Feeds:
Posts
Comments

cardinal-2524695_1920THUNK. THUNK. THUNK. THUNK. THUNK. This has been a constant sound in our house lately.  There is a poor cardinal who sees his reflection in our front window and tries to attack himself.  Upon reflection, I have realized that I am like that cardinal. I repeat the same series of actions over and over and expect a different result and am usually surprised when the results are not different.

There are many situations in life where I seem to follow the same patterns—in relationships, at work, as a caregiver, trying to get healthier, and at the grocery store where I wander endlessly trying to make sure I have everything I need in my cart.  Do you find yourself in a similar situation as me and the cardinal? THUNK. THUNK. THUNK. THUNK. THUNK.

The Stages of Change Model, developed by Prochaska and DiClemente, helps us to understand that we can make changes to our behavior patterns when we are able to recognize that it is a cyclical pattern and that there is just not a beginning and an end.  Some people are able to “stop cold turkey” when making behavior changes, but for most of us, we are like that cardinal and return again and again, hoping for different results or we take 3 steps forward and 2 steps back.

The 6 stages of change that we move through are:

  • Pre-contemplation: no desire to change behavior, we don’t see it as a problem.
  • Contemplation: aware of the problem but still is not committed or motivated to change.
  • Preparation: wants to change, but has not yet started.
  • Action: change has begun and behavior has been maintained for fewer than six months.
  • Maintenance: behavior change has gone six months and beyond, and the adopted behavior has become a habit.
  • Relapse: we returns to previous behavior(s).

Changing our outlook can be difficult, but it can also be very rewarding and beneficial to not repeating the same behaviors over and over.  As I work towards my own personal growth, I sometimes find that I have to “step outside of myself”. It is important to look at how my behavior affects others. I have also found that it is helpful to have a friend be my accountability partner and share with me where they see that I am stuck in the cycle of change.

Sometimes you will also find yourself in the role as an accountability partner for another OR you may find yourself helplessly watching as someone hits the glass over and over.  I have watched the poor cardinal for months hit the window again and again.  I tried to look up ways to stop his behavior on the internet.  Nothing worked.  I feel bad for the poor little bird, and sometimes I feel frustrated that I cannot help. If you are a caregiver, you may yourself in a similar situation. As an accountability partner, it is key to recognize the person you care for must take charge of making their own behavior change. Being able to step back and offer support without getting too emotionally involved can be hard to do.  I cannot change what another does but I can change my approach to my friend or family member as I support them as they work through the stages of change cycle.

As I write this, the cardinal is going at his reflection in the window again. Thank goodness, I do not have to be like the cardinal and can take small steps each day in  a variety of situations to change the outcome of whatever I am currently facing.  Even though there may be days where I am like the bird and hit the window, I do not have to stay stuck in the THUNK. THUNK. THUNK. THUNK. THUNK.

Written By: Jami Dellifield, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Hardin County

Reviewed By: Lorrissa Dunfee, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Belmont County

References:

Cherry, Kendra, The 6 Stages of Behavior Change: The Transtheoretical or Stages of Change Model, Very  https://www.verywellmind.com/the-stages-of-change-2794868

Behavioral Change Models, The Transtheoretical Model (Stages of Change) http://sphweb.bumc.bu.edu/otlt/MPH-Modules/SB/BehavioralChangeTheories/BehavioralChangeTheories6.html

Dellifield, J. Remley, D., Baker, S.Bates, J.S., Communication Strategies to Support a Family Member with Diabetes, 2019, https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/hyg-5322

Photo credit: https://pixabay.com/photos/cardinal-bird-teacup-trees-red-2524695/ 

 

Advertisements

It’s Fair and Festival time! My grandchildren love to go see, touch,Everyone should wash hands after touching or being around animals. Wash hands with running water and soap at least 20 seconds, rinse and dry. and feed the farm animals.  Farm animals are usually a part of the festivities with petting zoos, agricultural fairs, open farms, and shows. This activity can put your children and you at higher risk for a foodborne illness or other diseases from animals.  How do you and your family stay healthy and safe?

