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Need more energy? Have this energy drink. If you are playing a sport, you need a sports drink. Really, do we need sport or energy drinks, vitamin waters, or fruit flavored drinks? The advertisers claim we need them. What is truth and what is hype? sports beverages

• Sports drinks are not necessary unless you are engaging in continuous, vigorous activity for more than 60 minutes in hot weather. Most sports drinks have lots of sugar and calories. Most of us don’t need the extra nutrients, electrolytes and/or protein as your diet usually provides what is needed. Water is the best drink for rehydrating, which is what your body needs. Sports drinks increase the risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, dental caries and cardiovascular disease. Low-fat or fat-free milk can be a better option to drink when engaging in sports or physical activity to regain what you have lost.

• Energy drinks are not needed and may over-stimulate the cardiovascular and nervous system causing some detrimental effects. Most energy drinks have high amounts of caffeine and other stimulates. Energy drinks can be dangerous for people with unknown heart issues. Energy drinks are not safe for youth. In fact, studies have shown youth who drink energy drinks are less able to concentrate and may have a slower reaction speed. Extra vitamins in energy drinks do not really help your body. Energy drinks have been associated with many health concerns such as increased blood pressure, sleep problems, seizure activity, heart arrhythmia and others. Avoid powdered caffeine which is very dangerous.

• Vitamin waters have added vitamins which are better obtained by eating vegetables and fruits. These drinks also contain added sugar and sodium. Don’t pay the high price tag for these which also increase the risk of obesity. Eat a healthy diet and drink water.

• Fruit flavored drinks tend to be high in added sugar and other ingredients. Some of the herbal fruit flavored drink ingredients have not been researched on children. These drinks also increase the risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome, dental caries and cardiovascular disease.glass of iced tea

• Sweetened teas and coffee drinks have added sugar and carry the same health risks as sports drinks. They also can cause sleep disturbances and nervous problems in youth and adults.

Beverage manufactures are trying to convince us that they are providing us with “ready-to-go” attractive beverages. Most of the health claims on the bottles cannot be proven true and the added sugars increase the risk of diabetes and obesity.

Drink water!
It is the best drink. Other recommended choices include nonfat or low-fat milk and 100% fruit or vegetable juice in small amounts. Eat a healthy diet, and you will have the vitamins and minerals you need to stay healthy.

Writer: Pat Brinkman, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension
Reviewer: Susan Zies, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension

References:
Center for Weight and Health, (2014). Hiding Under a Health Halo, University of California at Berkeley, Available at: http://www.publichealthadvocacy.org/healthhalo.html
Nelson, J. and Zeratsky, K. (2010). Milk Joins the Roster of Sports Drinks, Mayo Clinic, Available at http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-blog/sports-drinks/bgp-20056125
Nutrition Action, (2014). Caffeine in Food – Caffeine Content of Drinks Revealed! Available at http://nutritionaction.com/daily/caffeine-in-food

#SuperfoodsChat

super foods

From Brussels sprouts and blueberries to salmon and sweet potatoes, there is a lot to learn about super foods! OSU Extension professionals will be sharing information on what makes some foods “super” and how to work super foods into your diet.

date

Follow and chat with the Live Healthy Live Well team…

Lisa Barlage – Family & Consumer Sciences Educator @lbarlage

Linnette Goard – Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection and Management @lmgoard

Polly Loy – Family & Consumer Sciences Educator @WellnessWakeup

Dan Remley – Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition and Wellness @remley4

hashtag super

 

genericFood Riddle: When is a generic food not a generic?
Answer: When it tastes as good as the real thing!

Generic food brands, introduced in 1977, have changed dramatically over the last 37 years. Initially sold in plain white packaging with black lettering, they were considered inferior to name brand products. The “generics” were even ostracized to their own aisle; a grocery store version of food segregation, if you will. But much like the ad campaign slogan that touted “you’ve come a long way, baby,” generic food has made leaps and bounds in quality, price, and reputation.

Generic food is produced and manufactured primarily through two venues; at name brand factories on the same production line as their more expensive counterparts, or by less well-known companies. Instead of the plain package designation of the past, most generics are now sold by supermarkets as their “store” brand. What’s even more amazing is that some of the national chains such as Kroger and Walmart actually sell high and low version of their own generics. For example, Kroger has a top quality line (Private Selection), as well as a budget line (Kroger Value).

Because of their inauspicious start, some people still perceive generic food products as lacking in taste and/or quality. But a trading standards investigation found little nutritional or taste difference between generic and name brand products. And in an October 2010 Consumer Reports food comparison, researchers recommended consumers at least try store brand products. Their rationale? There is little risk because most grocery stores offer a money-back guarantee if you are not satisfied with the generic product. The 2010 Consumer Reports challenge compared 21 name brand vs. store brand products, and results may surprise you. Name brands won seven taste tests, store brands won three, and the other 11 products tied!

