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The hot days of summer are ahead and the kids are enthusiastically playing, jumping and running around the yard.  You want to have them be active, but are they drinkinchildren-433165__340g enough fluid?

Children, especially infants and preschoolers, become dehydrated faster than adults.   They often get busy playing and don’t recognize the signs of dehydration.  Signs of dehydration include:

  • Dry or sticky mouth
  • Dry, cool skin
  • Lethargy or irritability
  • Fatigue or dizziness
  • Lack of urine or only a small amount that is very dark yellow in color
  • Few or no tears when crying
  • Sunken eyes

Many times thirst is not the first sign or an early sign of dehydration. A child may be dehydrated before they feel thirsty.   If a child drinks when thirsty it may not completely replace all the necessary body fluids.   Thus, it’s important to drink before thirst develops and continue to drink.

What to drink?

Water is the best choice for re-hydration.  Sports drinks are usually not needed unless the child has participated in prolonged (more than an hour) vigorous physical activity.  Examples of vigorous physical activity are long-distance running or biking, soccer, basketball, or hockey.  Water is the best option for re-hydrating, and it has no calories.  Milk can also be a good option for re-hydration.  Children should not be given energy drinks or drinks with caffeine.

How much bottles-774466__340do they need to drink?

There is no magic number but children should drink before the activity and then at regular intervals (every 20-30 minutes) during the activity and after it is over.   The higher the temperature outside the more they need to drink.  Eating foods with high water content can help hydrate too.  These include soup, strawberries, watermelon, lettuce, cabbage, celery, spinach and broccoli.

Make Water fun to Drink

  1. Purchase some ice cube trays in fun shapes and use them.
  2. Freeze fruit pieces and then add to the water to drink. You can cut them in interesting shapes before freezing. water-2232732__340
  3. Add fruit to the water, such as lemon, limes, oranges, strawberries, watermelon, etc.
  4. Purchase an infuser bottle and add the fruit or cucumbers to provide more taste. Be sure to wash the bottle each day after use.
  5. Let the child pick out a new water bottle or special cup.
  6. Freeze some freezer-safe water bottles to use when needed.
  7. Keep a pitcher of water in the refrigerator so you can pour them a cool drink, or have small bottles of water in the refrigerator they can easily grab.
  8. Try some sparkling waters without added sugar or sugar substitutes if you want the carbonation. Read labels carefully.

Be A Good Example Yourself! Drink Water!

Author:  Pat Brinkman, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Fayette County

Reviewer: Amanda Bohlen, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Washington County

References:

Barron, S. A. (2016).  Dehydration.  Kids Health from Nemours.  Available at http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/dehydration.html#

Martin, L. J. (2017). Dehydration.  Medline Plus, U. S. National Library of Medicine.  Available at https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000982.htm

Mayo Clinic Staff, (2017).  Dehydration Symptoms and Causes.  Mayo Clinic.  Available at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/symptoms-causes/dxc-2026

It can be stressful for a parent to get a tearful phone call from a child at camp. For children who are away from home, it is very common for them to experience homesickness. Ninety percent of all children report experiencing feelings of sadness when separated from their home environment. Most children are able to function at camp and learn to work through homesickness. And it’s worth the struggle when kids return stronger and more independent. Some preparation ahead of time may help lessen homesickness at camp.

camp

Have your child help pack. If your child is picking out his clothes and making sure they he has all that he needs, this will help him start to think about time at camp and taking care of himself.

Be positive when you talk with your child about camp. Remind him how much fun he will have with new activities and making new friends.

Address any concerns your child may have about being away from home. You can create some coping strategies together, or better yet, have him come up with suggestions of what he might do in certain situations. For example, when he feels homesick, or lonely he could write a letter home, find a friend, talk with camp staff, or get busy with an activity.

Back up Plans. Do NOT make a back up plan with your child in case he wants to come home. If a child and a parent have an easy ‘out’ it will likely be taken. Camp staff are usually prepared to help a homesick child. You might, however, talk with camp staff to make sure your child is working through it and still having a positive camp experience. You can encourage your child to stick it out. If the homesickness is severe and your child is not functioning well, decide ahead of time what you will do.

Pack notes in your child’s bag with encouraging words, affirmations, and even some funny jokes or camp mad libs for him to complete.  If you mail letters to camp, be positive and encourage your child that he can do it! Telling your child how much you miss him may not be helpful. Consider sending stamped envelopes and paper so your child can write you back. It will help him feel connected with you, and it’s neat to read the notes even after camp.

Prepare yourself to be apart from your child for the week. Have a friend you can talk with and that can give you positive and encouraging reminders. Click here for more tips for parents to manage their own worries about summer camp.