  • Wash your hands. It is best to use warm water and soap but if you can’t find water and soap, use some hand wipes.
    • After touching animals.
    • After touching fences, buckets, or farm equipment.
    • After leaving the animal area.
    • After removing clothes and shoes, as these can have bacteria on them.
    • Before you eat or drink beverages after leaving the animal area.
    • After going to the bathroom.
    • Before preparing foods.
  • Do not eat food or drink beverages in animal areas or where animals are.
  • Cover any open wounds or cuts when visiting or working around farm animals.
  • Avoid bites, scratches, and kicks from farm animals.
  • Be sure to supervise children when they are around animals.
  • Prevent hand-to-mouth activities, such as nail biting, finger sucking, and eating dirt.
  • Help children wash hands well with soap after interaction with any farm animal.
  • Do not let children 5 years of age or younger handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or live poultry without supervision.
  • Do not allow toys, pacifiers, spill-proof cups, baby bottles, strollers, or similar items to be in animal areas.

All animals have germs and can make you sick. Don't eat, drink or put things in your mouth when around animals. Wash hands after visiting animals.Are farm animals really dangerous to your health?  For most people they are not a problem.  However, animals carry germs or may have intestinal disease.  The animals seem healthy but can harbor pathogens.  It is difficult to know if a surface, food, or water is contaminated and many pathogens can live for long periods of time.  You don’t need to touch an animal or get manure on your hands to be exposed.  “People who eat or drink in animal areas are almost five times more likely to get ill than people who don’t eat or drink there,” according to Jeff LeJeune, a veterinary researcher with Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center  (OARCD) in Wooster.

Children under the age of five, adults over the age of 65, pregnant women, and people with chronic health conditions or weakened immune systems are most at risk.  Common harmful bacteria such as E. coli O157:H7, Cryptosporodium, and Salmonella are ones that can spread from animals to people.   Thus, washing your hands after being around, touching, or looking at animals is important. Be sure to wash using warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds and rinse thoroughly.

Enjoy the festivals and seeing animals!

Author: Pat Brinkman, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension.

References:

Center for Disease Control and Prevention.  (2015).  Farm Animals:  Prevention  Available at https://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/pets/farm-animals.html

Espinoza, M. (2005). “Disease-causing Germs at Common at Fairs.”  Ohio State University.   A printed article with quotes from Dr. Jeff LeJeune

Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Division of Health. (2014). Disease Prevention for Fairs and Festivals.  Available at http://www.nasphv.org/Documents/Public_settings_toolkit/DiseasePreventionForFairsToolkit_Kansas.pdf

With summer temperatures on the rise, it’s more important than ever to set aside the sugar filled pops and energy drinks. Americans guzzle gallons of soda every year. Let’s face it, some people just don’t love the taste of water (myself included). *Insert* fruit infused water, flavoring your water with fruits and herbs is a great way to drink more water. Not only does it help keep us hydrated. According to Dr. Dahl, infused water is a simple and healthy way to make tasteless water more appealing without adding any artificial ingredients or extra calories.

Infusing your water with fruits, herbs, or flowers not only improves the flavor, but also adds essential vitamins. Some of the best benefits of having fruit infused water include.

Glass of water infused with fruit
  • appetite control
  • hydration
  • immune defense
  • heartburn prevention
  • blood sugar regulation
  • weight management

Dehydration is known to be linked to headaches, digestive problems, obesity, and joint pain. How much water does it really take to stay hydrated? On average men need about 13 cups of water daily and women need around 9 cups.

The beauty of infused water is there is no right or wrong way to make it. You can use your preference and imagination when creating your infused waters. Below are just a couple recipes that may give you inspiration for the next time you are making a pitcher of fruit infused water.

  • Strawberry and Basil
  • Pineapple and Mint
  • Strawberry, Orange, and Mint
  • Raspberry, Cucumber, and Lime
  • Blueberry and Orange
  • Grapefruit, Cucumber, and Mint

Use these recipes or create your own – I challenge you for the next thirty days to drink at least a half gallon of infused water daily. While sitting an entire gallon of infused water in front of you may seem a little too daunting. You may find it helpful to mark a water bottle with specific times. Drink at least that amount of water by certain times in the day. You’ll be on your way to being fully hydrated in no time.

