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food-waste 

How much food did you or your family throw away yesterday? Food waste is an “concern” but what type of “concern” could depend on your point of view. A colleague and I have been collaborating with philosophy professors on a food waste manuscript describing how institutions make ethical decisions on food waste and food sourcing. Philosophers look at the world much differently than most of us and consider different perspectives. Our faculty group discussed many perspectives on this topic, and thought I’d briefly share them here and discuss some applications to you and your community.

A nutritionists point of view:  The “Clean Plate Club” is a value that many of us grew up with. We were told that there are children in Africa who are starving and we should clean our plates so we don’t waste food. Many of my colleagues in public health and Extension have come to believe that this value is detrimental to our health in this age of food abundance, fast food, and buffet lines. We should eat intuitively, slowly, honoring our hunger and fullness, and leave on our plate what we don’t need.

Applying this perspective at the community level, some food pantries give people food items whether they want them or not. Much of this food is junk food- cookies, cakes , chips, candies and are donated by community members, institutions, and grocers who want to also want avoid wasting any of this food. Unfortunately, 1/3 of people of visit a food pantry are shopping for someone in their household who might have diabetes or other diet-sensitive chronic diseases. In summary, a nutritionist might say that food waste, especially if its junk food waste is not always a bad thing if it improves health.

A hunger advocate point of view: Food insecurity is a huge problem in this country. Almost 1 out of 6 Americans experience some level of food insecurity. Food insecurity is generally defined by whether or not an individual reports not having enough resources to purchase food, limiting food intake, limiting certain foods, or experiencing hunger. As many experts point out, there should not be food insecurity in developed countries given our abundant food supply. This is certainly a complex problem, but food waste is a major culprit. Every year in the US, 133 billion pounds of food is wasted by retailers, farmers, restaurants, and consumers. Many communities are responding by developing food councils, partnerships, and hunger coalitions and initiate gleaning and food recovery programs.

An ecologists point of view: This perspective was an interesting one that I had not thought much about. An ecologist might argue that really when it comes down to it, there isn’t any such thing as food waste since some organism will benefit, whether it be a bacteria, a raccoon, or grizzly bear (in Alaska, bikers are referred to as meals on wheels). We are all part of the web of life and according to laws of thermodynamics: energy is neither created or destroyed! We all benefit from biodiversity, and the food chain. This is a really complex point of view however. When it comes down to it, some life forms are more beneficial to us than others at least immediately and others in ways we don’t understand. Raccoons eat our garbage, a grizzly (or mountain lion) might eat the raccoon, and being an apex predator might keep down deer or other animal populations that damage crops.

A food safety advocate point of food: Foodborne illness is a huge problem in this country. Every year 48 million Americans experience some form of food borne illness. Most foodborne illnesses usually occur because of time-temperature abuses; when meats or poultry are not cooked properly, or left out too long at room temperatures. In other cases, ready to eat foods are contaminated with raw meat juices, or by bacteria, viruses transferred to food through improperly washed hands. People at risk for foodborne illness are the elderly, young children, or people with compromised immune systems. A food safety advocate would argue that food waste is necessary if there might be a concern regarding food safety. Many food pantries and food banks have polices about accepting dented cans, home-canned foods, custom processed game meat, etc. In many cases, the risk for foodborne illness is minimal, but food safety advocates would argue that any amount of risk is too great to bear, even if it means a food pantry has less food to distribute.

