • Donate your time or money to organizations that protect the environment.

Satish Kumar said, “We are nature.” Environmental wellness helps us recognize our connection to the natural world and realize that when we help our environment, we help ourselves. It is important, however, to point out that not everyone has equal access to nature or green environments, due to limited green space, accessibility limitations, safety concerns, and financial resources. We all need to work together not only to protect the natural world but to also ensure that everyone can reap the health benefits of environmental wellness equally.

For More Information:

  • On sustainability, visit the OSU Extension Sustainability website to find Trash-Free Trails, Reducing Your Single Use Plastic Waste, and many other tip sheets. In addition, there are many educational videos as well as a sustainable home tour: https://fcs.osu.edu/programs/resources/sustainability
  • On the importance of nature and spending time outdoors, visit the Nature Matters website created by OSU Extension, Warren County: go.osu.edu/nature-matters

Written by Laura Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Warren County, stanton.60@osu.edu.

Reviewed by Shannon Carter, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County, carter.413@osu.edu.

Photo Credit: Image by rawpixel.com

References:

Bickel, N. B. (2021, September 13). Youth report feeling physically, mentally better after spending time in nature. University of Michigan Health. https://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/wellness-prevention/youth-report-feeling-physically-mentally-better-after-spending-time-nature

Ingunn Fjørtoft. (2004). Landscape as playscape: The effects of natural environments on children’s play and motor development. Children, Youth and Environments, 14(2), 21–44. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.14.2.0021

Kumar, S. (2019). Elegant Simplicity: The Art of Living Well. New Society Publishers.

Melnyk, B. M., and Neale, S. (2018, January). Nine dimensions of wellness. American Nurse Today, 13 (1). https://www.myamericannurse.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/ant1-Wellness-1218.pdf

Simons, L. A., Simons, J., McCallum, J., & Friedlander, Y. (2006). Lifestyle factors and risk of dementia: Dubbo study of the elderly. The Medical Journal of Australia, 184(2), 68–70. https://doi.org/10.5694/j.1326-5377.2006.tb00120.x

Stanton, L. (2021) Ten tips for packing waste-free lunches. Ohio State University Extension. https://go.osu.edu/waste-free-lunches

Twohig-Bennett, C., & Jones, A. (2018). The health benefits of the great outdoors: A systematic review and meta-analysis of greenspace exposure and health outcomes. Environmental Research, 166, 628–637. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2018.06.030

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fresh strawberries and flowers

Join the “Spring Into Wellness” Email Challenge Now!

Challenge Dates: April 4 – May 15, 2022

Topics Covered:

  • Financial Wellness
  • Social Wellness
  • Intellectual Wellness
  • Creative Wellness
  • Environmental Wellness
  • Emotional Wellness
  • Physical Wellness
  • Occupational Wellness
  • Spiritual Wellness
  • Balance

What is the cost? It’s FREE!!

Who can participate? Any adult with an email account.

How do I sign up? Look at this chart and find your county. Go to the link beside your county and register before March 28, 2022.

County Registration Link
Belmont go.osu.edu/LHLWBelmont
Brown go.osu.edu/LHLWclermontbrown
Butler go.osu.edu/LHLWButler
Carroll go.osu.edu/LHLWCarroll
Champaign go.osu.edu/LHLWChampaign
Clark go.osu.edu/LHLWClark
Clermont go.osu.edu/LHLWclermontbrown
Coshocton go.osu.edu/LHLWCoshocton
Darke go.osu.edu/LHLWdarmerpreb
Defiance go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Fairfield go.osu.edu/LHLWFairfield
Franklin go.osu.edu/LHLWFranklin
Fulton go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Hancock go.osu.edu/LHLWHancock
Hardin go.osu.edu/LHLWHardin
Henry go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Hocking go.osu.edu/LHLWFairfield
Holmes go.osu.edu/LHLWHolmtusc
Knox go.osu.edu/LHLWKnox
Licking go.osu.edu/LHLWLicking
Lucas go.osu.edu/LHLWLucas
Mahoning go.osu.edu/LHLWMahoning
Medina go.osu.edu/LHLWMedina
Mercer go.osu.edu/LHLWdarmerpreb
Monroe go.osu.edu/LHLWMonroe
Morrow go.osu.edu/LHLWMorrow
Ottawa go.osu.edu/LHLWOttawaSandusky
Paulding go.osu.edu/LHLWpauputvw
Perry go.osu.edu/LHLWPerry
Pickaway go.osu.edu/LHLWPickaway
Pike go.osu.edu/LHLWPike
Preble go.osu.edu/LHLWdarmerpreb
Putnam go.osu.edu/LHLWPauputvw
Ross go.osu.edu/LHLWRoss
Sandusky go.osu.edu/LHLWOttawaSandusky
Trumbull go.osu.edu/LHLWTrumbull
Van Wert go.osu.edu/LHLWPauputvw
Warren go.osu.edu/LHLWWarren
Washington go.osu.edu/LHLWWashington
Williams go.osu.edu/LHLWnwohio
Wood go.osu.edu/LHLWWood