Written by: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Fairfield County

Reviewed by: Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County

Sources:

American Psychological Association. “Summer camp blues: Planning ahead to lessen homesickness at camp.” 2017. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/camp.aspx

American Psychological Association. “Sending your child to camp: Manage your own worries.” 2017. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/camp-worry.aspx

 

 

 

tired-hikers-249683_1280During the summer months, it can be difficult to stay calm, cool, and collected as the temperature and humidity rise. It is important to be aware of the ways to keep ourselves safe in the heat. By following safety tips and being proactive, we can avoid serious illness such as heat exhaustion, heat stroke, and hyperthermia.

  • Plan ahead. Whether you are swimming, having a cook-out, going the zoo or amusement park, canoeing, hiking, camping, going to the beach, or simply lying in a hammock in your backyard, it is important to be prepared as you are planning for the sun-filled days of summer.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water. Not a water fan?  Add some fruit (fresh or frozen) to your bottle and enjoy the refreshing taste.  Did you know that at most public places (including restaurants, zoos, and theme parks) where fountain beverages are sold, you can usually get a free cup of water?
  • Avoid alcoholic and carbonated beveragesAlcoholic and carbonated beverages will actually dehydrate you, rather than hydrate you.
  • Pack a cooler.  By bringing healthier foods with you and taking time to sit and eat or snack, you are more likely to stop, rest, and refuel your body. Fruits and vegetables are naturally high in water content and will help you stay hydrated. A bonus is that you will help stay within your budget by not purchasing higher priced foods and beverages.
  • Choose your clothing wisely. Loose fitting clothes that are lighter in color will help to keep you cool.
  • Exercise early in the morning or later in the evening. Avoid strenuous activities during the midday hours (10 a.m.- 4 p.m.) when the sun’s rays are the strongest.
  • Stay Sun Safe.  Wear a wide-brimmed hat. Wear sun screen that is at least SPF 15.  Choose sunglasses that block 100% of UVA and UVB rays.
  • Seek shade.  Taking time to find the shady spot or by sitting under a sport or pop-up tent can help to lower your body temperature.

Move to a cool location, sit or lie down, apply cold wet cloths to your body, and sip water if you notice any of the following signs of heat exhaustion:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Weakness,
  • Cold, pale, and clammy skin
  • Changes in pulse
  • Nausea or vomiting (please contact a health professional if vomiting does not stop)
  • Fainting

Enjoy your summer.  Stay cool and safe!

Written by: Jami Dellifield, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Hardin County.

Reviewed by: Lisa Barlage, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ross County.

Sources:

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services https://www.cdc.gov/extremeheat/warning.html

Summer Stress, Safe Tactics for Ag Today, July 2015 Andy Bauer, Ohio AgrAbility Educational Program Coordinator, https://agsafety.osu.edu/newsletter/ag-safety-stat/july-2015/injury-prevention/summer-stress

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services https://www.cdc.gov/media/subtopic/matte/pdf/CDCSummerSafety.pdf

National Institutes of Health, https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/hyperthermia.

Healthy Beverage Guidelines, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-drinks-full-story/

Photo Credits: https://pixabay.com/en/tired-hikers-resting-place-rest-249683/

 

June is moving right along which means the summer growing season is upon us. June is also National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month.  It is a great time to focus on eating more fresh fruits and vegetables. June is a good time to remind ourselves to make half of our plate fruits and vegetaveggiebles since most Americans don’t eat enough of either.

Locate a farmer’s market in your area and make it a point to visit to see what locally grown produce vendors have to offer.

Fruits and vegetables are packed with the nutrients our bodies need for healthy growth and development. They provide many important vitamins and minerals as well as dietary fiber. Since most fruits and veggies have a high water content, they help keep us hydrated. Snack on some watermelon on a hot day to help cool you off and to hydrate you!

By eating a healthy diet with lots of fruits and vegetables, you can help reduce the risk of heart disease, including heart attack and stroke and protect against certain types of cancers.

Vegetables are divided into subgroups based on the different combinations of nutrients they provide. It is important to eat a variety of vegetables and to eat from all of the subgroups throughout the week.  The table below breaks vegetables into subgroups to assist you with choosing a variety to eat.

veggie subgroup chart

 

As I mentioned earlier, very few Americans eat enough fruits and vegetables as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines. Below are some suggestions to help you make half your plate fruits and vegetables.