Have I confused you? What does this all mean for you, or your community? Which perspective do you agree with? Can you see how different perspectives sometimes conflict with one another? For example, a food pantry volunteer who is a hunger advocate might get irritated with food safety policies, suggesting that dented canned food should be wasted. From our Extension point of view, how can this knowledge, and understanding be applied to the issue of food waste? Consider your own values- is health and wellness most important, is it helping people be food secure, is it helping the environment? Consider overlaps in the different points of view in your understanding and actions. For example…

  • You can start a compost pile to discard spoiled produce and other non-fatty foods in your household or if you volunteer at a food pantry. Compost is great for vegetable gardens, flowers, and trees. This takes into consideration the points of view of the ecologist and a food safety advocate.
  • Encourage food pantries in your community to transition to a MyPlate Guided Rainbow of Choice model where people choose food that they want or need. Nutrition education can also be helpful to demonstrate how to use various foods and so healthy food doesn’t go to waste.
  • Donate healthy desirable food to a food pantry and not foods that have been sitting in your cupboard for a year, like the canned cranberry jelly from thanksgiving or shrimp cocktail sauce from the Superbowl party.
  • Don’t order from the buffet. Period. Most buffets probably waste food. What’s more, when you eat from the buffet you’ll probably waste food and/or overeat, and as certified food safety instructor, I can attest that there are LOTS of food safety challenges with buffets.
  • What are some ideas that you might have?

Author: Dan Remley, Assistant Professor, Field Specialist, Food, Nutrition, and Wellness, OSU Extension

Reviewer: Shannon Carter, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, OSU Extension, Fairfield County

 

Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Burden of Foodborne Illness: Findings. Accessed at http://www.endhunger.org/PDFs/2014/USDA-FoodLoss-2014.pdf

Feeding America. Hunger in America 2014. Accessed at http://www.endhunger.org/PDFs/2014/USDA-FoodLoss-2014.pdf

Ohio State University Extension Factsheet. MyPlate Guided Rainbow of Colors Choice System for Food Pantry Staff and Volunteers. Accessed at http://www.endhunger.org/PDFs/2014/USDA-FoodLoss-2014.pdf

United States Department of Agriculture. The Estimated Amount, Value, and Calories Postharvest Food Losses at the Retail and Consumer Levels in the United States. Accessed at http://www.endhunger.org/PDFs/2014/USDA-FoodLoss-2014.pdf

 

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nationalredday

February is American Heart Month sponsored by The American Heart Association. It is no surprise that heart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women. What may surprise a few, is that it’s the number one killer in women, claiming nearly 500,000 lives. Most people believed that it affects more men so many women did not pay much attention to the disease. National Wear Red Day was started to raise awareness about heart disease being the number one killer of women. Tomorrow will mark 15 years since the 1st National Wear Red Day was observed. National Wear Red Day is held on the first Friday in February.

Since raising awareness many women have been making changes in their lives to be more heart conscience. Some of the strides they’ve made have included losing weight, increasing their exercise, making a healthy behavior change and checking cholesterol levels. Today, nearly 300 fewer women die from heart disease and stroke each day, and deaths in women have decreased by more than 30 percent over the past 10 years! Even though all of this progress has been made, 1 in 3 women still die of heart disease and stroke each year.

 

So what can you do besides wear RED tomorrow? Know your heart healthy numbers.

  1. Risk factors you can* and cannot control
    1. High blood pressure*
    2. Diabetes*
    3. Lack of regular activity*
    4. Age
    5. Gender
    6. Heredity
  2. Know your numbers
    1. Total cholesterol
    2. HDL cholesterol
    3. Blood Pressure
    4. Blood Sugar
    5. Body Mass Index
  3. Take Action
    1. Manage blood pressure
    2. Control cholesterol
    3. Reduce blood sugar
    4. Get active
    5. Eat better
    6. Lose weight
    7. Stop smoking

If you would like to find out more information on each of the areas above, you can visit GoRedforWomen.org  On their site you can take a risk factors quiz and learn more about the warning signs of a heart attack and stroke.

I hope to see lots of RED tomorrow.