If your county isn’t listed, you may register with this link:

go.osu.edu/lhlwopen

For more information, contact Lisa Barlage, barlage.7@osu.edu or Roseanne Scammahorn scammahorn.5@osu.edu. 

Spring into Wellness with Extension!

Sponsored by Ohio State University Extension

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Let’s face it the last couple of years has been a whirlwind of events that have challenged us all!  The pandemic, racial tensions, natural disasters, and now the war in Ukraine. That isn’t even including the daily events in our lives that add stressors.  Talking to our kids about difficult subjects is one of the toughest things a parent has to do.  It’s hard to put the words together to address such big issues.

Communication helps us to process and to make sense of things we don’t understand. Offering guidance, a listening ear, and explaining current events brings comfort and allows children to understand and process subjects that are challenging (even if we don’t know all the answers).

Allow your child to lead the conversation. This helps you learn exactly what they are concerned about, so you can address it. Ask open-ended questions to gauge their understanding, make sure you are not distracted, and take your time. Making eye contact and repeating back what they say without judgment teaches them how to be good listeners and gives them the opportunity to correct any misunderstandings. Be sure to let them know you are there to talk to them when they are comfortable and ready. Lastly, be honest. If you don’t know the answer it is ok to say, “I don’t know, can I get back to you on that?”  Lying can cause damage and may result in the child getting information somewhere else.  It is best that they get information from a trusted adult.

Talking about difficult subjects with children’s guidelines:   

  • Be honest
  • Limit small kids’ exposure to age-appropriate subjects by turning off social media, tv, radio
  • Let them know you are a safe person to share with
  • Listen and ask questions
  • Acknowledge their feelings. Let them know you understand it is OK to have these feelings of uncertainty. 
  • Ask what they would do if they were in a difficult situation
  • Get them to consider solutions
  • Ask them if they ideas to help or change the situation and what they can do

Sources:

Walls, T. (2020.) How to Talk to Your Child About the News. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/news.html

Rocker, L. (2020). Breaking Bad News to Your Children.  https://www.childpsychologist.com.au/resources/breaking-bad-news-to-your-children-quirky-kids-6-top-tips

Children’s Museum Team, (2020). 7 Tips for Talking to Your Kids About Difficult Subjects. https://www.cmosc.org/talking-about-difficult-subjects/

Written by:  Kellie Lemly M.Ed., Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Champaign County, lemly.2@osu.edu

Reviewer: Roseanne Scammahorn, Ph.D. Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Darke County, scammahorn.5@osu.edu

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Three young people standing outside, one looking through binoculars and one pointing

Recently, I met an 11-year-old who likes birds. Since I self-identify as a bird nerd, we started talking and I quickly realized this young person had a genuine curiosity and passion for birds. She told me she had checked out Smithsonian Handbooks: Birds of North America from her school library and had no intention of returning it.

As a parent of teenagers, I struggle to get my kids off screens and out in nature, despite my constant reminders about the health benefits of getting outdoors. Here was a young person who wanted to get outside, so we made plans to go birding together.

And birding we did. The two of us spent 5 hours out in the cold on a gloomy, gray day and we had a blast. She brought (and I carried) the large, heavy Smithsonian library book with her. When we spotted a bird, she knew exactly where to find it in the book.