  • Serve salads or a vegetable as a side dish at dinner.
  • Choose a fruit instead of dessert.
  • Create or order mixed dishes like casseroles or stir-fry.
  • Snack on fresh fruits or vegetables, like grapes, bananas, carrots, or cucumbers.
  • East a piece of fruit with breakfast every day.
  • Build your meals around fruits and vegetables when meal planning.
  • Cool off this summer with a fruity homemade smoothie or popsicle. You can even get adventurous and add some veggies to your recipes.

fruits

 

Did you know……fruits and vegetables consumed in almost all forms count towards your daily total?  These can be canned, dried, frozen, or fresh.  Canned and frozen foods are processed within hours of being harvested so their nutritional value and flavor are preserved.

 

Author:  Tammy Jones, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Pike County

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Perry County

Sources:

Brooks, A. (2014).  All About Smoothies.  Virginia Cooperative Extension.  http://blogs.ext.vt.edu/eatsmart-movemore/2014/04/03/all-about-smoothies/

Fruits & Veggies More Matters.  http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/fresh-frozen-canned-dried-and-100-juice

Fruits & Veggies More Matters.  http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/key-nutrients-in-fruits-and-vegetables

Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.  https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/

Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/chapter-2/a-closer-look-at-current-intakes-and-recommended-shifts/#table-2-1

United States Department of Agriculture.  https://www.choosemyplate.gov/vegetables-nutrients-health

United States Department of Agriculture.  https://healthymeals.fns.usda.gov/features-month/june/national-fresh-fruit-and-vegetable-month

 

 

OSU Extension 4H clubs Highland Youth Garden Groveport ButtoneersDo you enjoy gardening? Growing your own healthy fruits and vegetables?  Looking at the beautiful flowers that you have grown? I’m sure many answered yes to these questions, but if I ask, “Do you enjoy weeding your garden?” I would probably receive a different answer!

June 13th is actually National Weed Your Garden Day!  Who would have imagined that there is a day dedicated to such an unpopular pastime!  However, the background for this day provides several good reasons that we should devote a day (or more!) to weeding our gardens.

First, weeding can lead to healthier crops.  The weeds compete with your desirable plants for water, sunlight and nutrients. This is especially important when the plants are young. If you can have your soil weed free before planting you are off to a good start.

One of the best tips for having a weed free garden is to stay in control.  Weeding for 5 – 10 minutes each day can help you keep ahead of the fast growing weeds. Be careful not to let any weeds produce seed. You can mulch between the plants to help prevent weeds from sprouting.

Weeding can also help lead to a healthier you.  Did you know that you can burn calories and work some of your muscles simply by weeding your garden? If you’d like to improve your shoulders, arms, thighs, and butt muscles, gardening could be for you!

Here is a simple calculator to help you determine how many calories you can burn while weeding. As an example, an average slice of cheese pizza contains 272 calories.  If you weigh about 150 lbs. and weed in the garden for about 45 minutes, you could balance out that slice of pizza!  You can also increase the intensity of your weeding session to have a cardiovascular workout.

So if you want healthier fresh fruits and vegetables from your own garden and the bonus of a more fit body, take the time to regularly weed your garden.

Written by:  Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Franklin County. Rabe.9@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Candace J. Heer, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Morrow County, heer.7@osu.edu

 

Sources:

https://www.nationaldaycalendar.com/days-2/national-weed-your-garden-day-june-13/

https://www.fitwatch.com/caloriesburned/calculate?descr=weeding%252520garden&mets=4.5

https://hortnews.extension.iastate.edu/1993/11-10-1993/exer.html

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If there was a support group for tuna addicts, I would be sitting in the front row. I have been a tuna fish lover since I was in elementary school. My mother always packed my lunch, and when I opened that brown paper bag and saw a tuna fish sandwich wrapped in waxed paper, I was euphoric. Now that I am an adult, my opportunities to eat tuna have increased exponentially.

In addition to tuna sandwiches, I also love tuna noodle casserole, tuna burgers, grilled tuna and cheese, and tuna pasta salad. Unfortunately, growing up, my kids hated tuna fish, so I didn’t make those dishes very often when they were still at home. Now that they are gone, I can indulge myself to my heart’s content.

A couple of years ago, my granddaughter spent the day with me and watched me eat a tuna fish sandwich. Since her father (my son) probably never brought a can of tuna into their house, she didn’t know what it was and asked for a taste of my sandwich.  I gave her a bite, and she said “this is really good.”  Hallelujah, I got another tuna lover (it just had to skip a generation). So now my son buys tuna and makes it for her at home, which pleases me no end.  Because the health benefits of tuna are amazing.