 

Sources:

https://www.goredforwomen.org/get-involved/national-wear-red-day/national-wear-red-day/

https://www.goredforwomen.org/fight-heart-disease-women-go-red-women-official-site/know-your-risk/

https://healthfinder.gov/NHO/FebruaryToolkit.aspx

 

Author: Amanda Bohlen, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Washington County, bohlen.19@osu.edu

Reviewer: Misty Harmon, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Perry County, harmon.416@osu.edu

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Stethoscope on cashIf you are lucky enough to have elderly parents, you know what a precious gift it is to have them. However, with this precious gift of time, there are some challenges that occur as they age and need your help. It is difficult when the roles of parent and child begin to shift and the children become the caregivers. One of the most complicated issues is when there is a need to take over your parents’ finances. Taking control can be awkward and complicated, but putting it off too long can make it very difficult to sort out all of their accounts and make the necessary legal steps to ensure your ability to successfully manage your parent’s money.

How do you know when it is time to step in? Watch for early signs that your parent’s cognitive ability is declining, and there is a need to step in and take control. If you wait too long, there’s a good chance that significant financial losses have occurred. Some of the signs to look for are:

  • They become forgetful about cash
  • They start getting calls from creditors
  • Their house is filled with expensive new purchases
  • They have difficulty with simple tasks like balancing their checkbook
  • Bills have been paid repeatedly or not paid at all
  • Bills that seem much higher than they should be and cannot be explained
  • Donations to charity that do not match your parents priorities

 

Raising the topic might be difficult. Older adults may be resistant to relinquishing control of their finances. They may see this as the first step of losing their independence, which is one of the top two concerns for older adults. Prepare to Care: A Planning Guide for Families from AARP gives helpful insight on how to start the conversation. They suggest:

  1. Look for an opening: You might use an article you read about or something you saw in the news to raise the topic.
  2. Respect your loved one’s wishes: Your plan must be centered on the person receiving care.
  3. Size up the situation: Figuring out your loved one’s priorities help determine your next steps
  4. Counter resistance: Your loved one might say, “I just don’t want to talk about it.” Some people are private by nature. If your first conversation does not go well, try again.

Managing your own finances can be challenging enough, and you aren’t excited about taking on the task of managing your parents finances as well. Addressing the topic can be awkward, but if no one steps in to help, the assets that your parents spent a lifetime accumulating could be lost.

 

Written by: Kathy Green, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Clark County

Reviewed by: Michelle Treber, Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Pickaway County

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post-95090_1920

For many people, the cold winter months bring an onset of what is described as the winter blues.  The colder, darker winter months can cause a change in our moods and our behaviors.  Some examples are sleeping more, becoming more irritable, eating more, and avoiding friends or social situations.

Dr. Emma Seppala, Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University and Co-Director of the Yale College Emotional Intelligence Project at Yale University, offers these tips for beating the winter blues:

  • CONNECT
    • One great way to connect to others in the winter months is to volunteer, at a shelter, a food bank, a nursing home, or at an after school program.
    • Another way is to stay active.  Join a fitness class.  Invite some friends to go on a walk or meet at a gym to shoot some hoops.
  • BREATHE
    • Practice mindfulness activities, like yoga or meditation, to help center your thoughts and help you to relax.
  • SAVOR
    • Be present in whatever activity you are engaged in. Turn off the cell phones and focus on where you are and who are you are with.
    • Curl up with your loved ones (spouse, childen, grandchildren) under a warm and cozy, blanket and read a book or watch a funny movie.
    • Eat healthier meals and take time to eat at a leisurely pace.

If you find that the winter blues are interfering with your daily activities for a period longer than two weeks, please consult your family physician or a mental health professional.  Seasonal Affective Disorder is a mood disorder that is categorized as a type of depression and occurs during months where individuals have less exposure to natural sunlight that can be treated with appropriate medical help.