Sources:

https://www.lifehack.org/294792/15-beautiful-fruit-water-recipes-replace-soda

American Institute for Cancer Research, https://blog.aicr.org/2011/11/21/not-your-ordinary-water/ 

 

Author:  Morgan Miller, Family and Consumer Sciences Intern, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, miller.10144@osu.edu

Reviewer: Lisa Barlage, Family and Consumer Science Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Ross County, barlage.7@osu.edu

Vacations Matter…

beach

As school districts close down the 18-19 school year, I’m reminded of the joy I felt as a kid on the last day of school. The euphoria of knowing I had the whole summer to do whatever I wanted. Weeks of independence, sunshine and no schedules to follow!

It’s easy to forget those feelings as an adult with our heavy workloads, commitments, and stresses of life, but that doesn’t lessen the need for downtime. We all need to step away from our heavy schedules and hit the pause button.

According to 2018 research in the US, 51% of Americans did not take all of their vacation time and 21% “left” more than five vacation days on the table. Many stated they were worried about falling behind in their work, others indicated concerns such as losing their edge competitively in the job site, especially when it involved the potential for a promotion.

Vacations are important and provide multiple benefits:

  • Reduction of stress
  • Increase of productivity at work
  • Fostering creativity
  • Improving relationships
  • Improving focus
  • Allowing us the opportunity to digitally detox

Vacations allow us to explore new places, engage in adventures, spend time with family and friends and unplug. Imagine a calmer, energized, refocused self!  Take your vacation time this year and enjoy the freedom of summer days.  Where will you go?

Written by: Beth Stefura, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Mahoning County, stefura.2@osu.edu

Reviewed by:  Donna Green, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, green.308@osu.edu

Sources:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/reneemorad/2018/06/30/the-benefits-of-vacation-diminish-after-just-a-few-days-back-at-work-survey-says/#5df603bc3872

https://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20180828/take-a-vacation-your-heart-will-thank-you#1

teen and technology

If you have a teenager in your home, they are probably celebrating the start of their summer break.  This can mean they stay up later, sleep in longer and relax more.  Like other working parents, you may be dreading the extra-long gaming sessions and screen time that your kiddos may be planning over the summer.

Here are a few tips from media experts on how to tune down the technology and keep the peace in your house for the next 12 weeks and beyond:

  1. Dr. Jenny Radesky, the lead author of the most recent update of the Guidelines on Media and Children from the American Academy of Pediatrics, has a “no media on weekdays” rule. Dr. Radesky states “I try to help my older son be aware of the way he reacts to video games or how to interpret information we find online.” For example, she tries to explain how he is being manipulated by games that ask him to make purchases while playing.
  2. Lauren Hale, a sleep researcher at Stony Brook University in New York, suggests limiting the use of devices at least one hour before bedtime. This gives your brain time to “turn off” and relax, which will promote better sleep. According to Hale, “when kids watch or use screens at night, bedtime gets delayed.” Additionally, “when it takes longer to fall asleep, sleep quality is reduced and total sleep time is decreased.”
  3. Dr. Tom Warshawski, a pediatrician in Canada and founder of the Childhood Obesity Foundation, puts an emphasis on limiting technology by promoting the  5- 2- 1- 0 formula. That means each day includes: five servings of fruits and vegetables, no more than two hours of screen time, one hour of physical activity, and no sugary beverages.

Other screen time tips include:

  • Set firm limits on usage by making a technology schedule. Allow your teen to help with the details so everyone can agree.
  • Limit the number of devices available to your teen while you are working.
  • Limit the amount of free time that technology can eat up by signing them up for camps, volunteering, or even working.
  • Practice safe technology use by implementing rules such as remaining anonymous, using nicknames rather than your real name, reporting messaging or chats that make you feel uncomfortable to an adult, and protecting your passwords.
  • Turn off all screens during family meals
  • Turn off all screens at bedtime, keep devices with screens out of your teen’s bedroom after bedtime, and don’t allow a TV in your teen’s bedroom.
  • Research video and computer games before letting your teen get them. Check ratings from the Entertainment Software Rating Board.  Ratings can run from EC (meaning “early childhood”) to AO (meaning “adults only”). Teens probably should be limited to games rated T (for “teens”) or younger.