Name brand companies spend billions of dollars in advertising to entice you to purchase their products. That cost is ultimately passed on to you, the consumer. Generics don’t have the same mandate to market their products; they can essentially “piggy-back” off the marketing of the name brands. That is why the store brand or generic brand will usually cost less (an exception sometimes exists when the name brand product is on sale).

Generic food products offered to consumers have certain characteristics in common. The price differential runs 10%-35% below national brands, and 10%-20% below private brand. Most retailers have introduced generics in order to attract price conscious shoppers. However, other food retailers have added them to their stock as a defense mechanism to keep from losing patrons to low overhead “box stores” (e.g. Sam’s Club) or to merchants who specialize in generic products (e.g. Aldi’s).

The Bottom Line??

Food is traditionally considered the third largest line item in the family budget, after housing and transportation. However, I have found for many families it is their #1 expense, even more than their house or car payment. We tend not to be aware of how much we spend on food, because it is not a once-a-month bill. If you would like to free up more dollars in your family budget, consider choosing generic food products. You may find that you like them as well, if not more so, than name brand products.

Written by: Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Betsy DeMatteo, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, dematteo.15@osu.edu

Sources:http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine-archive/2010/october/shopping/store-brands-vs-name-brands/overview/index.htm

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/fcd/nutrition/ewfl/module3/shopping2.html

http://www.acrwebsite.org/search/view-conference-proceedings.aspx?Id=9804

Berries and Fiber

Breakfast Cereal 3Berries have a high level of antioxidants. Antioxidants are molecules found in food which may help prevent cancer and other chronic diseases. Many people are aware of this and consume more berries because of this. But, did you know that berries are also high in fiber?

Check out the fiber values in berries:

Food Portion/Amount of Fiber
Raspberries, raw 1 cup 8 g
Blueberries, raw 1 cup 4 g
Currants (red and white), raw 1 cup 5 g
Strawberries, raw 1 cup 3 g
Boysenberries, frozen 1 cup 7 g
Gooseberries, raw 1 cup 6 g
Loganberries, frozen 1 cup 8 g
Elderberries, raw 1 cup 10 g
Blackberries, raw 1 cup 8 g

Preserve berries so you will have them to eat all year long. They can be canned, frozen or dried. Use them on your breakfast cereal, yogurt or in salads.

Try this recipe:

berries farm to health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to recipe card: http://localfoods.osu.edu/sites/d6-localfoods.web/files/Berries_0.pdf

Sources:
Palmer, Sharon (2008). The top fiber-rich foods list, Today’s Dietician, vol 10, no 7, p 28.  http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/063008p28.shtml

The Ohio State University, Maximize your nutrients from : Berries, Farm to Health Series, localfoods.osu.edu/maximizenutrients

Written by: Linnette Goard, Field Specialist, Food Safety, Selection and Management, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, goard.1@osu.edu

Reviewed by:: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Pickaway County, Heart of Ohio EERA, Ohio State University Extension, treber.1@osu.edu

Safe Sleep for Baby!

 

When I was a young mother, the message that we received about keeping our babies safe as they slept was to have them sleep on their stomach. We also used crib bumper pads, small pillows, stuffed animals, and of course soft, fluffy blankets.

All of these recommendations have changed in the last few years. The message on safe sleep for a baby is as simple as ABC.baby in crib

A – ALONE! You should never share a bed with a baby nor take a nap on the couch or chair with the baby because you could roll too close or onto your baby, babies can get stuck between the mattress and the wall, headboard, footboard or other furniture or fall off of the bed. The safest place for your baby to sleep is in your room (within arm’s reach), but not in your bed.

B – BACK! Babies who sleep on their backs are less likely to choke than those who sleep on their stomachs. Always put your baby to sleep on his or her back. It’s safer for your baby to wake up during the night on his back. If he or she is sleeping on their tummy and needs to take a deep breath they might not be able to move their head and the baby’s mouth or nose could be blocked and they could suffocate.

C – CRIB! Place your baby to sleep in a safety-approved crib with a firm mattress covered by a fitted sheet. Sleep clothing like fitted, appropriate-sized sleepers and sleep sacks are safer for a baby than blankets. Many parents think their baby won’t be safe and warm without bumper pads, blankets, pillows and stuffed animals, but these items can be deadly. Babies can suffocate on any extra item in the crib.

Some other general guidelines for a happy healthy baby:

  • Don’t smoke or allow others to smoke around your baby.
  • Try using a pacifier at nap and bed time.
  • Give your baby some “tummy time” when he is awake and someone is watching. This helps avoid flat spots on baby’s head and helps develop neck muscles.
  • Infants should receive all recommended immunizations.

While much of this information is shared with new mothers and fathers, often a grandma or baby sitter hasn’t heard the new safety recommendations. Be sure and share these guidelines with anyone caring for your baby.