Written By: Jami Dellifield, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Hardin County, Ohio State Extension, dellifield.2@osu.edu

Reviewed By:  Pat Brinkman, Family and Consumer Sciences Educator, Fayette County, Ohio State University Extension, brinkman.93@osu.edu

SOURCES:

Sepalla, Emma M. PhD, “3 Definitive Ways to Beat The Winter Blues”, Psychology Today. Web January 20, 2016 https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/feeling-it/201601/3-definitive-ways-beat-winter-blues

https://www.mentalhealth.gov/what-to-look-for/mood-disorders/seasonal-affective-disorder/index.html

REFERENCES:

Roecklein, Kathryn A., Rohan, Kelly J., PhD, “Seasonal Affective Disorder: An Overview and Update”, Psychiatry (Edgmont). 2005 Jan; 2(1): 20–26. Published online 2005 Jan. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3004726/

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/Pages/dealing-with-winter-blues-sad.aspx

“Information from Your Doctor: Seasonal Affective Disorder”, American Family Physician. 2000 Mar 1;61(5):1531-1532. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0301/p1531.html

PHOTO CREDIT:

https://pixabay.com/en/post-light-lamp-outside-95090/

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raspberry-995344_640

Did you know that today is National Raspberry Cream Pie Day?  Raspberries are abundant at this time of year.  Raspberries- like many other fruits- are an excellent source of Vitamin C, manganese and fiber. They also contain the phytonutrient ellagic acid, a potential anti-cancer agent.   They are an excellent source of soluble fiber and may help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Raspberries also provide a slow release of carbohydrates into the blood stream.  This fruit is very low in calories, providing just 64 calories per cup serving. Raspberries also provide 8 grams of fiber and 54% of the daily need for Vitamin C.

If you are looking for raspberries on this eventful day you may be surprised to find that a variety of colors from red to black to purple to yellow are all available. Raspberries should be bright, shiny, and uniform in color. Avoid ones that are dull and appear to have surface moisture, as moisture promotes decay.  Handle this produce very gently to avoid bruising. Bruising shortens the life of the fruit and contributes to low quality. Berries are highly perishable; therefore, store fresh raspberries uncovered in the refrigerator as soon as possible. Gently rinse berries in cold water prior to use.  Never soak berries in water.  Be aware that raspberry shelf life is short so only buy what you can use. Plan to eat your berries within one to two days after purchase.

Try this quick and easy Raspberry Cream Pie Recipe:raspberry-925190_640

Ingredients

  • 1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 5 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 pints fresh raspberries
  • 1 (9 inch) prepared reduced fat graham cracker pie crust

Directions

  1. Whisk sweetened condensed milk and lemon juice together in a bowl; gently fold 1 pint of raspberries.
  2. Spread filling evenly within the crust.
  3. Refrigerate until set, at least 3 hours.
  4. Top pie with remaining fresh raspberries when ready to serve and enjoy!

Recipe adapted from allrecipes http://allrecipes.com/recipe/229009/fresh-red-raspberry-cream-pie/print/?recipeType=Recipe&servings=16

 

Not enough time to make a pie today? Try these quick and easy ways to add raspberries to your National Raspberry Cream Pie Day:

  • Add fresh raspberries to hot and cold cereals
  • Top nonfat yogurt with fresh raspberries and some granola for a great breakfast, snack or dessert.
  • Combine raspberries into a fresh lettuce salad and top with a low fat vinaigrette dressing
  • Lastly, just enjoy fresh berries as a snack. They are delicious, sweet and juicy!

WRITTEN BY: Susan Zies, Extension Educator, Family & Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Wood County and Marcia Jess, Program Coordinator, Wood County.

REVIEWED BY: Shawna Hite, Healthy People Program Specialist, Ohio State University Extension, Family & Consumer Sciences

Sources:

http://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/HYG-5511

http://extension.illinois.edu/raspberries/

http://www.msuextension.org/nutrition/documents/RaspberryFFS.pdf

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This time of year is always magical from a gardening perspective. Perennials and bulbs are blooming, greenhouses are open and neighbors are planting their annuals. Nothing brings us out of our winter blahs faster than the scent of hyacinths and lilacs or the beauty of daffodils and tulips. Did you know that flowers serve more than just an aesthetic purpose? They also can improve our overall well-being.