References

American Academy of Pediatrics (2018). Children and Media Tips. https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/Pages/Children-and-Media-Tips.aspx

Ben-Joseph, E.P. (2016). Screen Time Guidelines for Big Kids. Kids Health from Nemours. https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/screentime-bigkids.html?ref=search

Common Sense Media. Screen Time. https://www.commonsensemedia.org/screen-time

Child Obesity Foundation. What Every Family Can Do: The 5-2-1-0 Formula. https://childhoodobesityfoundation.ca/families/simple-steps-families-can-take/#tab-id-2

Kamenetz, A. (2018). What Families Need to Know About Screen Time This Summer. NPR. https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2018/07/09/625387830/what-families-need-to-know-about-screen-time-this-summer

Written by: Heather Reister, Family & Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Butler County

Reviewed by: Bridget Britton, Family & Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension Carroll County

drink colorful color tube

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

My teenage daughter lectures me from time to time about overusing plastics, especially those that can’t be recycled. We’ve bought reusable straws to use at home, and I get dirty looks if I take a straw at a restaurant. I’ve been wondering why using a plastic straw would be detrimental to my health and well-being. Turns out there is a dimension of wellness called Environmental Wellness. We may not think much about Environmental Wellness as part of an overall wellness plan that might include eating more fruits and vegetables, but our environment and how we feel about it can have a huge impact on the way we feel overall.

Environmental well-being includes trying to live in balance with the nature by understanding the impact of your interaction with nature and your personal environment, and taking action to protect the world around you. Protecting yourself from environmental hazards and minimizing the negative impact of your behavior on the environment are also central elements.

According to University California- Riverside leading a lifestyle that is respectful to our environment and minimizes any harm done to it is a critical part of environmental wellness. Environmental wellness involves a number of different aspects of personal and societal responsibilities, but generally relates to being aware of earths natural resources (soil, water, clean air) and their limits, understanding how daily habits impact natural resources, and being accountable by taking actions to minimize our impact on natural resources. Some questions to ask yourself:

  • Do I recycle?
  • If I see something damaging to the environment, do I take the steps to fix the problem?
  • Do I volunteer time to worthy causes to protect soil, water, air, or wildlife?
  • Do I take time to appreciate my environment (go hiking, fishing, meditate, swim in stream or lake)?

If you answered “No” to any of the questions, it may indicate an area where you need to improve the state of your environmental wellness.

Recycling– Recycling saves energy and natural resources. For example, recycling one ton of office paper can save the energy equivalent of consuming 322 gallons of gasoline! Some cities offer recycling programs that pick up your recycled products at your curb. In other communities, you may have to collect your recycles and drive them to a designated recycle bin. The EPA offers some good information about what can and can’t be recycled, and recycling centers are all different in terms of what they can and can’t accept. In general, glass, cardboard, paper, food and beverage cans, jugs, plastic bottles, food boxes can be recycled. Other items such as Styrofoam, and soiled products can’t. Follow the rules, otherwise recycling centers have to spend time, energy and resources to filter out products that can’t be recycled.

Hazardous materials and situations– Some materials such as oil, paint, cleaners chemicals, and other products can pollute soil and water. Oil from one oil change for example can pollute thousands of gallons of water. Many commercial garages will accept used oil, and other businesses might accept paint and other materials.

Volunteering- Consider volunteering at a national, state or local park. Maintaining trails, planting trees, cleaning up streams and rivers are all volunteer activities that might contribute to your environmental wellness. The AARP offers some ideas on volunteering to help the environment.