 

Written by: Marilyn Rabe, Family and Consumer Science Educator, OSU Extension, Franklin County, rabe.9@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Susan Zies, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, OSU Extension, Wood County,  zies.1@osu.edu

 

Sources:

http://www.odh.ohio.gov/~/media/ODH/ASSETS/Files/infant%20safe%20sleep/SafeSleep_Brochure-TriFold-Print_5-6-14.ashx

http://columbus.gov/publichealth/programs/Safe-Sleep-for-Infants/Infant-Safe-Sleep/

http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sts/Pages/default.aspx

 

 

Is it your money? Your relationships? Your time management? Post your pictures of your smart healthy lifestyle with #livesmartohio and win big! Winners will be featured on the Live Smart Ohio website and social media channels, and 1 Grand Prize winner of a pair of OSU football tickets will be chosen! Submit your entries by September 30th, 2014

LSO FINAL Campaign flyer

Live Smart Ohio is the name of a new campaign for OSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences launching this fall. We serve thousands of people throughout Ohio every year, delivering the highest quality research-based educational programs focused on building healthy people, healthy finances and healthy relationships. Our information can be used to make smart decisions to improve the quality of lives. We make lives better … and communities stronger.

mother and daughter cooking

We help people stay healthy through good nutrition and food safety. We teach people to use their money wisely, and we offer them the skills to create a positive work-life balance.

Family and Consumer Sciences empowers Ohioans to improve their finances, build more positive relationships and embrace healthier lifestyles.

  • We teach children, adults, families and communities the skills needed to live healthfully in all areas of life.
  • We promote healthy lifestyles: healthy bodies, healthy finances, and healthy relationships.
  • We are a source of information you can trust.
  • We are a catalyst that brings positive change to communities.

Find your local Extension office at http://extension.osu.edu/locate-an-office

email: fcs@osu.edu

fcs.osu.edu

http://fcs.osu.edu/blog/2014/08/29/how-do-you-livesmartohio-post-your-photos-and-win-osu-football-tickets/

 

Fall is for Apples!

Next to football, my favorite thing about fall is apples!  I have my personal favorite variety; what’s yours? Here are a few facts about apples:

  • Nutrition – We all know, “An apple a day, keeps the doctor away.”, but do you know why? Apples are delicious, easy to carry for snacking, low in calories (about 80), and they are still very inexpensive. Apples have 4 grams of fiber, including both soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber actually helps to prevent cholesterol buildup in the lining of blood vessel walls, thus reducing the incident of atherosclerosis and heart disease. The insoluble fiber in apples provides bulk in the intestinal tract, holding water to cleanse and move food quickly through the digestive system.  It is best to eat apples with their skin. Almost half of the vitamin C content is just underneath the skin and eating the skin also increases insoluble fiber content.  For complete apple nutrition facts, check out this site: http://urbanext.illinois.edu/apples/nutrition.cfm
  • Varieties – Did you know there are more than 7,500 varieties of apples worldwide? How do you ever decide which one becomes a favorite or which one is best for a particular purpose? Apple varieties have different qualities. Apples can be sweet, tart, soft and smooth or crisp and crunchy, depending on the one you choose. Some are perfect for baking, others work better for salads, and some are ideal for eating fresh off the tree. For example, Jonathans are tart, great for baking or eating. Honeycrisps are sweet, crisp, and delicious for eating. Galas are sweet, good for, eating, or salads.  Granny Smith apples are tart and great for baking.  Here is a  wonderful guide to help you know which varieties are best for what you plan to do: http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1402.html
  • The Best Place to Buy Apples – If you have the chance, there are benefits to buying your apples locally.
    • Locally grown food is full of flavor.
    • Eating local food is eating seasonally.
    • Local food has more nutrients.
    • Local food supports the local economy.
    • Local food benefits the environment.
    • Local foods promote a safer food supply.
    • Local growers can tell you how the food was grown.

When you know where your food comes from and who grew it, you know a lot more about that food. To find a Farmer’s Market in your area that sells apples, the Ohio Proud website will allow you to enter your county and find a place to buy apples close by. See: http://ohioproud.org/searchmarkets.php

  • A Recipe – Fall is a good time to enjoy this recipe for Apple Salad:

3 med apples (unpeeled), cut in chunks

1/2 cup crushed pineapple, drained

1/4 cup celery, diced

2 T raisins

3 T plain yogurt

2 t mayonnaise

1 T pineapple juice

1/8 t cinnamon

Combine apples, pineapple, celery, and raisins. Mix yogurt, mayonnaise, pineapple juice and cinnamon together and blend into other ingredients. Yield: Four 1 cup servings. Calories: 121 per serving.

Written by: Kathryn K Dodrill, MA, CFCS, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Washington County

Reviewed by: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ross County

Sources:

Apple Nutrition, http://urbanext.illinois.edu/apples/nutrition.cfm

Apple Varieties, http://www.bestapples.com/varieties/index.aspx

Suggested Uses for Ohio Apples, http://www.ohioapples.com/ohio_apples_uses.htm

Apples: A Guide to Selection and Use, http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1402.html

5 A Day Roadside Market Project, http://ohioline.osu.edu/5-a-day/apples.html

Find a Farmer’s Market, http://ohioproud.org/searchmarkets.php

7 Benefits of Eating Local Foods, http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/7_benefits_of_eating_local_foods

 

 

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