Lilacs

Planting or keeping flowers around the home and in the workplace greatly reduces a person’s stress levels. Natural aesthetic beauty is soothing to people, and planting ornamental flowers around the home environment is an excellent way to lower levels of stress and anxiety. People who keep flowers in and around their home feel happier, less stressed, and more relaxed. As a result of the positive energy they derive from the environment, the chances of suffering from stress-related depression are decreased as well. Overall, adding flowers to your home or work environment reduces your perceived stress levels and makes you feel more relaxed, secure, and happy. Flowers can help you achieve a more optimistic outlook on your life; bringing you both pleasing visual stimulation and an increase in your perceived happiness.

Having plants, going for a walk in the park, or even looking at a landscape poster can produce psychological benefits, reduce stress, and improve concentration. Flowers cut from the garden add a pop of color to the living areas in the home. Bringing potted plants into your work space helps improve productivity, as well as an increase in creativity and job satisfaction.

Flowers

Don’t have a green thumb, struggling with some plants, or just beginning to plant?  Want some creative tips for new projects? The National Gardening Association has tons of information to help you out.  Allow the outdoors to bring out your natural beauty. Behold the powers of flowers!

Sources:

http://ellisonchair.tamu.edu/health-and-well-being-benefits-of-plants/#.VzyCdrgrK70

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/urban-mindfulness/200903/plants-make-you-feel-better

www.garden.org

www.onegreenplanet.org

Written by:  Melissa Welker M.Ed., B.S., Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Fulton County, Maumee Valley EERA, welker.87@osu.edu

Reviewed by: Donna Green, Family & Consumer Sciences Educator, Ohio State University Extension, Erie County, Erie Basin EERA, green.308@osu.edu

 

 

 

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nutsThere are many people who will tell you that they have a food allergy when they might really have food sensitivity.

What is the difference?  While food allergies and food sensitivities can both leave you feeling terrible, a true food allergy can be fatal.

They may have similar symptoms – nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea and vomiting, but there are differences. Food allergies affect our immune system and affect the whole body, not just your stomach. Food sensitivity occurs when your body cannot properly digest a particular food. Food allergy symptoms usually come on suddenly, a small amount of the food can trigger the reaction, it happens every time you eat the food, and it can be life threatening. On the other hand, food sensitivities usually come on gradually, it may only cause symptoms when you eat a large amount of the food and is not life threatening.

There are some general differences between allergy and sensitivity.

Food Allergy symptoms:

  • Rash, hives or itchy skin
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Sudden drop in blood pressure, trouble swallowing or breathing – this is life-threatening and you should call 911.

Food Sensitivity symptoms:

  • Gas, cramps, or bloating
  • Heartburn
  • Headaches
  • Irritability or nervousness

There are eight common foods that cause 90% of food allergy reactions:  peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, milk, eggs, soy, and wheat. The two most common foods that cause sensitivity are lactose in milk and gluten although we can be sensitive to a wide variety of foods including some of the ones that cause allergies!seafood

 

How can you prevent or treat food allergies or sensitivities?  It is best to visit your doctor or health practitioner if you have experienced any of the above symptoms after eating.  Your doctor can do testing but may also recommend that you keep a food diary or stop eating some foods that you suspect may be causing the problems.

If you have a true food allergy, you will have to totally avoid the food. If it is food sensitivity, you may be able to eat small amounts of the food without causing a problem.

References:

Food Allergies. Clemson Cooperative Extension. http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/nutrition/nutrition/special_needs/hgic4158.html

Food Allergies and Sensitivities. http://food.unl.edu/allergy/allergy-sensitivity

Food Allergy, or Something Else? http://www.webmd.com/allergies/foods-allergy-intolerance?

Written by:  Marilyn Rabe, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Franklin County.

Reviewed by:  Tammy Jones, Extension Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences, Ohio State University Extension, Pike County.

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