It was delightful to bird with a young person who was excited and engaged. I look forward to birding with her and other young people in the future. After spending time with a young birder, it became clear to me why we should take young birders under our wing:

  • They are connecting with nature: Our young people are disconnected from the natural world. Studies found that 8- to 12-years-old spend 4 to 6 hours on screens every day, while teens spend up to 9 hours. Time spent on screens almost always equates to time spent indoors, disconnected from nature.
  • They can showcase their strengths: Birdability is a non-profit organization that “ensures that birding truly is for everybody and every body, regardless of disability or other health concerns.” Their blog has stories from birders who are autistic, color-blind, hearing-impaired, and mobility-challenged. One young birder described her ADHD as her birding superpower since she saw and heard so many details around her!
  • They benefit from Vitamin N (Nature): There are decades of research that show the positive impact that spending time outdoors has on our mental and physical health. Nature has unique health benefits to young people, especially when it comes to kids with ADHD, allergies, asthma, weight issues, and mental health challenges.
  • They are becoming environmental stewards: Children who spend time in nature are more likely to feel connected to nature as adults, and therefore, more likely to care for and protect the natural world.

After our birding outing, I purchased my new birding buddy her own copy of the Smithsonian Handbook. I am selfishly hoping the returned library book will inspire another young birder at her school. I also added a Birds of Ohio Field Guide to her collection so the next time we’re out birding, neither of us has to lug a 752-page handbook.

Additional Birding Resources:
To find more information about birds and birding, please visit: go.osu.edu/nature-matters-birds

25th Annual Great Backyard Bird Count photo

Written by Laura M. Stanton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Warren County, stanton.60.osu.edu

Reviewed by Shari Gallup, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Licking County, gallup.1@osu.edu

Photo Credit: Kindel Media from Pexels

References:

Alsop, F. J. (2001). Smithsonian Handbooks: Birds of North America: Eastern Region. New York, NY: DK Publishing.

Wells, N. M. & Lekies, K. S. (2006). Nature and the Life Course: Pathways from Childhood Nature Experiences to Adult Environmentalism. Children, Youth and Environments, 16(1), 1–24. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.16.1.0001

Louv, R. (2008). Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.

Scripps Health. (2022, January 10). Do Your Kids Spend Too Much Time in Front of a Screen? https://www.scripps.org/news_items/4688-do-your-kids-spend-too-much-time-in-front-of-a-screen

Stanton, L. M. (2021, February 11). Benefits of Being a Bird Nerd. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/02/11/benefits-of-being-a-bird-nerd

Stanton, L. M. (2021, April 19). Get Out! Celebrate Nature on Earth Day and Every Day. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/04/19/get-out-celebrate-nature-on-earth-day-and-every-day

Stanton, L. M. (2021, November 30). Wonder and Wander in Nature this Winter. https://livehealthyosu.com/2021/11/30/wonder-and-wander-in-nature-this-winter

Tekiela, S. (2020). Birds of Ohio Field Guide. Cambridge, MN: Adventure Publications.

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This time of year, people are reflecting on the previous year and making resolutions. Most of the time, those new resolutions only last a few days or weeks, and they are forgotten by February. The start of a new year is the perfect time for a fresh start and an opportunity to change bad habits, that can help you grow emotionally, socially, physically, or psychologically. 

Take your time planning and choosing your resolution. Creating a detailed plan will assist you in sticking to your goal. Write down the strategies you will implement, the steps you will take, and why you want to do it. This will help keep you on track. 

Remember to be realistic when making your resolution and make one change at a time.  Don’t set yourself up for failure by trying to change everything at once. Take control of one habit and then move to another. For example:  If your resolution is to change an eating habit, take one small simple step at a time. Step one: Drink more water. Step two: Start the day by eating a healthy breakfast. Step three: Add more activity each week. Focusing on one small change instead of big changes will help you accomplish your goal. 

Reward yourself. Set little rewards for meeting your goals or steps along the way to help you stay motivated. Make the reward something that will encourage you to stay on track and motivated to keep moving toward your goal.

Sometimes, changes involve setbacks. Don’t give up on your goal. If you mess up and stray from your plan, think about the reasons you want to change. Get back on track and make it happen. 

Sources:

Clear, J. (2021) How To Start New Habits that Actually Stick.  https://jamesclear.com/three-steps-habit-change

Kliff, S. (2014).  The Science of Actually Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution.  https://www.vox.com/2014/12/29/7434433/new-years-resolutions-psychology

The Ohio State Univeristy. (2021, June 28). Creating Healthy Habits that Last. Retrieved on December 15, 2021, https://recsports.osu.edu/articles/creating-healthy-habits-that-last/

Written by:  Kellie Lemly M.Ed., Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Champaign County, lemly.2@osu.edu

Reviewer: Roseanne Scammahorn, Ph.D. Family Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Darke County, scammahron.5@osu.edu

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