Research over the years has clearly shown anti-inflammatory benefits from omega-3 fatty acids, and tuna is an important source of omega-3’s. In an average 5-ounce can, you can get anywhere from 7-28 milligrams of EPA and 140-850 milligrams of DHA. Both types of fatty acids are necessary for regulation of the body’s inflammatory system and prevention of inflammation. The higher numbers are more reflective of the omegas in albacore tuna; the lower from canned “light” tuna. But albacore tuna may contain more mercury, so I stick with the light version since I eat it 2-3 times a week.

Omega-3 fatty acids can reduce your risk for heart disease, cancer and arthritis. They can also help lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Because they support a healthy brain, omega-3’s may aid in the treatment of certain mental disorders such as depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Tuna contains small amounts of the antioxidants vitamin C, manganese, and zinc. But where it really shines is in its selenium content. Selenium also acts as an antioxidant, as well as boosting the immune system, regulating thyroid function, and improving blood flow.

As well, tuna is high in niacin, a B-vitamin that helps keep your digestive system, skin and nerves healthy. Niacin helps reduce harmful cholesterol levels and may increase beneficial cholesterol as well.

Do you have a cat?

Cats love tuna water. Don’t throw it down the drain. Press the lid down, squeeze the water into a bowl, and give it to your cat. You end up with a sandwich for yourself and a bowl of fishy goodness for your favorite feline. Win, win.

cat-33595_960_720

YUM!

 

Written by:  Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

 

Reviewed by:  Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

 

Sources:

http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/omega3-fatty-acids

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002409.htm

 

Most schools have either finished up in the last week, or will be wrapping up in the next week or so. Initially everyone in the family is excited and there are lots of ideas of what to do – but it doesn’t take long and we hear those famous words “I’m bored! I can’t find anything to do!” As adults it isn’t our job to plan their days to the extent that schools do, with a new activity every 45 minutes, but we do need to keep them engaged so they don’t watch TV or play video games all day – everyday. Some parenting experts even suggest that a little boredom  isn’t a bad thing for children; it is a way for them to learn how to fill their own time and learn what makes them happy. Several of these experts suggest developing a family list of things to do whenever you say “I’m bored”. When children say “I’m bored” they need to pick something off the list to do. Depending on the age of the child this might include:

  • Playing cards or other games
  • Puzzles
  • Coloring or other crafts like playdough
  • Reading
  • Bubbles
  • Science experiments like making your own slime (Click here for recipes from Penn State).
  • Hula hoops
  • Playing dress up – chef, teacher, police officer, farmer, etc
  • Building sets or blocks
  • Music or dancing
  • Cooking
  • Gardening
  • Riding bikes
  • Sandbox time
  • Writing their own play to act out a book they read
  • Playing or caring for the family pet

If parents or grandparents work with children to do a little research, you can typically find a variety of activities that are offered in your area (with many at low or no cost) to include one or two days a week as well. You may want to select a day of the week that you will do one of these “away” activities, or develop a calendar that they can see to know which day you will do something next. Look for these activities from:

  • City parks or recreation – pools, craft sessions, fishing, free lunches, or lessons.
  • Museums or State/National Parks – Junior park ranger programs, historical reenactments, volunteer opportunities.
  • Free movie programs – at local cinemas, libraries, or parks.
  • YMCA or Boys/Girls Clubs – Day Camps, events or lessons (like swim, basketball, soccer, gymnastics, etc).
  • Summer Reading Programs and Events at Libraries – typically include reading programs for all ages, volunteer opportunities for teens, carnivals, crafts, and author events.
  • School or University Programs – many offer a week of special camps, often at a very low cost. In my area they include technology camp, art programs, Chinese camp, space camp, and summer sports camps.
  • Bowling – The Kids Bowl Free Program is offered at hundreds of bowling lanes around the country. This program allows children to bowl 2 free games per day and adults of families who participate can pay a reduced price as well. My family took advantage of this program for several years.
  • Extension or 4-H Programs – Check with your local university Extension or 4-H Office for summer camps or programs that are available. Some may require a membership, but others are open enrollment. Possibilities are Space Camps, STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math Programs, Cooking Camp, Babysitter Trainings, or traditional 4-H Camp.

Try these ideas for the “I’m bored!” crew and don’t forget it is OK for them to be a little bored. Children should use that time to develop their own hobbies and interests. Remember to limit TV and internet time to no more than 1 to 2 hours per day. Excessive TV viewing can contribute to sleep problems, obesity, behavior problems, and risky behavior.

Sources:

Penn State Extension, http://extension.psu.edu/youth/betterkidcare/early-care/our-resources/tip-pages/tips/make-your-own-mixtures.

University of Michigan, Medicine, http://www.med.umich.edu/yourchild/topics/tv.htm.

 

Writer: Lisa Barlage, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County.

Reviewer: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County.