Appreciate the environment– Appreciating the environment and natural resources will help motivate you and your family to change habits. Set a goal to get outside and appreciate the soil, air and water. Hike, fish, hunt, camp, swim, garden and even meditate outdoors!

Getting back to straws- although straws are only a fraction of plastics waste, they have become a poster child for single use plastics that wind up consumed by wildlife and found on beaches. In fact each human on the planet consumes around 88 pounds of plastic a year! Cutting back on straws can be a gateway to making many other changes in your life to improve your environmental wellness!!

Sources:

University of California Riverside. Environmental Wellness at https://wellness.ucr.edu/environmental_wellness.html

Environmental Protection Agency. Recycling 101 at https://www.epa.gov/recycle/frequent-questions-recycling

American Association of Retired Persons. 5 ways you can help the environment. https://www.aarp.org/giving-back/info-09-2012/fun-ways-to-help-environment.html

Author: Dan Remley, Field Specialist, Associate Professor, Ohio State University Extension

Reviewer: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension

 

I remember the nurse placing a screaming dark-haired baby in my arms like it was yesterday. 18 years later, this baby is graduating from high school and telling me she wants to change her address to one different from mine.  While I appreciate her goals and ambitions, watching her go is tough.  Preparing now with a few simple things I am hoping will make this big transition smoother for both of us as she heads to college on her own.

Prepare and You Will Not Fear

I remember being taught this principle in relation to natural disasters when I was young, this same mantra is bringing me some comfort as a mother as I prepare to send a child into the world.  There is a long list of independent living skills youth and young adults need to be successful on their own; more skills than can be taught in the summer between their senior year and heading out on their own.  Starting young with developing and teaching life skills can bring peace and confidence with parents and youth as they move on.  Giving young children and teens responsibilities at home, allowing them to make mistakes and learn from them will prepare them for obstacles and responsibilities they will face when they leave home.  These needed life skills include not only skills such as cooking and laundry but budgeting, relationship skills, emotional and behavioral control, manners, self-care, time management and more.

Am I invited too?

My daughter, who is leaving, sat at the table listening one night as my sister and I discussed future Thanksgiving plans.  When we were finished she asked, “Am I invited too?”  It never occurred to me that she might be having some questions about where she would fit in when she left home.  We talked about what our communication would look like, how often, ways we would stay in contact and what family events she might want to be included in.  I let her know she would be welcome in our home anytime, without an appointment or reason. 

Plans do not always work out.  Let your young adult know that they are welcome in your home and what your requirements might be after they move away and return to visit. Help your child know that while you are excited about their new adventure you are always there if they just need to chat. Communication can be vital during this transition, for both of you.   Do not assume they know they can phone you if they feel sad or need to talk. 

Have a Plan

Have a plan for if things go wrong too.  A clear plan for contingencies can help parents make a decision when emotions are running high or a quick decision is necessary. Have you discussed what will happen if your college student makes poor grades? What if they are homesick and want to return home? What if they want or need to change schools or apartments? What if they are unable to cover expenses and call to ask for money?  Having these discussions before hand can clear up confusion for you and your child. 

Take Care of You

Feelings of loneliness, loss, and grief may all be common when a child leaves home. Have a plan to deal with those feelings.  As I have discussed this transition with friends their advice and reactions have ranged anywhere from excitement to being seriously distraught over their son or daughter moving out.  There is no right or wrong way to feel.  Try to let your feelings run their course. If you feel like crying, cry. It is important to acknowledge how you feel and not allow others to dictate your emotions.  You will not react the same way your friend did to their child moving out and that is ok. 

Every family is different and will have different plans and responses to a big change such as a child leaving home.  Try to remember what a fun new adventure this can be for your son or daughter.  Your enthusiasm can go a long way to helping them move on.  Celebrate their successes and yours, and remember just like with anything else new in life- it takes time!

Good luck! I am in this one with you. . . 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-in-between/201406/5-steps-help-your-teen-leave-the-nest https://www.healthguidance.org/entry/18004/1/how-to-cope-when-your-children-leave-home.html

Author: Alisha Barton, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Miami County, barton.345@osu.edu

Reviewer: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu